Posts Tagged ‘recruiting tools’

Using Professional Associations as a Recruiting Tool

Thursday, April 28th, 2016

Social and professional online networking has quickly become an important tool in the Human Resources arsenal for connecting with a larger pool of passive candidates for future job openings. Often, recruiters can narrow their search within these tools by focusing on specific groups or associations to which these candidates may belong or are following.

Using_Associations_for_Recruiting

There are a number of professional associations that focus either on a specific industry or role common across all industry verticals. Many of these associations are large enough to have a national following, with local chapters having regular discussions and expanding membership. Typically, such associations can be divided into one of two groups, functional and technical. Some examples are:

Functional Associations:

  • AAA (American Accounting Association)
    For Accountants, Finance Specialists, Controllers, etc.
  • AMA (American Marketing Association)
    Dedicated to serving the educational and professional needs of marketing professionals
  • CSCMP (Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals)
    Worldwide professional association dedicated to the advancement and dissemination of research and knowledge on supply chain management
  • CAI (Capital Associated Industries)
    For members of CAI, we offer the opportunity to post to our job boards, through myCAI, our members only online community which reaches 2,700+ HR and business professionals throughout North Carolina.
  • SHRM (Society for Human Resource Management)
    Largest organization for HR professionals including HR Generalists, HR Managers, HR Diversity, HR Business Partners, Compensation, Benefits, Employee Relations, and University Relations

Technical Associations:

  • ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers)
    Known for Mechanical Engineering, but also collaboration, knowledge sharing and skill development across all engineering disciplines, standards, and certifications
  • INCOSE (International Council on Systems Engineering)
    Dedicated to the advancement of systems engineering
  • IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers)
    The largest engineering association in the world with a focus in Electrical and IT/Systems Engineering

Professional recruiters can identify such associations by talking with their existing employees to determine which groups exist and, more importantly, to separate the more “serious” groups from those that may be less organized or less followed.

From here, recruiters can use such group memberships to zero in on their top passive candidates and perhaps engage them directly regarding a current job opening. Proactively, recruiters can begin to assemble a pool of passive candidates to approach with future job openings.

For example, you could add to your search criteria the phrasing “cscmp OR Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals”. Add to this the words “bio OR profile” to eliminate job postings and get the equivalent of a resume or CV. Finally, incorporate “manufacturing OR materials” in order to target specific areas of industry.

Proficiency in mining exactly the results you are looking for will allow you to get the jump on your competition, undoubtedly looking for the same type of candidates in much the same way. By narrowing your search the first time, you can make direct contact more quickly and start a rapport that could lead to the hiring of top talent for your organization.

Candidates with similar skill sets tend to hang out with each other and travel in the same circles. This tendency to form tight bonds with each other, promote online discussions and participate in online associations can be used to your advantage as a recruiter.

renee

Renee Watkins is on  CAI’s Advice & Resolution Team.   A seasoned HR professional with practical hands-on experience in various human resource functions, Renee provides solutions to retain and motivate outstanding workforces.  She also specializes in counseling and advising management for best practices, processes and strategies to support employee morale and organizational effectiveness.

Using Effective Recruiting Sources

Thursday, January 28th, 2016

sources

In today’s post, Advice and Resolution team member Renee’ Watkins shares the findings of a CareerBuilder survey that reveals where employers should be wisely spending their resources on recruiting sources.

According to a CareerBuilder survey of over 1,600 of their clients, job candidates, on average, use eighteen (18) sources when looking for a new job.  Understanding which of these sources are used most often will give employers insight as to where to invest their recruiting time on job posting sources.

Most companies typically do the same things when it comes to getting the word out regarding job openings.  There are employee referrals, internal databases, job boards, etc.  No secrets or surprises here.  So, which sources are having the most success?

Forty-three percent (43%) of those surveyed find the most success posting on Job Boards.  Thirty-two percent (32%) find the most success by posting on Career Sites. Seven percent (7%) have more successful hires coming from Employee Referrals and two percent (2%) are more successful recruiting candidates through an Agency.  Other sources combined to make up the remaining 16%.

However, according to Leadership IQ’s latest research, the most successful companies are finding their best people in what they call “The Underground Job Market” through employee referrals and networking.

As an employer, now that you have this information, what can you learn from it?  In order to ensure the best possible formula for recruiting success, an organization must have a multi-faceted strategy for sourcing candidates.  An internal database, or pool, of qualified candidates you have already spoken with and vetted is one of your best sources.

However, you should also make sure you post openings on targeted job boards and career sites.  This will attract candidates for your current opening. Establish an employee referral program which rewards employees for finding and recruiting qualified candidates for an opening.  This will encourage participation and engagement from your existing employees, as well as serve to preserve your corporate culture.  People are prone to associate with and recruit people who they are most compatible with.

A single approach to recruiting is not enough to make you successful.  There will be specialty jobs which require very targeted approaches, including perhaps the support of an agency.   There will also be jobs requiring a certain level of soft skills in addition to education and experience.  For these, you may find yourself “smiling-and-dialing” to locate the right candidate.

Lastly, there are two important considerations to remember when putting these strategies to use.  The first is, a recruiting technology is only as good as the people who use them.  Make sure your team is well-trained on getting the most use out of career sites and job boards.  As with any technology, if you do not use it correctly, it will not work for you.  The second thing to remember is to accurately measure your source for each hire.  These statistics will tell you and your management, which strategies are working well and help to drive budgets for investing deeper in certain strategies.

Should you need assistance developing a new approach or validating your existing one, please contact Tom Sheehan on our Advice & Resolution team at (919) 878-9222 or tom.sheehan@capital.org.