Posts Tagged ‘Human Resources’

Here’s How to Master Doing Less Better…

Thursday, January 21st, 2016
Tom Sheehan, HR Business Partner

Tom Sheehan, HR Business Partner

In today’s post, CAI’s HR Business Partner Tom Sheehan shares the importance of HR professionals staying focused on one or two projects at a time rather than spreading themselves too thin.

Because of its inherent support role, the HR function and its leaders typically have a strong service orientation. That means that as ‘opportunities’ to support and serve the business are brought forward, there is a certain eagerness to please the customer. HR professionals frequently struggle to identify and prioritize which HR projects to push forward to the organization.

Because of the desire to please, HR teams typically conduct too many initiatives, often with mediocre results. Conducting too many projects dilutes the effectiveness of each initiative, and wastes valuable resources.

When deciding which HR initiatives are top priorities, answer these three questions:

  1. To what extent does this HR initiative further the key business objectives that have been laid out for the organization?
  2. If we decide to move forward with this project, what project or initiative must be bumped or moved down the priorities list?
  3. Can we articulate a true return on investment on this project?

Here are the most typical projects that the HR team may undertake:

  1. Improving leadership development
  2. Implementing new technology
  3. Restructuring the organization
  4. Delivering on recruiting initiatives
  5. Measuring and improving workforce performance
  6. Enhancing employee engagement

At the end of the day, HR professionals and their teams would benefit greatly by ‘doing less better.’  That may mean selecting one or two projects to focus on and delivering outstanding results on each of them. Do not move on to the next project until the current project is fully executed and has had a chance to take hold. Being able to stand your ground and appropriately push back when being pressured to take on a new initiative is often a key success factor.

Nothing will ‘short-circuit’ your credibility more quickly than a series of half-delivered projects with mediocre results. The ‘customer-requested’ projects should of course be added to the master list of projects and prioritized appropriately. The master list should include dates and timelines as well, and undergo periodic review with the leadership team.

Frequently, HR leaders are challenged by the business with a ‘critical’ training opportunity for the problem du jour. The expectation by the customer is that HR drop everything and hastily complete the training project. This ‘drop everything’ approach to training is frequently misguided and should also be weighed against existing priorities and projects. It is critical to remember that there is an opportunity cost associated with every project. Never allow a new ‘discretionary’ project to come at the expense of delivering on the strategic promise.

If you think you may need help rethinking your department’s priorities, please give our Advice & Resolution team a ring at at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746.

Don’t Let Behavioral Issues Hamper Strong Performance

Tuesday, January 5th, 2016
Bruce Clarke, President and CEO

Bruce Clarke, President and CEO

The following post is by Bruce Clarke, CAI’s CEO and President. The article originally appeared in Bruce’s News and Observer column, The View from HR.

Employees succeed with the right combination of aptitude and attitude. Technical skills are insufficient if poor behaviors dominate. Great behaviors cannot overcome basic technical failures.

Most managers are effective when discussing a hard-skills gap with employees. “Liz, when you seal a sterile container, make sure this checklist is followed, including a label with the seal date.” Easy. The discussion is all business, not personal. The skills can be trained. There is often a right way and a wrong way.

Behavior and attitude issues are different. Employees (and managers) bring their own versions to work. Our genetics and years of living formed patterns. No training class or checklist can cure behavioral problems quickly. There are fewer rights and wrongs. It seems too personal.

Because it is hard, many managers avoid conversations about behaviors until something blows up. “You make me crazy when you act like that!” “You are hard to work with, everybody says so!” “You’re fired!”

When we train managers in communications skills, tools and acronyms help them transfer new knowledge to the workplace. One of my favorites is B.I.T. Instead of getting angry and ranting, have a “Behavior-Impact-Tomorrow fit” the next time behavioral problems cause work problems.

Behavior

Focus on the observable behavior, not your guess at intent. For example, if you tell an employee “you are rude to team members during our project reviews and shut them down,” you are assuming the intent to shut people down. The employee will become defensive and never agree they meant to be rude or to stifle debate.

Instead, describe the observable behavior: “Several times during our last team meeting, you interrupted before the other person finished their thought. This has happened in other meetings as well.”

Impact

Next, describe the impact of this behavior. “When you interrupt someone who is trying to explain their idea, several things happen. It can prevent us all from learning something valuable. It can chill others from challenging your ideas. It also hurts your ability to receive a fair shot for your own ideas. For example, I saw Mary back off her idea yesterday when you interrupted before she finished a sentence.

