Posts Tagged ‘Termination’

Top Reasons Why Employees Voluntarily Leave Your Company

Thursday, March 13th, 2014

FiringThere are several reasons employees decide to leave their jobs. Every employee has specific criteria that makes a job enjoyable or worth making a commitment to. Below are some of the top reasons employees quit their employers to start new positions at different companies.

Some employees do not want to tolerate the demands of their job position or suffer while their company is going through a hard time. Employees in this position may not want to put up with the following:

  • Weekend work, long hours or frequent travel
  • Additional administrative duties added to current job responsibilities, such as copying or filing
  • Raises and promotions currently unavailable
  • Corporate relocation of offices or manufacturing plant

 

Other employees are looking to work on their professional development and won’t stick around long at a place that doesn’t value employee training. To avoid this scenario at your company, consider providing your staff members with the following opportunities:

  • Training programs to develop and gain skills
  • Access to conferences related to their field or industry
  • Subscription to an industry or trade magazine

 

Many employees want to know if they can have a career at their current company. If there’s not a future in it for them, they may look for another company that will need them. Here are some ways to make sure you’re considering your employees’ long-term goals:

  • Ask your employees what they would like to gain from working with your company
  • Implement a program that identifies and trains high performers for leadership positions in the future
  • During your regular employee feedback meetings, get their input on the types of projects they enjoy working on and what they’d like to work on next and in the future

 

A poor company culture is a big reason why employees quit their jobs. Some of the specific reasons related to poor company culture that drive employees to leave include:

  • Constant reorganization of management structure and company direction
  • Rejection of ideas or suggestions to improve the environment
  • Favoritism of some workers over others by team leaders
  • Competition among departments or teams, creating an environment that is more about competing than cooperating.
  • Promoting employees with less training or experience over  more deserving and/or skilled employees

 

If you have questions regarding your organization’s retention strategy, please contact a member of CAI’s Advice and Resolution Team at 919‑878‑9222 or 336‑668‑7746.

Four Tips to Remember When Documenting

Tuesday, November 6th, 2012

Whether you’re about to give an employee performance review or investigate a harassment claim, how you document is important. Documenting employee actions provides necessary support for a number of workplace decisions: pay increase, termination, suspension, promotion, etc. Proper documentation helps you make better decisions for your company and your workforce. A good written account may also reduce your risk of legal liability.

Here are four things to not forget when putting things down on paper:

Use Specifics

All employer documents have the potential to be at the center of an employee complaint or lawsuit. Knowing this, it’s best to use as many specifics as possible—so that if a third-party reads the document, they know exactly what has happened. Include all parties involved, exactly when and where the event happened and how you intervened.

Be Immediate

Once you’ve given a performance review or dealt with a complaint, you should document the details while they’re still fresh in your head. You could lose crucial details even waiting just a few days after the incident occurred. Make the document work for you instead of against you.

Be Clear

Because your documents have the possibility of reaching a courtroom, being as clear as you can be will work in your favor. For example, if you have poor handwriting, type up your document. If you are unsure about an incident, don’t lie or embellish—say that you are unsure. Honesty and a good effort will help you.

Be Consistent

Treat all employees equally. If you are going to write someone up for blatantly disobeying a policy, you have to write up everyone who breaks that same rule. Same goes for a positive example—praise employees when they deserve it and mark it on their performance reviews. If you don’t follow this rule, you could get slapped with a discrimination suit, especially if your documents can’t clear your name.

For guidance on documenting specific circumstances, please call a member of CAI’s Advice and Counsel Team at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746.

Photo Source: Victor1558

Why Your Company Needs an Up-To-Date Employee Handbook

Tuesday, June 5th, 2012

Although there is no federal law that requires organizations to produce employee handbooks, providing them for your staff helps create positive employer-employee relationships and protects your organization from potential wrongful harassment, termination or discrimination lawsuits.

