Posts Tagged ‘positive people practices’

Making It A Great Day Every Day

Tuesday, November 22nd, 2016

What does it take to have a GREAT day?  Here are a few simple things you can do to begin your day, practice throughout your day and end your day to make each day a GREAT day:large_give-thanks-title2

Begin Each Day with Positive Thoughts

Start the day by reading or listening to an inspirational story or even a single thought.  Some desk calendars have a positive “thought of the day” which are very helpful.

Complement Work Goals with Life Goals

Almost always, work is tied to something personal in an employee’s life. It may be compensation or benefits, or it could be just personal satisfaction.  Work success affects life success and the reverse is also very true.

Mental Preparation

Most employees have a commute of some kind to work each day.  Instead of using that time to accomplish work-related tasks, use that time to prepare for the workday ahead.  Likewise, use the commute home to decompress so work does not interfere with personal time once you arrive.

Smile

A smile can be contagious.  If there is genuine happiness behind the smile, that is great.  If not, force a smile and spread some happiness anyway.  Spreading happiness contributes to being happy.

Be Positive

Keep a positive attitude around others.  Similar to a smile, a positive attitude will spread and affect the entire group.

Prioritize

Everyone has too much to do, so it is important to prioritize.  Twenty percent (20%) of all activity contributes to 80% of results.  So, hit that 20%  hard to maximize productivity and ensure a successful day.

Ignore Negativity

There is always someone around with a negative attitude who wants to get everyone else feeling negative as well.  Misery loves company!  Do not let them ruin a positive day or take away from significant accomplishments.  Avoid them and focus on the tasks at hand.

Avoid Long Workdays

Extra hours do not always equate to additional productivity. Chances are, most of the productivity will happen early in the day during the completion of those 20% of higher priority tasks. Adding more hours will not increase overall productivity.

Take Time to Relax

After work, take time to enjoy a relaxing activity and use that time to re-charge for the next day. Put the previous workday aside and leave it for tomorrow. This is part of the overall work-life balance.

End The Day With a Grateful Thought

Before turning in for a night’s rest, give some thought to events of the day for which to be grateful.  In other words, any day “could have been worse.”  Be grateful it was not worse, and attribute that to a positive attitude. Your grateful thought could be either professional or personal.

People like being appreciated. Simple efforts of recognition, particularly when made public to their managers and/or co-workers, encourage a supportive and productive working relationship.

Happy Thanksgiving from CAI and remember sometimes, the simplest gestures are the ones that mean the most.

Traits that Define Positive Leadership

Thursday, November 19th, 2015
George Ports, Senior Executive and HR Advisor

George Ports, Senior Executive and HR Advisor

“A true leader has the confidence to stand alone, the courage to make tough decisions, and the compassion to listen to the needs of others. He does not set out to be a leader, but becomes one by the equality of his actions and the integrity of his intent.” 

-General Douglas MacArthur

Can leaders demand  respect simply because of their position or title? The obvious answer to this question is NO.

Leaders earn respect leading by example, “Do as I do” rather than “Do as I say do”.  They earn respect by being up front and honest with their employees, treating them with “dignity and respect”.  Dignity and respect go both ways.

I have been in the Human Resources area for nearly 42 years.  Over the years , I have made  observations  of  actions and behaviors that in my opinion define “positive leadership”.    They are as follows:

  • Positive leaders are people builders, they are in the construction business, not the demolition business.
  • Positive leaders are fair and consistent when administering organization policies and procedures.
  • Positive leaders encourage an open two-way flow of communications.
  • Positive leaders do not leave their employees in the dark creating an atmosphere of anxiety and insecurity.
  • Positive leaders recognize the need for responding to employee issues/concerns in a prompt manner.
  • Positive leaders work in conjunction with Human Resources to ensure that internal pay equity is maintained among employees.
  • Positive leaders take up for their employees, stand behind and support them when necessary.
  • Positive leaders never take credit for employee accomplishments and ideas—they always give credit and praise where such is due.
  • Positive leaders work diligently to create an atmosphere of teamwork, a culture where every job and person is important, avoiding a “we/they” relationship.

Imitate these traits and you will find employees who work for you because they want to, not because they have to. If you want to learn more about how your business can cultivate these qualities within its employees, please give our Advice and Resolution Team a call at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746.

Study Finds Workplace Rudeness is Highly Contagious

Tuesday, October 27th, 2015

Sick woman at work drinking coffee

In today’s post, CAI’s Vice President of Membership Doug Blizzard shares the uncomfortable truth regarding the spread of negativity in the office. 

