Posts Tagged ‘retain’

4 Steps to Motivate and Retain Top Employees with Professional Development

Tuesday, June 23rd, 2015

Professional DevelopmentMany organizations believe that increasing salary is the most effective way to retain their stellar performers. Although higher salaries might keep employees at their jobs, it is not always a cost-effective solution for employers. To help staff members remain content without maxing out budgets, companies can devote time to staff development and education.

Employees stay in their positions when they believe they are accomplishing their goals and advancing in their careers. Showing serious interest in the development of your staff demonstrates to employees that they are essential in achieving success for the company. Support within management to invest in workforce coaching will help your organization attain a lower turnover rate and strengthen employee morale.

The entire organization benefits when time and resources are allotted to professional growth and job preparation. Employees are satisfied and become more productive, which leads to increased efficiency and greater revenue. Here are four actions you can take to promote the growth of your team members:

Help staff set goals.

Have employees evaluate their responsibilities to determine their strengths and weaknesses prior to setting goals. Help them establish obtainable goals that align with their interests and strengths to support success. Goals should be measurable, and a timeline can track progress.  Personally praise employees when goals are achieved.

Inform employees on training opportunities.

Alert team members of different training and educational opportunities available that are beneficial to their position and encourage them to participate. Offer to sponsor their attendance for different activities, such as conferences and seminars. If sponsoring is too expensive, partial payment still exhibits your vested interest in their career.

Encourage membership in professional groups and associations.

Organizations relevant to employees’ positions allow them to network with similar professionals, learn best practices and even gain new clients. To help facilitate their involvement, consider providing them annual stipends to partake in group activities related to their fields or reimbursing membership dues and other fees. Provide flexibility in scheduling and options to work nontraditional hours to allow employees to attend events as well.

Recognize training progress.

Employees need positive reinforcement when they continually perform their duties well. By attending training sessions, they invest in their career development as well as benefit the organization, so it is important to acknowledge their efforts. Take time to discuss what they learned from their experiences, and advocate that they integrate new knowledge into their responsibilities. Congratulating team members on earning certifications also promotes company loyalty.

Members of management should consider training options for themselves as well in order to set positive examples for all employees. Company leaders should also explain the value of continual education and professional development during staff gatherings or one-on-one meetings.

For more information on staff development and professional training, please contact a member of CAI’s Advice and Resolution Team at (919) 878-9222 or (336) 668-7746.



Attract Top Talent with Your Employee Value Proposition

Tuesday, May 26th, 2015

employee value propositionYour Employee Value Proposition (EVP) is a critical tool in your efforts to attract top talent and keep your best employees.  Think of your EVP as the elements that would make up the second half of this sentence spoken by one of your employees, “I give my time, talents, best effort, ideas for making things better and drive to succeed to (fill in your company name) and in turn I get…”

These should be your key selling points when you are talking to great candidates and when you are reminding your employees why they continue to make the good decision to stay with your organization.

The Corporate Executive Board has released data demonstrating the importance of the EVP.  An attractive EVP can reduce the compensation premium needed to hire top talent by 50 percent.  An effective EVP enables an organization to improve the commitment of employees by up to 37 percent.

Now let’s be clear, I realize not every employer can have Google-level perks.  But you need to concentrate on the key things that differentiate you as an employer against the other companies with which you compete for talent.

Here are a few areas where you can differentiate:

  • Pay
  • Health insurance benefits
  • Vacation and paid time off
  • Work-life balance or blend
  • A clear organizational purpose/mission
  • Meaningful work
  • Career development and learning opportunities
  • Positive work environment
  • Autonomy
  • Big goals and a driven workforce

It’s not just one thing that makes a difference.  And despite the fact that I listed pay first, that is only one piece.  Many people would be more than happy to take the average wage for their role to work in a great environment where they are well respected, with a great work-life balance and the chance to make meaningful contributions.

Evaluate your organization’s EVP.  If you are not sure what it is, ask a group of your best employees.  Capture it.  Put it on paper.

Now think about the audience who you want to be able to attract and keep at your organization.  Do research on that group.  Does your EVP match up to what’s important to them in an employer?  If not, what do you need to change to make your organization a more attractive destination for them?

An important point is that you need to make sure your EVP aligns with the wants and needs of the talent you want to attract and keep.  If it doesn’t, you are investing money in the wrong things.  Reevaluate the situation and make choices based on what you know about your audience.

Having a well-formulated EVP based on strategic choices you’ve made as an employer will give you an advantage over your competition for talent.  If you haven’t already developed a clear EVP, now is the time to do so.

At CAI, we are happy to talk you through this and all of your other HR issues and opportunities.  Feel free to give our Advice & Resolution team a call at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746.