Tomorrow

“Tomorrow, I expect you to listen well to teammates and work hard to understand what they are saying. Ask them questions to understand their ideas. Hear them out before you ask them to hear you. Tomorrow, spend time listening to the speaker to understand, rather than inserting your response. Sit on your hands if you need that reminder. It will benefit you and the team.”

“Stop interrupting people!” is better than ignoring the problem, but providing a tool or technique to improve behavior works better. Describing the future state and giving more feedback after the next meeting make your expectations concrete.

Getting the very best from every employee is a manager’s main purpose. Motivation, rewards, clarity, engagement and recognition all play a part. Coaching and corrective discussions can be just as important, especially when behavioral problems prevent excellent performance.

If you have any further suggestions as to how managers can improve behavior and attitude issues, please let us know in the comments! For questions, please contact our Advice & Resolution team at at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746 if you encounter any further challenges with the growth of your small business.

Top 5 Reasons You Need HR Technology

Tuesday, December 22nd, 2015

The post below is a guest blog from Rachel Richards who serves as Enrollment Services and Voluntary Benefits Solutions Team Lead for CAI’s employee benefits partner Hill, Chesson & Woody.

Until recently, HR Technology was reserved for employers with more than 100 employees and true Human Capital Management was for +1,000 employers.  The landscape of HR technology is swiftly changing, especially with the implementation of the Affordable Care Act.

Having benefits, payroll, and time keeping is more important now than ever, and easily accessible for employers all the way down to 50 employees.  New HR technology companies are popping up on a weekly, sometimes daily, basis.

See the top 5 reasons to have HR technology:

1. ACA Tracking & Reporting

Companies with over 50 full time equivalent employees (FTE) will need to be able track variable hour employees to determine eligibility.  Employers will also need to illustrate whether benefit eligible employees were offered employer-sponsored health care coverage and whether that coverage meets minimum essential coverage (MEC) standards.  Employers will need to capture this information and report on the IRS Forms 1094 and 1095.  In addition, specific enrollment information is required on the 1095-C form which can be handled easily by a benefit administration system.

2. Streamline Processes Through Integration

Whether you put in a “single source solution” where the same HR technology vendor provides you with payroll, benefits, and other HR technology modules or you find the best in class for each type of technology, information should flow from one area to another seamlessly.  This can be done through integration – integration with payroll, integration with your benefit carriers, and integration with your time keeping system.  It’s important to have one core system of record that is feeding all other systems, typically this is either payroll or core HR.

3. Electronic Onboarding

Removing paper from the onboarding process will bring efficiency to your entire HR department.  Imagine once an offer of employment is accepted, a link with your entire onboarding process is delivered to the new employee before they even start their first day of work. This feature is available in MOST benefit administration systems, however, the way these systems capture and store this information can vary greatly.  Be sure to ask questions, request demonstrations, and have a solid understanding of the onboarding capabilities before executing any agreements.

4. Simplify Administration

Whether you have 3 or 1,000 employees, a benefit administration along with other HR technology modules will eliminate paperwork and multiple points of entry.  In addition, having the ability to run reports to gather and share information about your workforce allows HR to provide information to the executive level team easily.

5. Notifications and Electronic Disclosures

There are many notices required under ERISA, ACA, and other regulatory agencies.  As an employer, you are required to notify your employees and keep a confirmation on hand with a time and date stamp of the notification.  A benefit administration system can allow you to notify your employees electronically and can even capture and store acknowledgements of receipt.

For more information on how HR Technology can streamline your benefit administration, contact HCW’s Enrollment Services and Voluntary Benefit Solutions team.

Creating a Successful Mentorship Program

Thursday, June 30th, 2011

Mentoring is a tool to grow employees and accelerate their career development. Companies that offer mentorship programs enjoy many benefits, including retaining top talent, increasing company loyalty and keeping employees engaged. Overall company productivity is also improved when mentorship programs exist.

Employees who are mentored gain critical company knowledge, learn new skills and receive feedback on their career growth and goals, which help them to succeed in their positions. Senior staff members who mentor prosper from the experience, too. Researchers found that their work productivity increases, they have less stress and they feel revitalized in their careers.

