Posts Tagged ‘management training’

Employee Engagement Starts and Ends with the Boss

Thursday, February 27th, 2014

In today’s video blog, CAI’s Vice President of Membership, Doug Blizzard, discusses employee engagement. Why aren’t my employees engaged?—is a question he often receives from CAI members. He says that many studies on the topic show that 60 to 70 percent of employees are not engaged with their organization. High numbers of disengaged employees mean companies are losing productivity.

Engaged teams are more profitable and more productive than teams that are not. Doug also notes that companies with disengaged teams face several challenges, such as higher turnover, increased absenteeism and more safety incidents.

Doug says the first step in getting your team engaged is realizing that engagement isn’t happiness or satisfaction. Engagement is really talking about the emotional commitment an employee has to his organization and its goals.

According to different studies, 70 percent of engagement is determined by an employee’s primary manager or boss. Doug explains that failure of the boss to execute good management has by far the biggest impact on engagement.  He says that everything employers do for their business will be interpreted by, reinforced,  ignored and even torn down by your supervisors and managers.

Doug says the message is clear: if you really want to engage your employees, start by developing your supervisors and managers.  If you’d like additional guidance on increasing employee engagement, please call a member of CAI’s Advice and Resolution Team at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746.

Improve Employee Efficiency by Updating Your Workplace Practices

Thursday, August 1st, 2013

August Quote blog

Albert Einstein once said, “If the facts don’t fit the theory, change the facts.” Is this quote applicable to your workplace? Is your organization meeting its business goals? Are you making all of your deadlines? Are your employees engaged and is their productivity high? If you can’t answer yes to all of these questions, you may need to reconsider some of your workplace practices.

A positive company culture and a helpful set of workplace guidelines will help you reach your business goals. They will also help you create more positive relationships with your employees, which will raise their job satisfaction and morale. There are a number of steps your organization can take to incorporate constructive employer practices. Check out a few examples below:

Give constant feedback

No matter their age or tenure at your company, your employees want to know how their work performance measures up. Regularly informing your employees about their work performance is beneficial for your organization because you’ll learn more about your employees and the workload they can or can’t handle. For five ways to offer feedback to your employees, please visit here: http://blog.capital.org/employees-will-seek-consistent-feedback-in-the-new-year/.

Be clear and transparent with communication

An organization that has issues with clearly communicating to their workforce will have a hard time reaching success. By practicing transparency and good communications, you’ll gain trust from your employees. They’ll likely be motivated to be more productive as well. Find out the most common causes of workplace miscommunication here: http://blog.capital.org/five-common-causes-of-miscommunication-in-the-workplace-and-how-to-avoid-them/ and find solutions that will help you communicate effectively here: http://blog.capital.org/are-you-communicating-effectively/.

Invest in training for your managers

Researchers have found that many times the reason why employees leave or aren’t as productive is because the people leading them aren’t doing a good job. Managers and supervisors have several items on their plate, but one of their most important items is developing and overseeing their direct reports. Before you promote your next manager, make sure you offer them proper training. Here are some ideas: http://blog.capital.org/ongoing-training-helps-managers-reach-success/.

For additional help on increasing workplace productivity and meeting your company goals, please call a member of CAI’s Advice and Counsel Team at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746.

Keep Your Employees off the Playground: Preventing and Dealing with Workplace Bullying

Tuesday, October 4th, 2011

Today’s news headlines are filled with stories of childhood and teenage bullying with dire consequences, but name calling, intimidation and similar behaviors do not always end in high school.   CAI’s CEO Bruce Clarke recently addressed the topic of workplace bullying in his News & Observer column, The View from HR. In his October 2 edition, he informed readers that 50 to 75 percent of employees have witnessed or experienced workplace bullying.

A company bully can be an associate, a manager or even the chief executive of the entire organization. Workplace bullies can utilize tactics that can be detrimental to a coworker’s health and career. Giving the silent treatment, humiliating others in public and attacking a person’s character or beliefs are shenanigans from a typical bully. Terrors in the office can hold even more power over their victims’ heads by refusing to give coworkers information, implementing impossible deadlines, ignoring achievements and repetitively mentioning mistakes.

Victims of bullies can suffer physically and mentally. Many studies have shown that workers who are frequently bullied report to be more stressed, prone to stomach aches and ulcers, and unhappy and unsatisfied at their jobs. Not only does the victim suffer, but the employee’s organization will also experience negative residual effects. Workplaces that ignore company bullies can lose respect and credibility from their employees. Company morale could lower and absenteeism could rise. Employees who are bullied may struggle to focus on their work, which can decrease productivity. Some staff members might look for new jobs to escape from their bullies, causing turn over to increase.

 As an HR professional, you must do your part to create a bully-free work environment. Here are some tips to help you form a peaceful and productive workplace:bully

  • Never ignore a complaint about bullying. Respect your employees and let them know that you trust and believe the information that they give you. Many times victims are embarrassed or scared to report incidents of bullying. Let your employees know that you care about them and will listen to their grievances. Assure them that you will help them resolve their problems as soon as possible.
  • Create an environment of open communication. Make it okay for employees to feel comfortable talking to their managers about how they are feeling at work. Encourage team members to share factors that make them feel stressed and help them devise a plan to work through tough times.
  • Educate employees on workplace bullies and the effects they can have on their coworkers and their organization.  Providing training on bullying to all staff members, including senior leadership, can help reduce the chances for a company bully to thrive. Advocate that employees report any occurrences of malevolent workplace behavior.
  • Draft a policy that prevents bullying and make it available to all staff members. This policy should include language on how to make a proper complaint, how managers should react and how issues will be handled. Enforce a strategy for dealing with bullies and assign appropriate punishment for misconduct. Counseling for bullies is also suggested, so they understand the errors in their behavior and can work to improve their work performance and keep their jobs.

Additionally, if a bully threatens his victim with violence, waste no time to get to the bottom of the issue. Depending on the severity of the threat, calling the police to report outrageous behavior can be effective. For more information on how to handle bullies, please contact a member of CAI’s Advice & Counsel at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746.

Photo Source: Eddie~S