Here are two reasons why handbooks benefit employers and employees:

Promotes a Positive Workplace Atmosphere

Company handbooks provide employees with a set of clearly defined policies, rules and guidelines. Well-written handbooks also outline consequences for not following company policies, as well as where employees should turn to if they have a problem. Having this information on hand helps workers understand their employer’s expectations and what they should expect from their employer.

Because each employee receives the same handbook, they all review the same information. These documents set the precedent for fair and consistent employee treatment. To ensure effectiveness and understanding and to avoid low employee morale and job dissatisfaction, keep your handbook clear, concise, easy to follow, and up to date.

Is a Legal Document

Although you don’t want to fill your employee handbook with confusing legalese, it can serve as your biggest protection for or evidence against your company in a lawsuit. Many courts see employee handbooks as contracts between an employer and its employees. For this reason, avoid using promises, guarantees and entitlements in your handbook because if left unfulfilled, those promises could be used against you in a lawsuit.

Making sure you follow the policies and procedures outlined in your employee handbook is critical.  Routinely adhering to your handbook will be one of your best defenses. However, the opposite is also true. If you have several rules that you don’t follow, your current or former employees can use them against you. Regulations that you seldom enforce or frequently change should be omitted from your handbook to safeguard your organization.

It’s impossible to cover every workplace situation in your handbook because additional issues will always occur after you finalize it, so keep your policies appropriately flexible. Additionally, putting a statement in your handbook explaining that the document is not a complete collection of company policies and that your company reserves the right to change any policy is suggested.

If you have questions or would like your company handbook reviewed, please call a member of CAI’s Advice and Counsel Team at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746.

Photo Source: West Point Public Affairs

Stop Poor Employee Behavior from Damaging Your Workplace

Tuesday, January 24th, 2012

“No one has ever been fired for a bad attitude. Sure, attitude may be the reason given, but the real reason was poor behavior. We cannot know another person’s attitude (whatever that is) but you can observe and act on behaviors,” Bruce Clarke, CAI’s president and CEO, says in the latest edition of his News & Observer column, “The View from HR.”

Some managers are quick to say that their poor performing employees have bad attitudes. However, if they observe the actions of their poor performers and offer suggestions for improvement, managers can turn employees with perceived bad attitudes into productive workers who positively affect the company’s bottom line.

Knowing how to correctly handle an employee with a behavior problem is invaluable for employers.  Threatening to fire or demote an employee the next time she displays poor behavior will do little to help improve her work performance. Use the information below to help resolve behavioral issues at your company:

Explain

Use specific examples of poor performance that you have witnessed when addressing these employees. Exaggeration and hearsay from others is not helpful and may cause employees to hold resentment or perform even worse. Communicate effectively by telling your poor performer what you expect from him and what the consequences are for not meeting expectations. Doing this gives him an opportunity to improve and also allows you to check his progress to see if further action is needed.

Retrain

Inadequate training can be the culprit of problem performance at your organization. Talk with your employees to make sure they are informed about the skills and experience needed for their positions. If poor training is the reason, retrain them correctly and give them time to adjust to their updated roles. Sometimes analyzing training reveals that an employee is actually not the best fit for her job. If this occurs, see if she has tasks that you can give to another employee or if you can reassign her to a new position.

Monitor

Employees with unsuitable workplace behavior should have increased supervision. Micromanaging is not necessary, but checking in with them frequently will help you determine if they can improve or if you need to let them go. Once you and your poor performer agree on an improvement plan, set up a weekly meeting to assess his progress and uncover any obstacles that he may be facing. Reward employees or take further disciplinary action based on the information you learn from these meetings. Keep these meetings documented so you and the employee have a record of his workplace behavior. Documenting these meetings also will be legally helpful if terminating an employee becomes an option.

Be swift when dealing with employees who display poor workplace behavior. Addressing the issue quickly will show your intolerance for unsatisfactory performance. Failing to do so will lower your team’s morale because productive staff members will be responsible for carrying the weight of their less productive colleagues. You are also in danger of wasting time, energy, resources and money when you accept poor employee performance. Call CAI’s Advice and Counsel Team at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746 for additional guidance on performance management issues.

