Posts Tagged ‘hiring’

Avoid Making Bad Hire Decisions

Thursday, April 7th, 2016

A great hire can inject a spark in your organization that will spread throughout your workforce and drive everyone to raise the bar.  Likewise, a bad hire can deflate your employees, costing time and resources to either train or replace them with a better fit.

The difference between a great hire and a bad hire can often rely on how the interview is conducted.  Below is a list of common mistakes made during the interview process that you will want to avoid.Bad-Employee - Bad Hire

Overlooking Important Skills

Interviewers will sometimes put too much emphasis on the specific skills required for a position while overlooking traits such as critical thinking or initiative, that are often harder to develop or come by naturally.  Organizational fit is at least as important as technical ability.  Many experts argue fit is more important.

Asking Hypothetical Questions

Some interviewers will ask questions such as “How would you handle a problem client?” or “How would you close a difficult sale?”  These hypothetical questions will yield hypothetical answers.  Instead, use “Tell me about how you once handled a problem client?” or “Tell me about the most difficult sale you had to close”.  These answers will relate real experiences for you to evaluate.

No Follow-up Questions

During an interview, some interviewers will ask only one or two questions regarding each job listed on the candidate’s resume.  Instead, dig deeper in order to get more information.  Zero in on a prior job that is closely related to your opening and spend some quality time on that experience.  The details of that job will give you a better idea of how qualified they are for this position.

InterviewingToo Much Talk About Company

Interviews that spend too much time on the company, its history, its product or services, etc., will yield little information on the candidate’s qualifications.  Remember, you are here to find out about this candidate and their experience.  A serious candidate will have already researched your company and would not be at the interview if they were not interested. Spend the limited amount of time you have on what is important – the candidate.  A good rule of thumb is that you shouldn’t be talking more than 20% of the interview time.

 

No Live Testing

As they say, “talk is cheap.”  Questions and answers during an interview worked fine in the past.  If you really want to separate your stars from the pack, simulate real activities the candidate will face.  For example, if interviewing candidates for a sales role, have them prepare a slide presentation of their qualifications and “sell” themselves to your team.  This “live test” cannot be conducted for every role, but use it where applicable.

Intimidation

Likely, there is already enough pressure on the candidate during an interview without deliberately adding more.  Some interviewers, however, will try to see how a candidate responds to high-pressure, intimidating interviews.  High pressure and intimidation is not the norm for the workplace or, at least, it should not be.  Therefore, it makes no sense to put the candidate through that.  It might backfire on you and you may lose a top candidate.

One-sided Viewpoint

A smart interviewer will be very candid and up-front with the candidate about both the positive and negative aspects of the job.  By only focusing on the positive aspects, the candidate will begin to wonder what you are not telling him/her.  This will lead to doubt about the position.  Honestly describing everything about the role, on the other hand, will lead to trust and will help you to avoid surprises down the line.

Inconsiderate or Unprofessional

Never start an interview late or cancel at the last minute without offering an apology.  Do not read your emails or accept phone calls during an interview.  This sends a message to the candidate that they are not important to you or your organization.

Average Attention for Above-average Candidates

Interviewers should remember the candidate is also interviewing the company during an interview session and afterwards.  Top candidates typically have multiple options from which to choose. If you are interested in a specific candidate, let them know by paying special attention to them after the interview. Send a thank-you email and provide them with your positive feedback on how you felt the interview went.  Have a manager or potential employee peer reach out to them and ask if they have any further questions.  Show definite signs of interest on your part in order to keep their interest.

Hire Personalities, Not Skills and Experience

Too often, we tend to want to hire people we like based on their personality or how well they get through an interview.  Do not fall into this trap.  At the end of the day, you want the brightest and most qualified people as a part of your workforce.  Everyone is different and diversity has a way of bringing out new ideas and new forms of collaboration that leads to greater productivity.

Making a bad hire decision wastes everyone’s time and will take some of the energy and momentum away from your company.  Avoiding these common mistakes during the interview process will give you the best potential for making a great hire and building your workforce with strong, qualified employees.
renee

Renee Watkins is on  CAI’s Advice & Resolution Team.   A seasoned HR professional with practical hands-on experience in various human resource functions, Renee provides solutions to retain and motivate outstanding workforces.  She also specializes in counseling and advising management for best practices, processes and strategies to support employee morale and organizational effectiveness.

Good Hiring Managers Make Effective Use of Data

Tuesday, April 5th, 2016

The following post is by Bruce Clarke, CAI’s CEO and President. The article originally appeared in Bruce’s News & Observer column, The View from HR.

Human Resources and management require soft and hard skills. Still, the best HR leaders and managers succeed primarily because of their soft skills in working with people. The ones who fail usually have inadequate soft skills.

Bruce Clarke, President and CEO

Bruce Clarke, President and CEO

Because HR and management professionals rely so much on their ability to advise, convince and problem solve, they too often underutilize hard skills that could make them even more effective. One hard skill that would make us all better is the regular and effective use of data.

I am not talking here about “big data”, the kind of server clogging repositories that allow marketers to slice you up into multiple consumer categories. No, I am talking about basic data every workplace has, or can easily obtain, to make much better decisions.

