Posts Tagged ‘retention’

6 Workplace Perks Competitive Job Seekers Want from Employers

Tuesday, February 11th, 2014

Business meeting.In order to recruit, secure and retain high-performing employees, companies have to start thinking more competitively in regard to talent. Many companies are doing well as the economy continues to recover. With more companies growing and looking for new employees, highly-qualified job seekers have more freedom to pick and choose the right company for them.

Today’s job seekers believe work/life balance is achievable and will want to work for an employer who agrees. Below are some of the workplace perks top performers will be searching for:

Positive Culture

Your company‘s work environment is a critical factor in determining whether a job candidate accepts an offer or a high-achieving employee decides to stay. Employees want to work for organizations that respect both their work and life obligations. If you would describe your workplace culture as anything but positive, it’s time for your team to make adjustments and consider the number of ways you can increase employee morale and overall job satisfaction.

Flexibility

More job seekers are looking to work at companies that offer flexibility, and with more access to technology, working remotely is becoming an option for many employees. There isn’t a one-size-fits-all solution when it comes to flexibility, but there are several options including: arriving late, leaving early, working from home, four-day work weeks, etc. Finding ways to make sure business gets done while your employees are content is now easier than ever before.

Empowerment

Allowing your employees to feel empowered is a win for them and a win for you. People don’t want to feel powerless. Giving your employees autonomy in their roles will help them feel a greater sense of accomplishment and satisfaction. You’ll also be able to cross more items off your do-to list when you give your employees more power. Delegating authority and trusting employees are qualities a well-trained manager should possess.

Opportunities for Growth

Your high-performing employees and enthusiastic job candidates want to work for a company with goals that align with their goals. Be open to discussing growth opportunities with your current staffers and those who may be joining your team. Opportunities for a promotion, raise or special project are likely to keep your staff members engaged. Employees want to know whether or not there is an open path for growth for them at your company.

Receive and Give Feedback

Receiving consistent positive and constructive feedback is essential for keeping your employees engaged. When employees don’t receive feedback, several negative repercussions can occur, such as employee frustration, bad manager-direct report relationships, or employees leaving. Your team members want to know that they are valued. So in addition to offering them feedback, you should also request their feedback on different company decisions. Whether it’s their job structure, a company wellness incentive or a new employee in the department, asking for their feedback shows that you fin them and their opinions valuable.

Continual Learning

A cost-effective way to increase job satisfaction at your organization is to provide your employees with additional training and education that will benefit their careers. Investing in your employees means that you are also investing in your company. Here are some inexpensive ways to help your employees and new hires continue to learn information from their fields: Encourage them to join professional groups and associations, set up a company mentor program, purchase subscriptions to industry-related literature, or sign them up for professional training.

For additional help on retaining employees or increasing company loyalty, please call a member of CAI’s Advice and Counsel Team at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746.

Photo Source: Passive Income Dream.Com

6 Actions You Need to Take to Find and Retain High-Performing Employees

Thursday, January 16th, 2014

Two businesspeople holding briefcases outdoorsAccording to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the country’s unemployment rate has dropped to 7 percent as of November 2013. Over the last year, the unemployment rate has continued to decline and the overall economy is continuing to slowly improve. With these positive economic signs, employers will need to be competitive in order to obtain high-performing employees for their organization.

Because the economy is improving, talented job candidates have more organizations to choose from when looking for a new position. Employers must make their company stand out. There are several steps your organization can take to ensure you’re appealing to hardworking individuals. Take the six actions below to get stellar job seekers onboard at your company:

Quicker recruiting

Employers may be losing great candidates if their recruiting and decision-making processes are lengthy. As competition increases for a smaller pool of job seekers, applicants will grow tired of waiting for next steps in the hiring process with their company of choice and accept a position at an another organization simply because the process moved faster. Ensure this doesn’t happen by communicating with your candidates every step of the way. Don’t make rush decisions that may result in a bad hire, but do avoid any roadblocks in your system. Be prepared to make a decision.

Pay competitively

Be prepared to offer higher compensation and stronger benefits as the economy improves. Do not make the common mistake of overlooking or devaluing the importance of pay to your employees’ motivation. If you want to attract qualified applicants to your open positions, provide a base pay that is at or above market rates.