Benefits are achieved only if the mentorship program has a strong structure and committed participants, so follow these guidelines to create a successful initiative:

Define the Goal and Structure

To make sure the mentorship program flourishes, it is important to have a strong program goal. Whether it is to help new hires acclimate faster or to cultivate potential manager candidates, one focus will help the program triumph.

Establish an end date as well. More people will participate if there is a specific time frame, and an end date gives a new set of employees an opportunity to experience the process.

Facilitating and Participation

A good mentorship program has a designated facilitator, often called the Mentoring Program Manager (MPM). The MPM creates the mentoring program and works to align the initiative with company goals. The point person sets clear expectations for both the mentors and mentees, which include the time commitment and level of engagement needed from all participants.

Ensuring all staff members are involved in some way or are aware of the program will help the initiative obtain good results. High-level executives should partake in the process—either to offer suggestions to the program facilitator or to serve as mentors themselves. Their participation will help others see the program’s value.

Mentees, Mentors and Managers

Specify criteria for those being mentored. Mentee candidates will help define the qualities needed for mentors. In addition to having excellent communications skills and a strong ability to relate with others, experts suggest that mentors should be at least two levels above the mentee. This requirement guarantees that they can offer great company information while understanding their mentees’ roles. This format eliminates competition for jobs or promotions as well.

Managers provide information similar to what mentors offer, but they have different objectives and job requirements when working with their employees. Managers want employees to grow and perform to help company productivity, and unlike mentors, managers can assign projects, conduct performance reviews and recommend raises or promotions.

Companies should avoid staff members mentoring people they directly manage because they act as key decision makers for their employees. Mentees might feel as though they cannot freely talk about their frustrations and weaknesses with their managers. Mentors who are not managers provide employees with a safe environment to discuss various topics.

Follow Up, Evaluation and Results

Facilitators should make a great effort in following up with participants throughout the process. Encouraging open communication and constant feedback will help the MPM get a gauge on the program’s progress.

Because it might take months to years to see direct results, patience is required when launching a mentorship program. Making sure you get feedback from participants is important when measuring its effectiveness. Surveys and interviews help evaluate success, and final results received will help your company determine if the program was a good investment and if there are improvements needed for a future initiative.

For more information or tips on successful mentorship programs, please contact a member of CAI’s Advice and Counsel Team at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746.

Two Key Considerations When Performing Background Checks

Thursday, June 16th, 2011

When people fib about their work history, educational degree, job titles or salaries, criminal background and substance abuse habits – the top five lies told by job candidates – the results can be devastating for a company to have these individuals on staff. Performing a strong background check to weed out violent and dishonest candidates is essential if a firm is to work at top efficiency. In fact, one study estimates that the resultant annual ROI for using background screening to prevent business losses is more than 900 percent.

Potential employees can omit details that hide facts that can be difficult to uncover. To make sure your background checks are as thorough as possible, consider the following suggestions:

Hire a professional background checking company, also known as a consumer reporting agency – A CRA can help a business conduct background checks on candidates so that it does not have to devote extra time and resources for this process, plus it helps reduce liability. If you use a CRA, you must follow the federal law and tell the candidate on a document separate from the employment application that you are going to conduct a background check to independently verify the information provided, and the individual must first sign a document authorizing the background check. Turning someone down based on information drawn from a CRA requires that you give the applicant a chance to review the negative information, and possibly dispute the record before you make your final hiring decision. To know what you can and cannot do with a CRA report, review the federal Fair Credit Reporting Act requirements.

Perform searches appropriate for the position – Hiring a CRA is only part of the battle. You must make sure that you are asking for the appropriate research.  You should start with some sort of name and address history search to independently verify the applicant’s basic information.  Then you should search for criminal records based upon the address history for some given “time window” – maybe 7 years.  Other types of searches should be based upon job responsibilities. Check on licensing claims, driving records, education verification, professional  and employment references, Medicaid sanctions, and other registries where needed to ensure that the applicant meets the minimum requirements for the job. Early discoveries can prevent much bigger later headaches if the person is lying.

For additional information on what to consider for background checks, please call Kevin von der Lippe at (919) 878-9222 or (336) 668-7746.

