Worksite Wellness Programs Not Just A Fad, Survey Shows

August 20th, 2015 by

The post below is a guest blog from Meaghan Roach who serves as Health Management Advisor for CAI’s employee benefits partner Hill, Chesson & Woody.

BalanceA few weeks ago, the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) unveiled the results of their 2015 employee benefits survey at their national conference. The results? Of no surprise to many in the industry, health and worksite wellness programs continue to grow in prevalence and popularity. SHRM attributes much of this to employers’ desires to combat rising health care costs. In addition to slowing the cost trend, health management programs may also increase productivity, decrease absenteeism, and improve a company’s ability to recruit and retain top talent.

Based on the survey, popular health management programs included biometric screenings and health assessments, tobacco cessation programs, lifestyle coaching, and preventive programs targeted at employees with chronic conditions. New to the scene this year are company-provided fitness/activity trackers and fitness competitions, which are offered by 13 percent and 34 percent of the respondents, respectively. New offerings in the past few years seem to have a common theme of physical activity, with standing desks (25 percent of respondents offered in 2015), on-site fitness classes (17 percent), and off-site fitness class subsidies (16 percent) all being added to the survey’s options in the past three years.

Health and wellness benefits that saw the largest increase in prevalence over the past five years involved premium differentials for participation in a variety of activities, including preventive care, completion of an annual health risk assessment, and not using tobacco products.

BenefitsPro summarized several other areas of the survey – including telecommuting, health savings accounts and family friendly benefits – but noted that wellness programs are certainly a key takeaway from this year’s results. In fact, as more millennials enter the workforce and demand a strong company culture, worksite wellness programs are becoming almost expected in the minds of potential employees. Eighty percent of survey respondents provide employees with wellness resources and educational information, and seventy percent indicated that they offer wellness programs, suggesting an attempt to integrate health initiatives into company culture across the majority of organizations in the United States.

Interested in how your company can offer initiatives like the above that can have a positive effect on employee morale and productivity, and ultimately your bottom line? Contact our Health Management team and allow us to help guide you through development of a wellness program to complement your employee benefits package.

 

 

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