Challenging assignments

Boredom is one of the fastest ways to have your employees look for a new job. There is little or no excitement for an employee that performs the same routine day-to-day. Even though mundane tasks need to be completed, make sure your top employees are participating in interesting projects that provide them with a challenge.

Offer flexibility

Top-tier job candidates are looking for flexibility, and your competitors are probably already offering it as an attractive, non-compensation-related perk to help reel them in. Options, such as working from home and customized schedules, can make one job opportunity more appealing than another.

Opportunities for growth

Your high-performing employees and energetic job candidates want to work for a company with goals that align with their goals. Be open to discussing growth opportunities with your current staff and those that may be joining your team soon. Chances for a promotion, raise or special project are likely to keep your staff members engaged.

Positive acknowledgement

A good way to retain your best-performing employees is to create a culture that embraces praise and recognition. Confirmation of a strong performance is a great way to show your employees that you see the hard work they put in and that you value all of it. By publicly acknowledging the achievements of your staff, you remind individuals of their own personal value to the organization and that’s critical for keeping them engaged.

For additional help with recruiting and retaining employees, please call a member of CAI’s Advice and Resolution Team at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746.

Photo Source: The-Lane-Team

 

Create a Succession Plan to Accurately Predict Your Company’s Future

Tuesday, July 2nd, 2013

July Quote Blog 2013

Alan Kay, the father of the personal computer said, “The best way to predict the future is to invent it.”

What does the future of your organization look like? How will your organization proceed in the next five or ten years? If you don’t have the answers, you should get started on inventing your future now. The best way to do that is with a succession plan.

Maintaining business success in the years to come depends on whether your current leadership team creates a plan outlining which of your top-performing employees will step into leadership and newly created roles when the appropriate time comes. The retirement of one of your top managers or a decision of permanent maternity leave from a key specialist are examples of why succession planning is critical for keeping your business running smoothly. Review the advantages of succession planning in more detail here: http://blog.capital.org/4-benefits-of-succession-planning-for-your-workforce/.

Succession planning is hard to complete if you can’t pinpoint key employees who can take over high-profile positions in your company when the time comes. Retaining hardworking employees is essential to foretelling your company’s future.  If you’re having trouble holding on to your company’s stars, you may need to revise your retention strategy. Here are some tips that can help you decrease turnover and increase loyalty among your workforce: http://blog.capital.org/dont-let-your-top-employees-leave-4-tips-to-encourage-employee-loyalty/.

Creating a succession plan is an involved process that should include your senior leadership team and have input from the heads of all of your business departments. The goal of your succession plan is to identify, recruit and prepare your talented employees for important company positions they will eventually lead. Succession plans can vary based on the size and industry of an organization. However, most plans share several basic strategies. Check them out here: http://blog.capital.org/basic-strategies-for-succession-planning/.

For more information and additional tips on succession planning, please contact a member of CAI’s Advice and Counsel Team at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746,

**Workplace Insights will take a break for the Independence Day holiday. New posts will return next Tuesday, July 9. Please have a happy and safe holiday!

CAI’s HR Management Conference Will Help You Put the Pieces of Your Talent Puzzle Together

Tuesday, December 11th, 2012

The competition for top talent is fierce as organizations require more specialized skills from their workforce. In order to secure top talent, employers should spend adequate time searching and hiring candidates that possess strong interpersonal skills and a desire to grow and achieve success.  

Excellent talent will be increasingly difficult to maintain in the current business climate’s competitive atmosphere. CAI’s 2013 HR Management Conference will equip you with information and strategies to hold on to your best people, as well as attract new talent. Scheduled for March 6 and March 7 at Raleigh’s McKimmon Center, the conference will help you put the pieces of your talent puzzle together to develop a positive culture that reaches its business goals.

Four keynote speakers will address participants at the early March conference:

  1. Daniel Pink will reveal why traditional approaches to high performance backfire at most organizations and will offer alternative solutions.
  2. Demographic trends show that pretty soon your workforce is going to look different, work different and want to be rewarded differently. Dr. James Johnson will help you prepare.
  3. Based on his best-selling book, The Energy Bus, Jon Gordon presents a powerful roadmap to overcome life and work obstacles and bring out the best in yourself and your team.
  4. In his presentation, Dave Rendall will help you find the strengths hidden in your workforce and explore eight strategies for improving employee engagement at your organization.