Photo source: showbizsuperstar

2011 Ovation Award Spotlight: Rex Healthcare

Tuesday, June 14th, 2011

Winner of numerous accolades, including best hospital and best place to work, Rex Healthcare constantly aims to please its clients, patients and employees. Rex has always invested a significant amount of time and effort in long-term facility, service line and operational planning to keep its position as one of the leading health care providers in North Carolina and the country. To stay competitive in the health care industry, the hospital focused its attention on workforce planning.  Rex’s initiative to forecast and identify talent needs to support its long-term strategic goals earned the hospital the 2011 Ovation Award in the large employer category (companies with more than 500 employees).

Several years ago, strategic workforce decisions were made based on instinct instead of data. This approach led to faulty assumptions with little or no consideration for long-term implications of talent decisions. Realizing that proactive workforce planning would be critical in implementing strategies to support the community’s growing health care needs, Rex’s leadership and HR team developed an improvement plan.

The improvement plan included the following components:

  1. The senior leadership team conducted a SWOT analysis and used scenario planning to forecast worst case, best case, and no change scenarios.  The talent implications of each scenario were identified.
  2. The HR team engaged mid-level leaders in assessing Rex’s current labor pool and anticipating talent needs based on their future business plans.
  3. Leaders segmented positions as strategic, key, support and transitional to help better define important focus areas for future workforce planning.
  4. Workforce planning was piloted in one business unit before rolling out to the whole organization to make sure the program was solid.
  5. Special attention was placed on making sure that Rex’s HR team was fully prepared for the impact that the new initiative would have on HR processes, such as compensation, recruiting top talent and managing performance.
  6. The HR team was trained in the workforce planning process, how to hold strategic business conversations with business leaders, workforce data analysis and coaching of business leaders to use data to create a workforce plan.

After two years, one of the key outputs of the process—data integration and mapping into a new workforce planning tool—is nearly complete.   Rex expects to gain many new insights into its workforce once the hospital begins to analyze the data.

Many positive outcomes have resulted from the improvement program already.  Scenario planning revealed talent gaps and assisted in creating three high-priority workforce planning strategies that resulted in innovative solutions for developing and retaining employees in key and strategic roles.

In addition to helping the hospital win CAI’s 2011 Ovation Award, Rex’s initiative helped the hospital identify positions and processes to establish a competitive advantage in the industry. For more information on implementing a workforce planning initiative at your organization, please contact Theresa Brett, Director of Strategic Talent Management, at Theresa.brett@rexhealth.com.

CAI recognizes North Carolina companies for innovative HR/People solutions with Ovation Awards during its annual HR Management Conference in February.  If you’d like to be considered please send a 2-3 paragraph description of your program to doug.blizzard@capital.org.  The description should summarize the business need, describe how the solution was implemented, and highlight the measurable and/or forecasted business results.

Use Professional Development to Motivate and Retain Top Talent

Thursday, June 9th, 2011

Many organizations believe that increasing salary is the most effective way to retain their stellar performers. Although higher salaries might keep employees at their jobs, it is not a cost-effective solution for employers. To help staff members remain content without maxing out budgets, companies can devote time to staff development and education.

Employees stay in their positions when they believe they are accomplishing their goals and advancing in their careers. Showing serious interest in the development of your staff demonstrates to employees that they are essential in achieving success for the company. Support within management to invest in workforce coaching will help your organization attain a lower turnover rate and strengthen employee morale.

The entire organization benefits when time and resources are allotted to professional growth and job preparation. Employees are satisfied and become more productive, which leads to increased efficiency and greater revenue. Here are a few tips to promote the growth of your team members:

  1. Help staff set goals. Have employees evaluate their responsibilities to determine their strengths and weaknesses prior to setting goals. Help them establish obtainable goals that align with their interests and strengths to support success. Goals should be measurable, and a timeline can track progress.  Personally praise employees when goals are achieved.
  2. Inform employees on training opportunities. Alert staff of different training and educational opportunities that benefit their position, and encourage them to participate. Offer to sponsor their attendance for different activities, such as conferences and seminars. If sponsoring is too expensive, partial payment still exhibits your vested interest in their career.
  3. Encourage membership in professional groups and associations. Organizations relevant to employees’ positions allow them to network with similar professionals, learn best practices and even gain new clients. To help facilitate their involvement, consider providing them annual stipends to partake in group activities related to their fields or reimbursing membership dues and other fees. Provide flexibility in scheduling and options to work nontraditional hours to allow employees to attend events as well.
  4. Recognize training progress. Employees need positive reinforcement when they continually perform their duties well. By attending training sessions, they invest in their career development as well as benefit the organization, so it is important to acknowledge their efforts. Take time to discuss what they learned from their experiences, and advocate that they integrate new knowledge into their responsibilities. Congratulating team members on earning certifications also promotes company loyalty.