Peak flu season is still a few months away, but there’s another type of bug flying around the office that is just as contagious—and perhaps more harmful  – workplace rudeness.

Remember the old adage that if you give a smile chances are you’ll get one back?  Well, according to a new study published in the Journal of Applied Psychology, rudeness is just as contagious – and in it can be more harmful because it won’t just run its course and go away on its own. The damage it does is longer lasting, even permanent if you do not do something about it.

Researchers from the University of Florida did a study of behaviors among graduate business students about behaviors that came out as they practiced their negotiating skills with classmates.  Each student practiced with several other students over a period of weeks and then the students rated each others’ behaviors. A key finding was that those who judged their partners as rude were more likely to be judged as rude themselves. In other words, rudeness was contagious.

The study showed that rudeness activates a network of closely-related concepts in individuals’ minds. This activation influences individual’s hostile behaviors.  Another interesting finding of the study is that you don’t need to be the victim of a rude act to catch the bug. Employees who simply witness a rude act are likely to be rude to other employees.

“What we found in this study is that the contagious effect is based on an automatic cognitive mechanism — automatic means it happens somewhere in the subconscious part of your brain, so you don’t know its happening and can’t do much to stop it,” explained the study’s lead author, Trevor Foulk.  “Anything from simple insults to ignoring a co-worker, to purposely dis-including someone or withholding information,” can create the toxic environment, he added.  “It doesn’t just hurt your feelings,” says Mr. Foulk. “Experiencing or witnessing rudeness hurts your performance.”

A whopping 98% of workers say they have experienced workplace rudeness, with 50% percent of people experiencing these behaviors at least weekly, according to the study.  Any and all kinds of rudeness, from simple insults, to ignoring a co-worker, to purposely dis-including or withholding information from someone, can create the toxic environment.

Not only does rudeness negatively affect the workplace; it has also been linked to more stress at home.

Organizations’ cultures, like those of entire societies and nationalities, are the sum total of learned behaviors and the social and business values they reflect. People in the organization observe these behaviors in its key leaders and each other. Intuitively they associate the behaviors with success, they adopt them themselves and they pass them on to new members. It is an intuitive process that nurtures and sustains itself unless and until the key leaders change the key behaviors to new ones that reflect different values.  Rudeness is a behavior. As such it can be changed, and the toxic culture it creates will change along with it. But the leaders are the ones who have to start the process and sustain it.

Keep smiling and be respectful to one another. That is not just a happy-face platitude; it is a real-world strategy that helps build a winning culture and improve performance in organizations.  For more information about how you can build a more positive environment at your workplace, please call our Advice and Resolution team today at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746.

3 Tips for Achieving a High-Performing Workplace

Thursday, February 28th, 2013

Today’s post features CAI’s Director of Member Development, Doug Blizzard. In this video, Doug dives deep into the topic of positive people practices and how they have a substantial effect on company success. Doug points to a Cornell study that found that companies implementing effective people management strategies experienced 22.1 percent higher revenue growth, 23.3 percent higher profit growth and a 66.8 percent reduction in employee turnover.  

Sounds like this should be easy, right? Positive people practices, lead to engaged employees, leading to better business results. Doug says wrong. According to recent research, nearly two-thirds of US employees aren’t fully engaged at work. Doug lists the following reasons as to why some employees aren’t as engaged: asking your team to do more with less, passing business costs to employees and not giving proper management training.

Despite the less than thrilling numbers on engagement, some companies are able to achieve high-performing workplaces. Doug says they get there without above market compensation, better benefits, or flip flop Fridays. 

How do they do it? He gives three reasons:

Create a compelling vision for the company

Define why your company exists and communicate that clearly to your employees. Doug says a strong company vision is magnetic and motivating. The why is what compels people to want to work for you rather than just having to work for you.

Build a culture for the 95 percent

If your people practices are weak, you will not build a high-performing organization. He says that a company’s people systems can build, support or destroy a winning culture.  In the video, Doug asks you to take an honest look at your people policies.  Are they designed for the 95 percent of employees that want to do a good job or for the 5 percent that misbehave? Try designing for the 95 percent and you’ll likely see company morale, employee effort and performance improve.  Doug says the 5 percent will leave or you’ll help them leave. 

Practice positive management everyday

Doug says that front-line manages are the most critical link for almost everything your employees do.  Most people quit their supervisor, not the company. Research finds that poorly managed work groups are 50 percent less productive and 44 percent less profitable than well-managed groups.   Make sure your people managers are effective and watch performance improve, he says.

For additional guidance on achieving a high-performing workplace, please contact Doug Blizzard at 919-713-5244 or Doug.Blizzard@capital.org.