Conference attendees will also have the opportunity to participate in several breakout sessions. Topics include:

–Performance, Development and Succession: The Foundation of Talent Management

–15 Reasons You May Have a Shortage of Skilled Labor and What to Do About It

–Learning Agility: The Defining Competency for Working (and Thriving) at the Speed of Light

–Strategies for Developing and Changing the Leadership Culture

CAI will announce the winners of the 2013 Ovation Awards for HR Excellence at the HR Management Conference. There is still time to submit a nomination if your company has implemented an HR/People practice that has brought success to the organization. Deadline is Friday, December 14.

Please visit www.capital.org/hrconf to review the programs full agenda, descriptions about the presentations and speakers, and to register. Everyone who registers for the conference by the end of the day on Thursday, December 13 will be entered into a drawing to win a new iPad with retina display. Register today! Please call 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746 with any questions.

4 Steps for Building Positive Employer-Employee Relationships

Tuesday, August 21st, 2012

Aiming to create a strong employer-employee relationship within your organization is commendable.  Many positive results arise when employers and their workers respect and trust each other. But getting to the point of reciprocal trust and respect can be challenging for many companies. Some businesses fear giving their employees too much buy-in or power. Other organizations don’t realize that there are several actions they can take to make their workplace run smoother.

A good employer-employee relationship requires constant nurturing and set expectations and results. Although hard work from both sides of the company is needed, the benefits are worth it. Here are some of the top advantages: increased morale and job satisfaction, high retention rate, less absenteeism, better customer service and higher quality products.

Utilize the following practices in your organization to see your employer-employee relationship flourish:

Communicate Openly

Good communication between an employer and its employees is imperative for building a positive workplace culture. As an employer, don’t hide important information from your staff or only grant the information to a select group of workers. Being aware of how the company is performing and what projects are getting started help employees see how their role fits into the organization; it also makes them more likely to respect and trust their company. Always keep your team members in the loop.

Gratitude and Appreciation

Saying “please” and “thank you” go a long way at an organization. Be empathetic to your workforce and appreciate the efforts that they contribute to your company. When an employee consistently turns in great work yet receives no recognition, you can be sure that his job satisfaction and morale is low. He might even consider finding a company that does appreciate his work. To make this scenario unrealistic at your workplace, be grateful for the work your employees do and show your appreciation through public or private recognition, parties, gift cards or whatever else would appeal to your team.

Consistent Feedback

In order to improve their work performance, an employee must receive feedback, both positive and critical. Employees find it frustrating when their work has been changed or a project isn’t approved but receive no feedback as to why these actions have happened. Help your employees grow by offering them frequent feedback on their work. Set up monthly or weekly meetings to check in with them about their progress and what goals they want to accomplish. When you take these steps, you’ll see your employees more engaged with their work.

Following Through

Nothing makes you lose credibility faster than when you overpromise and don’t deliver expected results. No matter what the scenario is, as an employer, you owe it to your staff to follow through on your commitments. If you told one employee they can attend a training to improve their skills, quickly approve the expense report when they turn it in. If another employee wants to meet with you to discuss her future at the company, don’t blow her off for another meeting or lunch date. Evoke trust and respect from your staff by showing that your commitment to them is important.

For more tips on creating positive work relationships, please call a member of CAI’s Advice and Counsel Team at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746.

Photo Source: Victor1558

Don’t Let Your Top Employees Leave: 4 Tips to Encourage Employee Loyalty

Thursday, August 2nd, 2012

Do you know what it would take for your employees to leave your organization? If you ask them, the responses you receive might surprise you. The responses will also provide you with valuable information. Knowing the circumstances that could cause your employees to leave will help you find areas in which your company can improve. Instead of finding the answers when your employees leave your company, find time now to ask your top talent what factors would drive them to move to another organization.

Before you ask your staff members what would make them leave, review some of the reasons below why employees stay at their organizations. Are you providing your employees with these opportunities?

4 Reasons Why Employees Stay Loyal

Company Culture

The environment your company creates is a major factor that determines whether an employee will stay. Not every employee will appreciate or desire the same workplace aspects so it’s important to make sure you’re hiring employees that are interested in your company culture. For the most part, employees want to work for companies that respect their work/life balance and take a genuine interest in them and their career.