Members of management should consider training options for themselves as well in order to set positive examples for all employees. Company leaders should also explain the value of continual education and professional development during staff gatherings or one-on-one meetings.

For more information on staff development and professional training, please contact a member of CAI’s Advice and Counsel Team at (919) 878-9222 or (336) 668-7746, or ask for an account manager to discover the different training options CAI offers.

Photo source: lumaxart

Informative, Engaging and Entertaining: CAI’s 2011 Employment and Labor Law Update Conference

Monday, June 6th, 2011

Three hundred and seventy-two executives and HR professionals traveled to the McKimmon Center in Raleigh on May 17 and May 18 to attend CAI’s 2011 Employment and Labor Law Update Conference. CAI’s annual two-day event is designed to inform employers on the challenging and ever-changing legislative and regulatory environment companies are up against.

During the conference, lawyers from Ogletree Deakins and CAI staff members updated conference attendees on pertinent information ranging from a variety of topics, including health reform, NLRB changes and tips for creating effective company documents.

First-time conference goers, like Joan Inman, human resources director of SouthData, explored the 2011 conference to get professional expertise and vital information related to employers’ issues.

“I’m just seeking knowledge, and I want well-informed people telling me what I need to know,” Joan said on why she attended.

Each year CAI works with Ogletree Deakins to develop educational and engaging program sessions for the attendees. Those participating at the conference also receive notebooks packed with PowerPoint slides, white papers and several case studies that all further explain recent legal changes. Not only are the legal and regulatory updates a huge draw for conference attendees, but HR professionals like Yolanda Dejesus, director of human resources for the Office of Strategy and HR at AICPA, said the conference is “well worth the value” because of the information provided and the opportunity to network with others, including attorneys and company leaders from the Triangle, Triad and Eastern North Carolina.

“[CAI] always has great training and conferences. I always learn something new,” said Erika Koteff, HR manager at District Distributors when asked about the updates supplied at the conference.

Participants also have the opportunity to receive legal counsel on their own employment issues during the conference’s panel discussion. Featuring lawyers and HR specialists, the panel gives expert solutions to questions raised by audience members. Popular topics addressed during this year’s session included questions about FMLA guidelines and staying compliant with government instructions regarding I-9s.

Entertaining the audience members was a must at this year’s conference as well, and during the lively Wild and Wacky Cases session, guests learned about unbelievable cases that occurred in 2010. This year, the popular session highlighted information on crazy bathroom break policies, jaw-dropping workplace fraternizing and outlandish professional dress. Another fun and highly interactive part of the conference was the trivia game. Once the final informative session ended, Matt Keen of Ogletree Deakins asked participants to test their knowledge on the information presented at the conference by using electronic devices to answer the game’s yes or no questions.

The 2011 conference evaluations revealed that attendees found this year’s topics relevant and applicable to the many issues they are facing in their HR departments. CAI members, such as the Director of HR at Haven House Jennifer Boyler, return to the conference every year to stay up to date on news affecting employers.

“It’s a can’t-be-missed conference,” she said when describing the valuable event.

Please see the Employment and Labor Law Update web page at http://www.capital.org/lawupdate for additional information on the topics covered.  The 2012 conference will take place on May 2 and May 3 at the McKimmon Center in Raleigh.

2011 Ovation Award Spotlight: Novo Nordisk Pharmaceutical Industries, Inc.

Tuesday, May 31st, 2011

Novo Nordisk’s Clayton site began building a foundation for a strengths-based organization several years ago, and in 2008, the insulin production company decided to accelerate its use of strengths-based practices to build employee engagement and increase operating efficiency. The company’s approach and success of its initiative won the 2011 Ovation Award in the mid-size employer category (companies with 250 to 500 employees).

The Clayton site’s decision makers strongly believe that engaged employees desire to stay with an organization long term and strive to contribute to business success, which can lead to revenue growth. Through research, the organization learned that engaged workers are 20 percent more productive than those who are disengaged. With the Gallup Q12 Pyramid and the Clifton Strengthsfinder Inventory assessment already in use at the site, managers discovered that 85 percent of their own employees could be 20 percent more productive.