Photo Source: National Assembly For Wales / Cynulliad Cymru’s photostream

Addressing Poor Performance in the Workplace

Thursday, September 29th, 2011

sleep at jobEmployees can exhibit poor workplace performance in more than a few ways. Some consistently arrive late and leave early, others are busy updating their social media accounts, and a few frequently struggle with closing their sales. No matter the types of problem performers your business has, continuing to let them under produce will harm your organization’s success.

Acknowledging and confronting poor performers are often challenging tasks for managers to execute. Weak sales, unsatisfactory customer service and decreased employee morale are a few of the consequences of ignoring low achievers.  To strengthen your business’ credibility in hiring top talent, address a poor performance issue immediately.

First identify the underlying cause that is making an employee perform inadequately. Many managers automatically assume that employees are solely responsible for their less than stellar work ethics. When investigating the situation, you might conclude that the employee is overly stressed from his to-do list, one of his immediate family members is seriously ill or he received incorrect information when he was trained. Once you narrow down the reason, you can proceed with a tailored improvement plan.

Incorporate the following actions into your improvement plans to accelerate productivity in low-achieving employees:

  1. Use specific examples when discussing occurrences of poor performance. Do not exaggerate or use the opinions of others when confronting the employee.  Ex:  “Joe, I’d like to address your tardiness. I have witnessed you being late more than five times during the past two weeks.”
  2. Take care to ensure that you know the best communication method for approaching your problem performer. No one handles feedback in the same manner, especially negative feedback. Proper communication can alleviate emotional outbursts or feelings of resentment.
  3. Create an environment of constant feedback and clearly communicated expectations. Waiting around to give feedback can lessen an employee’s sense of urgency to correct a mistake. Feel free to ask employees to repeat their understanding of your feedback, as well as the goals you want them to attain.
  4. Document each conversation and review session that you have with problem personnel. Be exact with dates, goals, deadlines, expectations and feedback. Capture both positive and negative results from the improvement process. This will help you evaluate whether the employee can turn his work efforts around.

If you do not see favorable results after maintaining an employee improvement plan for several weeks, your organization could consider moving the employee to another position that suits his abilities better. If this is not an option and all other efforts to improve productivity have failed, termination could be an effective solution.

To explore additional methods for handling poor performers, please contact an account manager at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746 and inquire about CAI’s class called Managing Problem Performance.

Photo Source: hawken king

Reasons to Say Goodbye to an Employee

Tuesday, September 6th, 2011

Firing

CAI’s President and CEO, Bruce Clarke, recently shared a few surefire reasons to terminate an employee to Fox Business News. As the economy slowly recovers, it is important to maintain a great employee culture through increased morale and engagement. Ensuring your company has team players dedicated to their work is also important when trying to maintain success in tough economic times. If any of your employees do the following, it might be wise to consider letting them go:

  1. Excessive Tardiness: There are times when tardiness is unavoidable, but if an employee constantly arrives to work more than a few minutes late or takes a longer than average lunch break, he is doing a disservice to your organization. Issuing a warning to employees who have an unreasonable amount of tardies may work to alleviate the problem. However, if warnings do not work, firing is an option.
  2. Being a Debbie Downer: Employers and employees are already trying to survive the recession, so a staff member with a bad attitude can create chaos for everyone. Leaner staff and fewer resources mean that people have more to do, and an employee who is a not a team player will not last long. Gossip, inappropriate comments and vulgar language are among several items that senior management should not tolerate.
  3. A Social Media Dependency: The internet has made connecting with people a simple process. Socializing through any of the network-based websites, such as Facebook and Twitter maybe fine in moderation. However, if you have employees that do more tweeting and connecting than completing their actual assignments, it is time to bolster your company’s social media policy. Watch out for employees who post unfavorable information about their colleagues or place of work. This type of communication is grounds for firing.

For more information and tips related to employee termination, please contact a member of CAI’s Advice and Counsel Team at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746.

Photo Source: Paul Stevenson