Challenging Work and Career Growth

Employees who are growing in their positions and like what they do find it hard to leave their employers. Make sure your staff members don’t leave because of workplace boredom, meaning their assignments aren’t challenging them. Meet with your employees on a weekly or monthly basis to gauge their thoughts on their job assignments and related performance. Help your team members grow by offering them opportunities to strengthen their skills, learn more information, and work on larger or more important projects.

Sound Leadership

Leadership is a top reason why employees decide to hold a long tenure with an organization. Many employee opinion surveys reveal that employees leave or are likely to leave because of the actions of their managers, supervisors or senior leaders. No one likes a micromanager or a leader who never checks in. Treat your employees with respect, be considerate of their time, communicate openly with them, and in return they will more likely stick with your organization.

Feedback and Recognition

Receiving positive and constructive feedback consistently is critical for the success of your employees. When employees don’t receive feedback, several consequences can result—employees feel frustrated, bad manager-direct report relationships develop, or employees search for new jobs that fulfill their needs. In addition to constant feedback, workers want to know that they are valued for the work they put into the company. Regularly demonstrate that you appreciate your workforce’s efforts. Whether you send them an email congratulating them on a sales win or take them out to eat on Friday, make it clear that they’re valuable team members.

For additional guidance for retaining your key employees, please call a member of CAI’s Advice and Counsel Team at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746.

Photo Source: Victor1558

4 Tips to Help Your Employees Succeed Through a Merger or Acquisition

Thursday, July 12th, 2012

Several ideas pop into the minds of employees when they learn that their company is planning a merger or acquisition with another organization. Staff members worry about being laid off, not getting salary increases and competing with unknown talent. Their anxiety for the workplace transition reveals itself in their assignments and interactions with their coworkers. Managers often have several battles to deal with as they try to control emotional employees and dispel nonsensical rumors.

Mishandling this sensitive process can affect your business negatively. Absenteeism, loss of key employees, low morale and low productivity are some of the damaging consequences for not addressing a merger or acquisition appropriately.

Preparation is imperative for keeping your organization composed. The following four tips should help your organization navigate through the transition of a merger or acquisition with less difficulty:

1. Make Leadership Present

Forming a strong leadership team with members from both sides of the merger or acquisition will help smooth out the kinks of the transition. When both sides align to share the same vision, mission and strategy, employees have a solid support team to turn to. Before the transition is announced, make sure you indentify the key leadership players and begin to strategize steps to handle the change gracefully.

2. Communicate Often and Through Several Channels

To combat rumors and twisted facts, create a solid communications plan for your employees, leadership and other key stakeholders, such as customers and board members. Remember that your employees will want to know more than the details of the merger. They’ll want to know how their job will be affected, what their benefits will look like and who will manage them. Cascade messages through a variety of channels to ensure your stakeholders receive them. Additionally, practice two-way communication and readily take questions and suggestions from your team members.

3. Align Culture and Business Processes

A merger or acquisition requires the blending of two companies with distinct cultures and ways of completing work. Similar to your communications plan, knowing how you want to cultivate your organization’s environment early on will help you get your workforce on board. Carefully plan your new business processes before the transition takes effect. Educate your staff on the new changes and how they might affect their workflows. Communication is again important when telling employees that aspects of their job could be significantly altered. Always keep them in the loop.

4. Take Care of Employees

Agreeing to merge with or acquire another organization may benefit your company financially, but it could hurt other areas of your business, specifically your talent. News of a merger or acquisition can leave even your star performers feeling nervous about their fate and the new set of employees they’ll have to work with. The period before the official transition is a great time for competitors to pluck your top talent. Prevent this from happening by involving your staff through the transition process and getting them to understand how their role will fit into the changing organization. Develop a retention strategy, such as stay-bonuses or packages, to make sure your stellar staffers don’t become enticed by competition.  For employees you won’t be able to retain, let them leave the organization with dignity. Provide them with services to help them stay on their feet, such as resume reviewing. Additionally, show them that you appreciated their service by offering them a generous severance package.

For additional strategies to assist your workforce through a merger or acquisition, please contact a member of CAI’s Advice and Counsel Team at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746.

