Posts Tagged ‘retirement’

Retirement Planning for the Multi-Generational Workforce

Tuesday, October 16th, 2012

The following is a guest post from John McPhail. John serves Bank of Oak Ridge as a Business Relationship Specialist. He has more than 15 years of experience in the financial industry, including direct sales, marketing, and banking. “I guess I kind of learned HR the hard way when I ran my own business, but the experiences were invaluable. If it weren’t for a good HR mentor, I would have ended up a D.O.L. statistic”, said John.

As I sit here reflecting on the 2012 CAI Compensation and Benefit Conference, I can’t help but smile a knowing smile. This smile actually brings to mind a story.

One day Alice came to a fork in the road and saw a Cheshire cat in a tree.

“Which road do I take?” she asked.

“Where do you want to go?” was his response.

“I don’t know,”Alice answered.

“Then,” said the cat, “It doesn’t matter.”

It doesn’t matter…wow…what a tragedy. I submit that it does indeed matter. One might have all the skills and desire, but not be able to harness it or make a decision and act. Is this story about choice or direction? Maybe a little of both. More importantly, I feel, this story illustrates the power of purpose.

Purpose to me is the great “why” of the universe. The “why” of my “Retirement Planning for the Multi-Generational Workforce” presentation was simple. I wanted to engage a thought process that will enable everyone to visualize retirement as an eventuality, not just a possibility. Every employee needs to understand that with discipline, consistent contributions, and proper guidance, retirement can and will come to fruition.

With four generations working side by side, there is a need for specialized retirement planning specifically for your individual situation. Each generation has a unique way of seeing and interacting with the universe. Regardless of their approach, the four generations need different action items and respond differently to environmental changes.

Traditionalists were born between 1900 – 1945 and value saving their income coupled with paying cash for goods and services.

  • They represent 5% of the workforce.
  • Traditionalists perceive retirement as a result of 30 years working to retire and then living off their pension/savings. Their immediate financial needs are to keep what they have accumulated through proper distribution strategies. This has never been more evident than in 2008 when personal investments plunged due to the recession.
  • They need income producing investments with a fixed rate of return. Traditionalists will also benefit from having an actual retirement road map that is orchestrated and tracked by a proven financial professional. Healthcare is an important aspect of retirement to consider. Traditionalists need to understand Social Security planning and Medicare implementation.

Baby Boomers were born between 1946 – 1964 and adhered to the buy now pay later mentality.

  • They represent 45% of the workforce. Their biggest obstacle in retirement is the mentality of, “If I retire, who am I?”
  • Most of Boomers identity is from their career, and retirement can seem counter-intuitive to their sense of well-being and worth. With their “buy now pay later” mentality, they need help with debt resolution first and foremost. If you are a Boomer with a mortgage, you might have to continue to work or work part-time in retirement.
  • Baby Boomers need asset protection strategies as well as distribution strategies that will enable them to enjoy an inflation-adjusted income for life. Equity exposure should be at a minimum and they need income generating investments that don’t experience such volatility. Baby Boomers need a proven financial partner to team up and implement and track their financial plan. Social Security and especially Medicare education is a must for Baby Boomers.

Generation X’s were born between 1965 – 1980 and are the first generation not to do as well as their parents.

  • They represent 40% of the workforce and are conservative and cautious with their money. They also save more than the previous two generations.
  • They believe that since they have saved their money, they might retire early to try different experiences and may even change careers in the end. Generation X’s need a portable retirement plan with target date funds, auto-enroll, and automatic increases available. They need strategies in place to mitigate market volatility and education from a trusted financial partner.
  • Equities can be utilized, but they need to be monitored and coupled with some defensive strategies as well. Generation X’s have a better saving rate and could deal with some fixed investment choices to alleviate worry. A proven financial professional is key in keeping Gen X’s on track and motivated. Not surprisingly, Generation X’s need debt management and they need to avoid seeking the bigger, better deal.

Generation Y’s were born between 1981 – 1999 and value individuality.

  • They represent 10% of the workforce and earn to spend.
  • Their financial needs revolve around a need for consistent contributions to their employer-sponsored retirement plan. Active guidance is key to a Gen Y and they require routine feedback. Their financial needs are much like Generation X’s with a portable retirement plan. They would benefit from target date funds, auto-enroll, automatic increases, and a stable rate of return.
  • They are a bit more skeptical of Wall Street and seek a balance between steady growth and explosive returns in their retirement plan. They require flexibility in their financial plan and need active guidance and a regular report on the status of their account. They are very open to education as a tool for achieving their retirement goals.

My knowing smile in the opening of this article emanates from a belief that everyone, regardless of age, can be fiscally responsible. Don’t blame government or the lack of government. Don’t blame your income. Your attitude towards saving is a choice. You choose whether to be wasteful or frugal. Only you can control your spending and saving. If you can’t save for retirement, you don’t have an earning problem, you have a spending problem.

