Posts Tagged ‘Human Resource Management’

Separation Checklists are a Must!

Tuesday, July 18th, 2017

An employee’s separation requires a lot of preparation both prior to the last day and following the separation. This includes items such as a  replacement requisition, job knowledge sharing activities, file reviews, preparation for termination meeting, etc. Additional items may include everyday tasks like removing voicemail and email (so that you don’t have clients leaving messages in a “black hole.”) From a compliance perspective there are items like final payroll calculations, and benefit information processing.  With so many related activities there many opportunities for ‘misses’ that can create headaches for any size company. Because of all of the moving parts involved in employee separations, it is important for companies to have a checklist of action items to address upon the separation of an employee.

CAI recommends having two separation checklists –  The Involuntary Separation Checklist and The Separation checklist. The Involuntary Separation Checklist  can be used in situations where the employee is not aware of their upcoming departure from the company. The checklist is broken down into sections for the preparation of the separation (prior to the employee knowing about their termination) to after the employee has been notified. The Separation Checklist should be used for most employee separations.

Having a checklist in place will ensure employee exits go smoothly and that tasks aren’t missed. A smooth exit can also help minimize employee relations issues in knowing that the employee has all pertinent information needed for their separation (pay, benefits, etc).  It can also provide a paper trail if later down the road there are questions regarding an employee’s exit (“did the employee return their company keys?”)

CAI delivers HR, compliance, and people development solutions to 1,100+ NC companies to help them build engaged, well-managed and low-risk workplaces. Contact us to find out how we can help your company.

Emily’s primary area of focus is providing expert advice and support in the areas of employee relations and federal and state employment law compliance as a member of the Advice & Resolution team for CAI. Additionally, Emily advises business and HR leaders in operational and strategic human resources areas such as talent and performance management, employee engagement, and M&A’s. Emily has 10+ years of broad-based HR business partnering experience centering around employee relations, compliance & regulatory employment issues, strategic and tactical human resources, and strong process improvement skills.

Key Qualities for Promotion to Management

Tuesday, March 29th, 2011

There are two types of employees – those who view their work as a job and those who view their work as a component of a long-term career. Both professional types can excel in performance, but for employees who are career motivated, operating as a subordinate is not enough.

For the employee seeking to climb the company ladder, it’s important to understand the qualities companies seek, and what can currently be done to assist in career advancement. Consider the following as you strive to claim your seat in management.

Showcasing your worth –The benefits of internal promotions are obvious to the individual – increased finances, added respect from company peers and a voice that carries a greater influence and reach, but how does the company benefit from your advancement? To join the management team, your value needs to be recognized. Whether it’s generating additional revenue, cutting cost or bringing new insight, the benefit needs to be clear.

Solid working habits – Members of the management team share common characteristics of dependability and decision-making. Can you do what you say you’re going to do, when you say you’re going to do it? In moments of challenge, when answers need to be received, can you call the shots? It’s the reliability that companies count on from management that results in success.

Level of efficiency – Companies value the employee who is time-oriented. Because the speed at which you operate is fundamental, form a habit of completing work in an efficient manner. Understand the difference between critical assignments and those that can be put on hold. A majority of CEOs agree that employees on track for advancement have a keen ability to establish priorities and sift through the essentials.

Teaching abilities – An essential quality of management is that the person’s level of expertise can be relayed and transferred to other employees. You can perform well, but to manage, you need to be able to teach, support staff, communicate information and share knowledge clearly for others to follow.

Avoid silence – You may be the best person to ever fill your job, but if no one knows about your achievements, how will your work ever be recognized? In the business world, it helps to occasionally “toot your own horn.” Give updates on your success to supervisors, find a mentor within the company that can spread your praises, but most importantly, make your voice heard.

A management role is not appropriate for all individuals. If you’d like to be a manager, make it a point to concentrate on your present performance. Those currently sitting at the table are continuously evaluating employees for when the team is ready for expansion. What you are doing right now will be the leading factor in the decision process six months down the road.

For additional information, please call a member of CAI’s Advice and Counsel team at (919) 878-9222 or (336) 668-7746.

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