Photo Souce: Victor1558

Why Your Employees Want to Leave and How You Can Prevent Their Departure

Thursday, May 24th, 2012

Losing a top-performing employee significantly impacts an organization. Research indicates that the search to find, hire and train a replacement costs more than a third of the new hire’s salary. Not only do you experience financial implications from the loss of top talent, but your culture could also be affected. The former employee takes his knowledge and skills with him, leaving his remaining coworkers left to pick up the slack from his open position. Heavier workloads can cause stress, decreasing job satisfaction and employee morale for your other team members.

Identifying the reasons why an employee might consider leaving is key in preventing attrition. Contrary to what many leaders believe, money is not the sole or even top motivator for an employee. Many factors contribute to an employee’s decision to leave his current workplace. Some factors are out of your control, but you can heavily influence many. Here are some of the top reasons employees leave their organizations:

  • Demanding positions—long days and working on the weekends
  • Boredom—not enough challenges to keep engagement
  • Inadequate compensation—raises are currently frozen or given to someone less qualified
  • Management disorganization—constant turnover and restructuring in several departments
  • Few opportunities—having little input on decisions cause feelings of unimportance
  • Too competitive—rewarding internal competitiveness instead of cooperation
  • Lack of recognition—feelings of not being valued ignite from infrequent to no acknowledgement

Here are steps you can take to retain your workforce:

  • Set goals—help employees stay motivated by giving them something to work towards
  • Empower them—allow them to lead and don’t micromanage their efforts
  • Show you care—take time to get to know your employee’s life outside and inside of work
  • Offer training—opportunities to gain more knowledge and develop new skills increases engagement
  • Constant feedback—let them know which tasks they’re doing well and which need improvement
  • Be appreciative—thank employees and make sure you frequently let them know they’re valued
  • Give perks—if you can’t offer a raise,  pay for lunch every Friday or grant flexible schedules

For more strategies to retain your top talent, please call a member of CAI’s Advice and Counsel Team at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746.

Photo Source: Victor1558

March Madness and the Workplace: Comparing Your Employees with the Big Dance’s 68 Teams

Tuesday, March 13th, 2012

 

Talking about teamwork in the workplace is fitting now that March Madness officially starts this evening. Whether the team you cheer for made it to this year’s Big Dance, the dynamics of the 3-week NCAA tournament offer you good tips to execute when engaging different players within your workforce team. Knowing how to use your people’s strongest assets will help you improve employee satisfaction and business productivity at your organization.

The college basketball event has its own terminology, and the nicknames they assign to teams can also apply to employees in your organization.  Read the following March Madness tags and their definitions to see how staffers with similar characteristics can be coached to create a championship team.

March Madness in the Workplace:

On the Bubble: Teams on the fringe of making it to the college basketball national tournament. They earn one final chance to show that they deserve to be in the competition.

Workplace Counterpart: Employees who are on the bubble at your organization have talent and know-how to be extraordinary teammates, but their overall records indicate that they aren’t strong competitors. Work with them to identify their strengths and weaknesses to ensure that they are the right fit for your company. If they are, offer these employees positive and constructive feedback frequently. Help them use their strengths to accomplish their career goals.

 

Cinderella: A team that no one expects to play big at the dance but advances in the tournament anyway.

Workplace Counterpart: Don’t underestimate your office Cinderellas. They are dedicated to doing their jobs well and aren’t afraid to work through any obstacles that they may face. Give them assignments that match their talents, and you won’t be disappointed with the results they bring you. Recognize their contributions by praising them, and you’ll see that they’ll become more confident and productive in their decision making.

 

The Elite Eight: These are the tournament’s final eight teams. They’ve shown their expertise and finesse for the game to remain in the competition.

Workplace Counterpart: Your elite employees are engaged and make great contributions to your organization each work day. You can count on them to encourage other team members to perform well and give their all when completing projects. Because they always bring their A-game to assignments, some managers might take their excellent work ethic for granted. Continually give them feedback and ask them what they hope to accomplish to make sure they remain satisfied in their positions.

 

The Final Four: These teams have fought hard to prove that they have the talent to be national champions. They are the best of the best of the 68 teams invited to the Big Dance. Their workload increases as they play for the last two spots and eventually the national championship title.