Find a financial partner, live within your means, have an attitude of gratitude and you will be on the road to financial freedom.

 John McPhail was a speaker at CAI’s 2012 Compensation and Benefits Conference. You can contact him at jmcphail@bankofoakridge.com.

4 Benefits of Succession Planning for Your Workforce

Thursday, July 19th, 2012

How would your business perform if your top three employees left your organization tomorrow to join a competitor? What if members of your senior management team parted ways to begin their own businesses? If your CEO became terribly ill and couldn’t perform his duties, would your business continue to run smoothly?

Succession planning is essential for keeping your organization moving in the right direction even when several key members of your staff jump ship, retire or move on for other reasons.  As important as succession planning is, many companies forgo strategizing a plan to retain their best people to eventually take over different roles. Succession planning isn’t a rigorous assignment, but because the efforts of the process aren’t often revealed until a team member leaves, many businesses don’t take the time to start planning.

Deciding the key employees who will ultimately step into leadership and senior management roles is imperative for maintaining business success during any economic climate or business situation. Succession planning is also an office morale and engagement booster. Grooming employees for their future roles by giving them more complex tasks and investing in their growth keeps them focused, motivated and loyal to the company.

Here are four additional reasons to start drafting your organization’s succession plan:

Preparedness

Whether your employees leave to start retirement  life or plan to begin their own businesses, having a succession plan in place will help you more quickly identify which employees will take over your company’s open positions so your business can continue to run as normal.

Less Time and Money

Dedicating time to plan the future of your organization will save your company time and money. Plans to promote and train people within your company means less time spent recruiting for external candidates, interviewing them and checking their references. Money allotted to those efforts will also decrease with a solid succession plan in place.

Weakness is Uncovered

Finding future leaders reveals the strengths within your workforce, but it also uncovers the weaknesses that your organization must work on to secure business and financial growth. Help areas of your company that you discover to be weaker than others by offering training and resources that will help improve performance.

Get a Bird’s Eye View

Evaluating your workforce in preparation for succession planning gives you a great perspective of the talent in your organization. Ascertaining who should fill the shoes of another will help your team better understand the day-to-day happenings of your business. So as you’re planning don’t solely include roles for higher level executives. Incorporate middle managers and their direct reports to create a comprehensive succession plan.

For additional information on the benefits of succession planning or how to develop your company’s plan, please contact a member of CAI’s Advice and Counsel Team at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746.

Photo Source: Victor1558

Is Your Company Prepared for America’s Ageing Workforce?

Thursday, April 12th, 2012

Many labor studies and workforce statistics indicate that the American workforce is ageing. Data from the U.S. Census Bureau shows that 4.6 adults will turn 65 each minute during 2012, and by 2025 that figure will increase to eight adults each minute. Knowing that America is graying rapidly, it is surprising that many employers have not prepared for this demographic change when planning for their future business ventures.

Ignoring reports revealing that baby boomers are interested in working past their retirement age and will stay at companies that offer flexibility will leave your company vulnerable to disorganization and revenue loss. Older workers offer a number of benefits to their employers. They are hardworking, loyal and professional. Older employees also boast vast networks of business contacts and extensive experience in their line of work.

Research shows that many baby boomers have no plans to fully retire and are interested in staying plugged into their career fields. If you’re interested in retaining the company knowledge that your older workers have acquired and the strong work ethics they incorporate into each of their projects, make sure you are keeping their needs in mind when you’re planning for company succession and total rewards packages. Listed below are a few items that older workers would like to see from their employers:

Flexibility

Employees approaching retirement age are not interested in working the typical 40-hour week. An increasing number of companies are receiving requests from their older workers to have more flexible work schedules.  Many workers at this age desire a high-quality of life and would prefer to work part time. To accommodate requests, organizations are implementing a number of measures to achieve productive, part-time schedules. Accommodations include reduced hours, telecommuting and job sharing.

Consulting

Data shows that the US is experiencing a skills gap between available positions and available talent. When older workers retire, they take with them company experience and expertise, which is impossible to replace. For your employees who are contemplating retirement, ask them if they’d be interested in working for the company as a part-time consultant. In this setup, they will be able to reduce their hours and continue to apply their knowledge while your organization still has a valuable and reliable company resource on staff.

Health Plans

A company’s health care plan can be a determining factor on whether an employee decides to retire or stay with his organization. Many older workers may remain in their position longer than they’d like for fear that they’ll lose their health benefits. Feeling trapped in their jobs could result in their disengagement and reduced productivity. Meet with your benefits provider and work to offer a wellness and benefits program that will suit all of your employees, including your older workers.

Don’t lose your high-value talent and the company knowledge they carry with them because of poor workforce planning. If you would like additional information on succession planning or managing an aging workforce, please call a member of CAI’s Advice and Counsel Team at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746.

Photo Source: skilledwork_org