Posts Tagged ‘workforce engagement’

No Cost / High Impact Summer Benefits to Keep Employees Engaged

Thursday, June 2nd, 2016

During the winter months, when the weather outside is cold, gray and gloomy, employees typically welcome the warm glow of a well-lit and heated Summer_benefits_for_employeesoffice environment.  Your workforce is anxious to get into the office, grab some warm coffee and get to work. They are less likely to leave the warmth of the building for lunch or to take time off from work in order to enjoy outside activities.

As the seasons begin to change and the weather warms, focus begins to shift a little more toward the “life” side of the work-life balance equation.  Employees will tend to arrive at work a little later on a beautiful morning, take longer lunch hours and may leave earlier than usual to get home and get a few things done before the daylight ends.

As an employer, should you do anything about this phenomenon?  Is there anything you can do?  Absolutely.  You can acknowledge this important balance for employees and demonstrate your awareness of the seasonal focus shift by offering some additional benefits for the summer season.  Such benefits will cost you nothing at all.

Start by making a list of possible benefits you could offer during the summer months, making sure you take into account any negative impact to productivity. Every business is different. There will always be things you would like to offer, but simply cannot due to the needs of the business.  Share your list of potential benefits with your workforce to see what your employees are most interested in before making your decision.  Here are a few to start thinking about:

Summer / Flexible Work Hours –

Many organizations are shifting their measurement of productivity away from counting the number of hours an employee works, and looking instead to answer the question “Is the work getting done?” Companies that have adopted this mentality with regards to employee work ethic find it easier to implement a more flexible work schedule.  Such schedules allow employees to stray from the normal 9-5, and work instead an 8-4 or 10-6 schedule.  Some organizations will shift to a 35-hour workweek during the summer months, allowing employees to pick a day of the week to leave at lunch. Some offer 4, 10-hour days allowing some employees to be off on Friday and some on Monday for a longer weekend.

Casual Dress –

In many of the high-end tech companies, casual dress every day is the norm.  However, the majority of large corporations still adhere to a specific, non-casual dress code during normal business hours.  During the summer months, some organizations will implement “casual Friday”, allowing employees to arrive at work in jeans or even shorts, so long as their attire is in good taste and appropriate.

Team Building –

Providing a planned activity for an entire team or department is one way to get everyone outside and still benefit the group as a whole. Morale before the event is high in anticipation.  Morale after the event is high having participated.  Going to a “fun park”, bowling, or even a catered BBQ picnic on the grounds can be used to show employees that you are aware of how difficult it is to stay focused when it is nicer outside than inside while demonstrating appreciation for their work and contribution to the organization.

Employee Garden –

If you have the space for it at your facility, you would be surprised at how many employees enjoy working in an actual garden.  There are many fruits, vegetables and herbs that can be grown during the summer months.  The opportunity for some of your employees to take a few minutes out of their day and tend to a garden can be a huge benefit.  Start small and it will grow to be larger each year as more employees get involved.

Employees desire separating their personal and professional life.  When the employer demonstrates their appreciation for the same, employees feel more appreciated. They are happier, more engaged, more productive and typically more committed to staying with their employer for a longer period of time.

renee

 

CAI Advice & Resolution team member Renee Watkins is a seasoned HR professional with a diverse background in Human Resource. Renee provides CAI members with practical advice in a wide-range of human resource functions including conflict resolution, compliance and regulatory issues, and employee relations.

Use Effective Measures to Engage Your Workforce and Reduce Turnover

Tuesday, July 19th, 2011

A key factor in reducing employee turnover and retaining top talent is ensuring that your staff members are engaged in their work and the company. Employees who are engaged are not only satisfied in their positions, but they often go above and beyond to help themselves and their organizations succeed. However, recent statistics show that the majority of American workers are currently disengaged with their jobs.

There are many factors that turn employees who were once top achievers into those who only complete their work to get it done. Some engagement drainers include lack of individual recognition, inadequate feedback or poor managerial practices. Organizations that do not take the necessary steps to connect their workforce with the company’s overall mission will have a hard time keeping their staff around. Companies that have a high level of employee engagement achieve better business results.

The following are measures your company can take to increase employee engagement and reduce workforce turnover:

  1. Why are People Leaving? Before rolling out an employee engagement plan, company leaders should actively research why people leave their organization. Knowing your turnover rate and the areas in which people leave the most will help you uncover issues that are affecting employee engagement.
  2. Find the Culprit Before the Exit Interview. Exit Interviews are beneficial because they reveal a number of reasons for why employees choose to resign. Unfortunately, supervisors and managers only get this information when the employee has put in his or her last-day notice. To keep staff members satisfied before they decide to depart, implement Stay Interviews at least once per year. This meeting allows employees to discuss with their supervisor the factors that could potentially cause them to search for a new job.
  3. Communicate! Communicate! Communicate! A lack of communication is often cited as a reason for why employees quit. Provide multiple communication channels for workers at all levels to utilize. Managers and supervisors should meet with their employees multiple times per year to provide and receive feedback. These meetings should encourage staff members to speak freely about their goals and concerns.
  4. Manage Job Expectations. Losing employees within the first year of their hire date is an incredible loss in time and money for an organization. Many times the reasons for a worker’s short tenure are inaccurate job descriptions and unrealistic expectations and goals. Clearly define positions and their accompanying responsibilities when soliciting new hires. Additionally, when interviewing candidates, make them well aware of the position’s potential unfavorable aspects. Do not sugar coat.

CAI’s 2011 Compensation and Benefits Conference will provide additional tips and information for retaining top employees and creating a more engaged work environment through a well-thought-out, total rewards strategy.  Register today at www.capital.org/compconf.

Photo source: Woodley wonderworks