Workplace Counterpart: Your employees who are similar to college basketball’s final four are determined to make a difference at your organization. They are your company’s top performers who steadily produce high-quality work. These employees aren’t afraid to challenge traditions or explore new options for getting things done efficiently. Keep these staff members engaged by assigning them a variety of projects that showcase their expertise and passion for achieving big results. Treat these employees well by offering them promotions or raises that indicate you acknowledge their efforts. They will remain loyal and help get your company through tough business situations.

For additional ideas on engaging the different staff members that make up your workforce team, please call a member of CAI’s Advice and Counsel Team at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746.

Photo Source: katerha

Here’s What You Missed at CAI’s 2012 HR Management Conference

Thursday, March 1st, 2012

CAI hosted its annual HR Management Conference last week on February 21 and February 22. More than 380 HR professionals and company executives attended the event themed Crushing Your Competition with Your Culture & Talent.

Jack Daly delivering his keynote presentation.

Held at the McKimmon Center in Raleigh, the conference featured four keynote speakers. Each of them provided audience members with helpful tips to create a positive and productive workplace to keep employees happy and engaged. Listed below are the four keynote speakers and their presentation topics:

  • Jack DalyCorporate Culture: Is Yours by Design or Default?
  • Jeff TobeColoring Outside the Lines: Let’s Get Engaged
  • Michael Lorsch—The Five Dysfunctions of a Team
  • Kelly Swanson—How to Stand Up and Stick Out in a Crowded Market

“I’m actually the vice president of our operations company, and in my daily work what was really important to clarify is the dilemma between important and urgent. You do urgent things every day, but you don’t necessarily do the important things. This has direct impact not only to my world, but more importantly to the world of my people and the company culture they experience ,” said Max Henze, Vice President of AKG North America Operations when commenting on information from Jack Daly’s keynote session.

In addition to the keynote presentations, conference goers had the opportunity to participate in several breakout sessions hosted by leaders experienced in company culture and strategies to retain top talent. The 12 breakout sessions utilized role plays, surveys and real-world examples to help participants absorb concepts to take back and incorporate at their organizations.  Here are a few of the topics discussed during the sessions:

  • You’re Ruining Our Culture: How to Deal with Toxic Behavior in the Workplace
  • High Value Talent: How to Capture and Keep Them
  • Creating a Competitive Advantage with a Strong Corporate Culture
  • How to Influence Positive Leadership Behaviors that Impact Your Culture
  • Building Your Talent Pipeline
  • Coaching Supervisors and Managers to Solve Their Own People Problems

“I came primarily for the cultural enhancement of organizations. My organization has had some phenomenal growth over the last four years, and we’d like to position ourselves to be the employer of choice so to speak,” said Keith Workman, Vice President of Human Resources at Implus Footcare, when asked why he attended the conference. “With the speakers, Mr. Daly and of course Brad Geiger, who is superb, I noticed that they were focusing on cultural development, how to identify problem areas and ways to avoid them, so that was a very big draw for me.”

CAI CEO Bruce Clarke with the 2012 Ovation Awards Winners

CAI revealed the winners of its sixth annual Ovation Awards for HR Excellence on Day 2 of the conference. Local employers are encouraged to submit nominations year round for an innovative people practice they initiated at their company. The people practice must have made a significant and positive impact on employees and business results to win one of the three awards segmented by company size. This year’s winners include:

  • Caterpillar Building Construction Products Division in the Large Employer Category
  • Halifax Regional Medical Center in the Mid-Size Employer Category
  • Pate Dawson Company in the Small Employer Category

Leaders from the three winning companies presented their innovative people practices to conference attendees in small breakout sessions after the awards ceremony. Caterpillar presented on its workplace flexibility initiative, Halifax Regional Medical Center discussed its fast-tracking hiring process and Pate Dawson Company shared its high performance workplace training program.

Participants also received notebooks packed with information from each of the keynote speakers and presenters of the breakout sessions. The conference provided opportunities for guests to personally speak with each presenter and network with more than 380 of their peers.

When asked about his thoughts on this year’s conference, Keith said, “Oh it’s excellent, and it always is. I’m never disappointed.”

If you are interested in attending CAI’s next HR Management Conference in 2013, please contact an Account Manager at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746.