To implement the strengths-focused initiative, an OD consultant was certified by Gallup as a “strengths performance coach” to design a program allowing employees to discover their strengths and use their talents more effectively. Managers also developed and shared tools to learn employees’ strengths, such as using strengths language when talking with their direct reports.

Employees created individual development plans targeting their strengths. Novo Nordisk used the development plans to help employees gain skills and knowledge to become more effective contributors. The company also provided employees with strengths-based workshops, and all team members received one-on-one meetings with the boss to review their growth and development plan. The organization asked employees to reflect on their best work day in order to find areas of work that would energize them to recreate similar days.

Other strengths-based activities the Clayton site applied included:

  • Using strengths language during performance reviews
  • Creating teambuilding exercises
  • Requiring managers to track and record employee talents.

Once Novo Nordisk determined each employee’s key strengths, it redesigned its company structure to help them attain their goals.

Keeping the program’s momentum up, Novo Nordisk continued delivering its strengths-builder workshops to all 400 employees and created more teambuilding activities centered on appreciating the diversity of others. The Clayton site also developed a DVD showcasing best practices and tips for and from managers. Strengths-based activities are part of the company’s on-boarding process as well.

The organization has achieved success in several areas of its business since implementing its strengths-based program, and it continues to grow. The Clayton site has the shortest lead-time of all Novo Nordisk plants, is one of the premier new product launching sites, and its staff continues to break records on insulin produced per shift. Not only did the strengths-based approach earn the company a 2011 Ovation award, but the program helped the Clayton location remain the number one Novo Nordisk site based on high productivity and low cost.

For more information on how to implement a strengths-based plan for your organization, please contact Novo Nordisk’s Organizational Development Manager, Diane Cox at dncx@novonordisk.com.

CAI recognizes North Carolina companies for innovative HR/People solutions with Ovation Awards during its annual HR Management Conference in February.  If you’d like to be considered please send a 2-3 paragraph description of your program to doug.blizzard@capital.org.  The description should summarize the business need, describe how the solution was implemented, and highlight the measurable and/or forecasted business results.

Photo source: net_efekt

Government Audits: Readiness is Key

Tuesday, May 24th, 2011

Preparing your company for a government investigation is important as the current administration increases the amount of money and resources allocated to auditing companies from different industries and of various sizes. Although your company might follow correct policies and procedures mandated by the government, communication from a displeased worker or fault-finding town citizen can create cause for an investigator to review your workplace standards.

For some audits, such as an OSHA audit, inspections are conducted without advance warning to the organization, so attentiveness to rules and regulations is vital. Creating an action plan for the possibility of an inspection is critical to avoiding costs, penalties and loss of credibility associated with a bad review. Here are a few tips that are applicable to all audits and will ensure a successful evaluation:

  1. Keep Staff Informed! Even though some audits occur without warning, audits or investigations that are expected should be on everyone’s radar. Managers should be aware of the scope of the audit and when it is slated to take place. Company leadership should also inform employees that cooperating with the auditor is necessary to ensure a smooth review process.
  2. Organize! Organize! Organize! Employee documentation, computer files, financial information and similar records should be neatly arranged and easily accessible for the auditor. Retrieve records kept at off-site locations as well. Organizing documents before the auditor’s arrival will allow you to identify and locate missing or misfiled information. Failure to keep records readily available can result in a slower investigation process or several follow-up visits from the auditor.
  3. Take Interviews Seriously! No matter which type of audit your company encounters, preparing for questions that might arise is crucial. Some report that the initial management interview is the most influential part of the process, because it sets the course for the remainder of the audit. Demonstrating preparation during this component will alert the auditor that your company takes the investigation process seriously. For interviews with employees, allow the auditor to speak with them during work hours to avoid contacting them at home. Although you should avoid explicitly telling your employees what to do during an interview, it is important to make them aware of their rights during the process.

CAI offers an Investigation Survival Webinar Series for more information and tips that apply to audits. The program includes seven 90-minute webinars designed to guide you through various government investigations, including ICE, EEOC, Wage and Hour, and OSHA audits. Led by experienced professionals who have supported many employers through different investigations, the series will help answer any specific questions you have concerning audits. You can take the courses individually, or you can register for all seven and receive a volume discount.

For additional information or to register, please visit www.capital.org and use the search code CISWS.

Photos Source: erix!