Posts Tagged ‘I-9s’

9 Things You Should Know About Immigration Law and I-9’s

Tuesday, April 15th, 2014

I9 paperworkImmigration law can often be a tricky subject for employers to tackle. To ensure you’re keeping your organization compliant, here is some helpful information to remember:

1. Employers who have constructive knowledge that an employee is not authorized to work, but continue to allow the employee to work are subject to fines.

2. Although employers are not required to do I-9’s for contractors, they have a duty to ensure to the best of their ability that contractors are legally authorized to work in the United States.

3. Employers who hire out-of-state employees where there is no company representative to handle the I-9 process may contract with someone to complete I-9’s on their behalf, such as a notary public. (Note: Texas does not allow notaries to perform this service.)

4. Employers cannot require an employee to present documentation to support the Section 1 information. The employee attests by signature that this information is correct.

5. Employers or their agents are not required to notify the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) of illegal aliens discovered through the I-9 process, and it is not recommended that you do so.

6. The I-9 form cannot be completed until a job offer is made and accepted. Because the I-9 requires date of birth and identifies whether the person is a U.S. citizen or alien, it could be a source of potential discrimination charges if an applicant were required to complete it pre-offer and then not be hired.

7. The I-9 Form states that Section 1 should be completed and signed by the employee on the day employment begins. This is defined as the first day of work where the employee is providing labor or services in exchange for pay.

8. It is fraud if someone other than the employee fills in Section 1 but does not provide the required information and a signature in the Preparer and/or Translator Certification box, or if HR or a company representative fills in missing information in Section 1 for the employee.

9. ICE investigations are lead-driven. Leads that appear to have some merit must be further investigated to avoid constructive knowledge and to resolve the issue.

Ogletree Deakins’ attorney Bernhard Mueller will provide additional information and updates regarding immigration law at the 2014 Employment and Labor Law Update. The conference will take place at the McKimmon Center in Raleigh on May 14 and May 15. In addition to immigration law, presenters will cover wage and hour issues, NC legislature, ADA, minimizing lawsuits, protecting proprietary information, and more. Register today at www.capital.org/lawupdate.

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Don’t Make These 4 Common Mistakes When Filling Out an I-9

Tuesday, March 27th, 2012

The I-9 form can be a tricky document for employers. The government has created specific rules that must be followed when completing the deceivingly simple document. Your organization may be penalized and fined if the regulating agency discovers incorrect information or mistakes in your employees’ I-9 forms. To stay compliant with state and federal regulations, avoid these common I-9 mistakes:

1.  Does Everyone Have an I-9 Form on File?

Your organization should have a correctly completed I-9 form for every employee. Making sure that you do is important to stay in compliance. If the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agency conducts an audit or investigation and learns that you’re missing forms for any of your employees, you will most likely be fined.

2.  Missing and Misplaced Information

Missing and misplaced information are mistakes that can easily be avoided if you and your employees spend adequate time filling out the documents and reviewing for errors. Here are some examples of information that is frequently misplaced or left out: wrong date, no signatures and information in incorrect boxes.

3.  Not Following the Three-Day Rule

You are required to complete a new hire’s I-9 form within three days of his first day of paid work. After an applicant has been offered and has accepted the job, ensure the new employee is aware of the types of acceptable identifying documents they may choose to provide to accurately fill out their I-9 forms. Helping your employees prepare for their first day of work will help you steer clear of potential fines.

4.  Incorrect Corrections

If there is incorrect information on an I-9 form, do not use a marker to cross out the information. Using white out is another mistake that employers often make when trying to correct information. Failing to initial and date corrections will also make an employee’s I-9 form erroneous. If these mistakes are made and the document lacks clarity or is not easy to follow, filling out a new form is appropriate. Make sure the original document is attached to the new one. Never backdate changes.

For more information on staying compliant with state and federal regulations, please join us on May 2nd and 3rd at the McKimmon Center in Raleigh for the 2012 Employment and Labor Law Update. The conference will feature experienced lawyers from Ogletree Deakins who will update you on the most recent regulatory and legal changes affecting employers. Some of the topics they’ll discuss include the ADAAA, Workers’ Compensation and Healthcare Reform. You can register for the event and see the additional topics here: www.capital.org/lawupdate.

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