Posts Tagged ‘NC policies and benefits survey’

Create a Flexible Work Environment With These 6 Tips

Thursday, October 1st, 2015
Molly Hegeman, VP of HR Services

Molly Hegeman, VP of HR Services

In today’s post Molly Hegeman, CAI’s Vice President of  HR Services, shares helpful strategies for companies looking to offer more flexible scheduling to its employees.

When CAI first surveyed about flexible schedules in 2012, 48% of companies responded that they offered some form alternative work schedules.  In the 2014 NC Policies and Benefits Survey, that number had grown to 52%. In a recent discussion that I had with a group of HR professionals in Jacksonville, NC, this market trend got a lot of interest. Alternative work arrangements are definitely gaining popularity with employees, as evidenced by feedback in the Employee Opinion Surveys that CAI conducts.  All levels and types of employees are voicing a greater interest in flexibility with their hours, the work environment, etc.

With the convenience of mobile and wireless devices, many employees can work nearly 24/7. It seems only right that we should recognize the efforts of employees who check and respond to emails, complete a project after hours, etc. by giving them flexibility with their time.  So, what does that mean for employers?  More specifically, how do you make it work, especially in traditional organizations?

It used to be that companies would only allow a policy to exist if it affected all employees. I don’t think that’s practical anymore. Now don’t get me wrong, I believe all employees should be treated fairly. But fairly does not mean equal in all situations. For example, you may be able to offer a work from home schedule to an employee whose work is fairly independent and not contingent upon physically being in the office. That may not be practical, however, for the receptionist whose main job function is physically greeting customers/clients. It’s probably not reasonable for the organization to set up a virtual/Skype situation.  But, that employee could be afforded the option of a modified work shift and/or remote phone coverage (leaving only limited in person reception duties to be rearranged when needed).

So what’s an organization to do when it hasn’t previously offered flexible scheduling or remote work arrangements?

  1. Understand the options like flex time (schedule-based: compressed work week, flex hours, etc.) and flex location (location-based: telework, working remote).
  2. Consider why you would introduce flex work arrangements and what problem you are trying to solve (downsizing office space, employee morale, etc.).
  3. Ensure your management team supports schedule and/or location-based flex arrangements
  4. Define eligibility and the business situations that support the flex arrangements (even if you start in selected departments within your organization)
  5. Establish guidelines and procedures for your employees and managers to follow
  6. Continuously evaluate the flex arrangements and impact on employees, morale, productivity, business needs, etc.

In a world where there are competing interests and demands on all of us, why not consider the opportunity to help support your employees’ work-life effectiveness?  Whether you introduce small changes or a full program, the positive reaction and response from your employees (and managers) will be returned ten-fold. Flex work arrangements are a great strategy in attracting, retaining and motivating your workforce!

Want more information on our survey findings? Need help creating or updating your flexible schedule policy? Feel free to contact me, Molly Hegeman, directly at (919) 713-5263 or molly.hegeman@capital.org.

2014 NC Policies & Benefits Survey Reveals Total Rewards Practices of NC Employers

Tuesday, September 9th, 2014

survey dataDuring last month’s Compensation and Benefits Conference, Molly Hegeman, CAI’s Vice President of HR Services, shared information on what NC employers are doing in regard to their total rewards packages. Her presentation included statistics from the 2014 NC Policies & Benefits Survey. The only local survey of its kind shares employers’ answers to 320 questions related to workplace policies and employee benefits practices.

This year’s survey had participation from 384 employers located throughout North Carolina. Forty-four percent of participants are located in the Research Triangle region, 25 percent are in the Charlotte area and 17 percent are located in the Piedmont/Triad region with the remaining participants in the East/Southeast region.

Some key findings from the survey revolving around health and welfare benefits include:

  • Nearly all employers provide medical insurance to their employees. About 78 percent of employers offer a traditional PPO plan, about 27 percent offer a consumer driven HAS plan.
  • Regarding employer contribution to the insurance premium, on average, employers pay 80 percent of the premium for employee only PPO coverage and 55 percent of the premium for family PPO coverage for full-time employees.
  • About 71 percent of employers do not offer domestic partner benefits. In turn, about 18 percent of employers do offer domestic partner benefits regardless of sex of partner. About 11 percent offer benefits with sex restrictions.

The survey also covered time off and results revealed several things, such as:

  • About 72 percent of employers have a PTO policy. On average, employers provide 6 days of PTO upon hire, 13-14 days of PTO after 1 year of service, 15 days of PTO after three years of service, 17-18 days of PTO after 5 years of service and 20-21 days of PTO to employees after 10 years of service.
  • About 68 percent of employers have a formal sick plan that is separate from a PTO policy. On average, employers provide 9 sick days to full-time employees per year.
  • On average, employers provide 9 paid holidays to full-time employees and 5 paid holidays to part-time employees per year.
  • About 9 percent of employers offer a maternity leave policy separate from short-term disability or FMLA.

Pay practices is another subject the survey tackled. Participant responses include:

  • About 61 percent of employers indicated a pay philosophy of paying employees at or above market rate. In turn, 34 percent have no formal pay philosophy.
  • To determine compensation decisions, about 77 percent of employers use external market analyses, about 70 percent use internal job evaluations, about 58 percent use skill or competency-based methods, and 11 percent have no formal method.
  • The most common type of base pay increase employers give is performance based according to up to 83 percent of employers. About 22 percent give an across the board increase, about 17 percent give a cost of living increase, and about 6 percent give some other type of increase.

CAI provides this survey every two years. Other topic areas the survey covers include retirement plans, workplace culture, recruiting and staffing, termination and HR metrics.

The 2014 NC Policies & Benefits Survey can be purchased from CAI’s store here. If you’re interested in participating in next year’s survey, please contact a member of CAI’s survey team at cai-survey-team@capital.org.