Posts Tagged ‘manager tips’

Address These 4 Employee Needs for Maximum Retention

Tuesday, June 20th, 2017

Recruiting top employees involves a relevant understanding of what attracts candidates to an opportunity; what do they want, and what are their priorities.  Once you have them on board, how do you retain them?  The needs and priorities of an employee can be different than those of a candidate.

In addition to the usual priorities like compensation, benefits and a flexible work schedule, most employees have four (4) basic needs to be happy and engaged in the workplace.  Those four needs are:  Caring, Respect, Appreciation, and Praise.

CaringMost people can tell if you genuinely care about them or not.  Something in your voice, the way you address them, or even your body language can tip them off.  Sincerity is difficult to fake and insincerity is difficult to hide.  Employees need to know their management cares about them for more than just what they bring to the business each day.  Be sure they know your door is always open.  Make certain you are responsive by setting aside sufficient time to understand their concern and to try and help address it.  Remember, for them, coming to you is a big step.  If you seem at all as if you do not care, or that you do not have time for them, they may not come to you again.

Respect – Everyone wants respect.  Respect for what they do and respect for how they do it.  One of the quickest ways to demonstrate a lack of respect for your employee is to micromanage.  Micromanaging suggests a lack of trust in your employee’s ability to get the job done.  On the other hand, one of the best ways to demonstrate respect for your employee is to allow them to grow to their full potential.  Offer your leadership and mentoring to help them succeed.  Provide training for employees who demonstrate initiative and show true promise for advancement.

Appreciation – Showing your appreciation for an employee’s results and work ethic is not difficult, and it does not have to be expensive.  We sometimes focus far too much and far too often on the negative, and not enough on the positive.  A simple “Thank You” can go a long way.  A pair of movie coupons or recognition in front of peers is a great way to show your appreciation.  Without appreciation, an employee may feel beaten and defeated.  They will eventually come to believe they can do nothing right, and will not want to come to work.

Praise – This is really just “appreciation” kicked up a notch or two.  It is always nice to feel appreciated, but to receive praise is an entirely different feeling.  Praise is larger, and therefore should be reserved for recognition of an employee going above and beyond their everyday job function.  An innovative idea, a new time-saving process, or productivity metrics well over 100% are just a few reasons to award special praise over simple appreciation.  Praise for employee who exceeds their expectations can also serve to incent other team members to “step up their game” in order to receive similar recognition.

This all sounds very simple, but in fact it takes time and thought.  These are very deliberate actions on the part of leaders, and time must be built into the day to accomplish even two or three of these for at least one or two individuals.  Over time, Caring, Respect, Appreciation and Praise will begin to filter across the workforce and you will have employees who not only trust you, but are loyal to you and your organization as well. Employees will feed off of the positive culture and demonstrate care, respect, appreciation and praise for co-workers.

CAI’s Advice & Resolution Advisor Renee Watkins is a seasoned HR professional with a diverse background in Human Resource. Renee provides CAI members with practical advice in a wide range of human resource functions including conflict resolution, compliance and regulatory issues, and employee relations.

How HR Can Help Managers Conduct Effective Meetings

Tuesday, April 11th, 2017

Today’s managers and their employees are busy. There’s never enough time in the day to ‘get it all done.’ As an HR manager or someone who is acting in an HR role, you can help your managers maximize their time and accomplish their objectives. Meetings that begin without a plan go astray quickly and become big time wasters. CAI’s Tom Sheehan shares his tips below to help your managers understand the keys to successful and effective meetings.

Here’s the thing about meetings. They all start off with good intentions. Someone calls a meeting to communicate an important update or new initiative. The next thing you know, you’ve wasted an hour of your time sitting through what appears to be a ‘stream of consciousness’ discussion with no real outcomes. While the exchanges may have therapeutic value, little else is gained.

Follow these four simple rules to improve meeting effectiveness:

1. Don’t hold a meeting without a documented agenda

Without an agenda, you have laid the groundwork for a rambling ‘free for all.’  How will you know if your meeting is getting off track if you never bothered to define the track?

2. Discuss progress vs. goals

During tactical staff meetings, make certain that the start of each meeting is dedicated to a review of how the team is progressing relative to its goals. You may also want to give a quick update on how the company is performing toward its goals.

3. Tactical and strategic discussions should be addressed in separate meetings

Oftentimes, these topics have mutually exclusive participants. By mixing the two together you can ‘cloud’ the discussion. For example, do you really want administrative staff involved in discussions that relate to establishing strategy?  Conversely, does an executive leader need to be involved in lower-level procedural tactics?

4.  Meetings must end with clear-cut and specific agreements around decisions and actions to be taken

The worst thing that can happen is to walk out of a meeting without confirmation about what has been decided. The reality is that each of us will interpret what was discussed through our own lens. As a result, without confirmation, we will apply our own set of rules to the outcome. A typical response at a subsequent meeting might sound like this…”well we talked about that change, but I don’t think anything was actually finalized.”

CAI delivers HR, compliance, and people development solutions to 1,100+ NC companies to help them build engaged, well-managed and low-risk workplaces. Contact us to find out how we can help your company.


Tom Sheehan brings 20+ years of extensive, broad-based strategic, tactical and practical HR experience to CAI’s 
Advice & Resolution team.  He advises HR and other business leaders on talent management, organizational effectiveness, employee engagement, M&A’s, and employee relations.