Posts Tagged ‘promotion’

How to Lose Your Best Employees in 10 Easy Steps

Tuesday, January 12th, 2016

Michelle Smith, VP of Marketing at O.C. Tanner

In anticipation of CAI’s upcoming HR Management Conference, one of this year’s speakers, Michelle Smith, shares the 10 toxic practices that will cause your business to lose its top talent.

Named one of the most influential women in the incentive industry, Michelle M. Smith, CPIM, CRP, is an accomplished international author and speaker, Past-President of the FORUM at Northwestern University, President Emeritus of the Incentive Marketing Association, Vice-President of Research for the Business Marketing Association, and Vice-President of Marketing for O.C. Tanner.

What could be more essential to both organizational success and the corporate bottom line than talent?

Most of us would agree that having the right talent is crucial for success and sustainability, yet many of the people in our employ continue to be marginalized and neglected, often taking a backseat to the various other matters that occupy our workdays as leaders.

And the problem seems to be pervasive.

While writing The Talent Mandate: Why Smart Companies Put People First, author Andrew Bennett spoke with a prominent business school professor who noted improvements and innovations in every area of business – except in talent management. In fact, the professor said no corporate function today lags behind as dramatically as how we manage the employees for which we are responsible.

That’s astonishing, and it’s also lunacy when the ‘War for Talent’ continues to rage and employee costs represent a majority of corporate expenses.

These things will cause your best people to leave

The author suggests we keep doing the following if we want to free ourselves from our brightest, most dynamic, and highest-potential employees:

1. Hire for the past, not the future. Choose talent based on what worked before, not on where the company is heading now. Emphasize candidates’ narrow former experience over a more generalized, nimble agility to adapt in a fast-changing world.

2. Downplay values and mission. Send the signal that anything goes in pursuit of profit, making employees guess about what choices are truly acceptable. Fail to spend time articulating to your workers why they come to work every day and how the greater community benefits from their efforts.

3. Bungle the teams. Avoid mixing generations and skill sets, instead grouping like with like and producing stale and predictable solutions that are safe and excite no one.

4. Put jerks into management.Reward the old-fashioned, autocratic style that stifles unorthodox, creative thinking and feels threatened by fresh ideas, energy and dynamism.

5. Measure hours, not results. Keep an expensive cadre of stern enforcers busy with policing everybody. Don’t trust your talent to use their time wisely. Crack down on social media. Forbid personal activities during the workday, even as you continue to expect work to be conducted long into the night and over the weekend.

6. Promote people straight up the ladder. Fail to give employees exposure to different parts of the business through lateral moves or cross-training, giving them the sensation of being narrowed over time, rather than being broadened and improved.

7. Leave talent management exclusively to HR. Expect the professionals who must deal with an increasingly complicated variety of personnel issues to also be exceptional visionaries in hiring. Detach the C-Suite and other leaders from talent recruitment and development since it’s not their department.

8. Hoard information. Keep decision-making securely ensconced in the executive wing. Avoid empowering mid-tier managers or employees lest they suddenly become entrepreneurial and unpredictable.

9. Don’t bother with training. It’s costly, and employees will probably jump ship with their new skills. Instead, have your workers do the same tasks over and over in the very same way.

10. Hire outsiders. After you’ve failed to train and develop your best people, follow it up by stifling their ambitions for increased responsibility. When they come to you and say, “I’m leaving,” express astonishment and outrage.

If these sound at all familiar, you’d better hope your competitors are following the same game plan or your organization could be in big trouble.

Either way, all is not lost. Please join me on March 10th at the HR Management Conference for “Winning the War for Talent in a People-Led Economy” to learn more about how to attract, develop and retain the best talent.

The presentation is full of tested research, insights, and tools for HR leaders to advance their organizations and their own careers. The session will help those looking to evolve professionally, or to be viewed more strategically by senior leadership, as these concepts can fundamentally change the future of leadership, recognition and engagement. I look forward to seeing you there!

 

Four Tips to Remember When Documenting

Tuesday, November 6th, 2012

Whether you’re about to give an employee performance review or investigate a harassment claim, how you document is important. Documenting employee actions provides necessary support for a number of workplace decisions: pay increase, termination, suspension, promotion, etc. Proper documentation helps you make better decisions for your company and your workforce. A good written account may also reduce your risk of legal liability.

Here are four things to not forget when putting things down on paper:

Use Specifics

All employer documents have the potential to be at the center of an employee complaint or lawsuit. Knowing this, it’s best to use as many specifics as possible—so that if a third-party reads the document, they know exactly what has happened. Include all parties involved, exactly when and where the event happened and how you intervened.

Be Immediate

Once you’ve given a performance review or dealt with a complaint, you should document the details while they’re still fresh in your head. You could lose crucial details even waiting just a few days after the incident occurred. Make the document work for you instead of against you.

Be Clear

Because your documents have the possibility of reaching a courtroom, being as clear as you can be will work in your favor. For example, if you have poor handwriting, type up your document. If you are unsure about an incident, don’t lie or embellish—say that you are unsure. Honesty and a good effort will help you.

Be Consistent

Treat all employees equally. If you are going to write someone up for blatantly disobeying a policy, you have to write up everyone who breaks that same rule. Same goes for a positive example—praise employees when they deserve it and mark it on their performance reviews. If you don’t follow this rule, you could get slapped with a discrimination suit, especially if your documents can’t clear your name.

For guidance on documenting specific circumstances, please call a member of CAI’s Advice and Counsel Team at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746.

Photo Source: Victor1558