Why Your Employees Want to Leave and How You Can Prevent Their Departure

Thursday, May 24th, 2012

Losing a top-performing employee significantly impacts an organization. Research indicates that the search to find, hire and train a replacement costs more than a third of the new hire’s salary. Not only do you experience financial implications from the loss of top talent, but your culture could also be affected. The former employee takes his knowledge and skills with him, leaving his remaining coworkers left to pick up the slack from his open position. Heavier workloads can cause stress, decreasing job satisfaction and employee morale for your other team members.

Identifying the reasons why an employee might consider leaving is key in preventing attrition. Contrary to what many leaders believe, money is not the sole or even top motivator for an employee. Many factors contribute to an employee’s decision to leave his current workplace. Some factors are out of your control, but you can heavily influence many. Here are some of the top reasons employees leave their organizations:

  • Demanding positions—long days and working on the weekends
  • Boredom—not enough challenges to keep engagement
  • Inadequate compensation—raises are currently frozen or given to someone less qualified
  • Management disorganization—constant turnover and restructuring in several departments
  • Few opportunities—having little input on decisions cause feelings of unimportance
  • Too competitive—rewarding internal competitiveness instead of cooperation
  • Lack of recognition—feelings of not being valued ignite from infrequent to no acknowledgement

Here are steps you can take to retain your workforce:

  • Set goals—help employees stay motivated by giving them something to work towards
  • Empower them—allow them to lead and don’t micromanage their efforts
  • Show you care—take time to get to know your employee’s life outside and inside of work
  • Offer training—opportunities to gain more knowledge and develop new skills increases engagement
  • Constant feedback—let them know which tasks they’re doing well and which need improvement
  • Be appreciative—thank employees and make sure you frequently let them know they’re valued
  • Give perks—if you can’t offer a raise,  pay for lunch every Friday or grant flexible schedules

For more strategies to retain your top talent, please call a member of CAI’s Advice and Counsel Team at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746.

Photo Source: Victor1558

10 Ways to Retain and Motivate Your High-Performing Employees

Tuesday, February 28th, 2012

Businesses that want to see success as the economy continues to improve should keep a close eye on their top talent. If your star employees don’t feel like they’re getting the most out of their jobs or feel that they’re underappreciated, you can assume that they’re looking for enticing opportunities elsewhere. High retention rates indicate that an organization is doing well in employee engagement, but a strong retention rate also means success in other business areas, such as sales and customer satisfaction.

Implementing the 10 tips below will encourage your high-performing talent to stick around and help create success for your company:

1. Conduct Stay Interviews

Instead of using exit interviews to find out why employees leave your organization, ask the employees that are still around what would make them leave your organization. Use this information to transform inefficient processes, raise morale and increase your retention rate.

2. Be Specific with Job Descriptions

People often leave a company after a short period of time because they were unaware of all the responsibilities that their new position held. To prevent short stints with new hires, spell out all of the duties—bad or good—required for your open positions.

3. Teach Managers People Management

Employees often cite their managers as the main reason they left or are planning to leave an organization. Spend adequate time training managers with direct reports proper ways to handle employee relations issues.

4. Communicate Openly

Information that is confidential or intended for a select group of people doesn’t have to be shared with the entire staff. However, frequently sharing information on company health, financials and major decisions with your workforce will keep them informed and engaged, which will help them remain loyal.

5. Promote Flexibility

Today’s employees view workplace flexibility as a necessary element in a total rewards package instead of as an added perk. If your employees can work from home a few days per week or start their days earlier or later depending on traffic, let them.  They will show you more respect if you trust them to get their work done.

6. Give Clear Expectations

Be specific when assigning your team members projects. Give them clear expectations the first time so you both are satisfied with the end product. Taking this step well lessen confusion, frustration and unsatisfactory results.

7. Help them Grow

Providing your staff members with different opportunities to increase their industry knowledge or to strengthen their technical and soft skills will show them that you are willing to invest in their future. Send them to training programs or promote them to different positions to help them grow.

8. Manage Poor Performers

Poor performers with bad attitudes are not good company for star employees to keep. Poor performers can drain energy, happiness and productivity from your top employees. Make sure you address issues caused by poor performers immediately to maintain a positive workplace for each of your employees.

9. Involve Senior Leadership

Company leaders are always busy, but they are never too busy to allot some time to their employees. Encourage your senior leaders to leave their offices and mingle with their workforce. Have them meet new hires and sit in on departmental meetings. Making them present in the office will eliminate an “us” versus “them” mentality that some staffers may have if they never see their senior leaders.

10. Show Them They’re  Valued

Employees who feel that their contributions matter to their organization are more likely to be productive and give their company a long-term commitment. Make your staff members feel appreciated by giving them constructive and positive feedback on their assignments and professional development. Often ask for their opinions on company decisions, and take time to get to know them personally.

For additional information or strategies to keep your top talent loyal to your organization, please call a member of CAI’s Advice and Counsel Team at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746.

Photo Source: Victor1558