We meet employers frustrated with their inability to hire the right people for the job. “Where are the candidates?” “Which internet sites should we use?” Those are probably the wrong questions.

Finding success

A better place to start is where you have success today. Where did the best hires in the last two years come from? How did they find us? Which prospects did we successfully convert at a higher rate than others? Can we find out where this particular skill set “hangs out” digitally and how they prefer to send and receive communications?

When we make good hires but they do not stay long, why is that? Where are they going? What were the reasons? Are we avoiding the difficult pay decisions? Did we talk with them or just warn them not to violate their non-compete clause?

Some data is numerical and some is opinion information sliced in useful ways. For example, we conduct a 31 statement organizational assessment for member companies that asks management team members to rank how they think they are doing on important measures. When the team replies collectively we are at 1 or 2 on “we always hire the best people for the job”, there is a problem.

Right data

The value of HR and management data is to help frame the right questions. If we all agree the company does a poor job hiring great people, then we can ask if we want to improve, the benefits of improving, how we can improve and what resources are needed. Without this data, it is so easy for opinions to dominate and action to be delayed.

Author and businessman Andrew Glasow said: “The fewer the facts, the stronger the opinion.” A danger in HR is that the relative lack of traditional numerical data from accounting or operations allows us to hide from the facts. Yes, data must be interpreted, but an imperfect interpretation of reality is better than a mere reaction to anecdotes.

Employers should look for the data right in front of them in the form of opinions, results, behaviors, rankings, ratings, preferences, effectiveness, cost, market pricing, efficiency, rationale, alignment, purpose and points of agreement (or disagreement). It will be well worth the reasonable effort required to collect and analyze.

How to Create and Sustain a More Diverse Workforce

Thursday, March 31st, 2016

diversity

In today’s post, CAI’s HR Manager Melissa Short and Marketing Intern Andy Bradshaw discuss the strategies HR professionals should take in order to foster a diverse and inclusive organizational culture.

In 2013, Harvard Business Review conducted a survey of 1800 professionals that found a striking correlation between diversity and innovation in the workplace. The study examined what it terms “two-dimensional diversity”- which encompasses both inherent diversity, or traits you are born with such as gender and ethnicity, as well as acquired diversity, involving traits you gain from experience. The study referred to companies whose leaders exhibit at least three inherent and three acquired diversity traits as having two-dimensional diversity, and found that that companies with 2-D diversity out-innovate and out-perform others.

In fact, employees at these companies are 45% likelier to report that their firm’s market share grew over the previous year and 70% likelier to report that the firm captured a new market.

Though it may sound intuitive, the evidence for the business case for workplace diversity is significant. Along with carrying the obvious social value of creating a more inclusive, tolerant workplace, diversity in the office really can improve profits and your bottom line, as evidenced above.

Of course, most HR professionals don’t need to be told that diversity is important to the workplace, as they are most likely aware of its many benefits. Where many in HR may struggle with the process, however, is how to get started on tackling diversity initiatives with limited time and money. That’s where we’re here to help. By dividing the process into these easily digestible phases, you’ll not only be able to quickly lay the groundwork for a more diverse workplace, but also put your office on a path to sustaining this diversity going forward.

Selection and Hiring

To create a truly diverse workplace, you have to start at the beginning. Hiring people with different backgrounds may be an obvious way to improve diversity, but it takes a conscious effort to broaden recruiting efforts to reach those candidates. Here are a few ideas as to where to start this process:

  • Think about where you look for candidates. Are you looking in markets or roles that seek out membership associations, clubs, and publications with minority or underrepresented community audiences? Right here in the Triangle, you could be looking at reaching out to minority publications such as Que Pasa and The Triangle Tribune in order to place job postings.
  • But go beyond just posting a job to engaging and networking with the owners and employees in order to build longer term-genuine relationships.
  • Train and educate hiring managers on the importance of organizational diversity, particularly the business benefits. By ensuring the hiring team is aware of both the social and financial need for diversity in the office, HR can lead the charge to finding more qualified and diverse minority candidates.

Enhancing Organizational Inclusion

Once you’ve moved past the selection and hiring of a diverse pool of candidates, how will you ensure they want to stay at your organization? It takes a company-wide commitment to cultivate a culture of organizational inclusion. Employees want to work in an environment where they feel supported and valued for their differences and Human Resources plays a large role in driving this culture. Here’s how HR can permeate inclusion throughout their organization’s culture:

  • Go beyond handbook policies that cover anti-discrimination laws and consider including an organizational statement that addresses the company’s commitment to an environment of support and inclusion.
  • Revisit your dress guidelines to ensure that you aren’t inadvertently excluding items that are cultural or religious in nature.
  • Demonstrate a company commitment to utilizing minority-owned or managed businesses for key vendor relationships.
  • Regularly review your pay system to identify and correct any pay inequities.

Sustaining diversity going forward

Now that you’ve planted the seeds of diversity within your organization, HR must do its part to ensure it continues to grow and prosper moving forward. Creating a diverse workplace is one thing, but what about keeping it that way? Here are a few tips to ensure your diverse workplace is here to stay:

  • Ensure your minority employees have equal access to opportunities through the use of a minority mentorship program. This will not only give minority employees a space for engagement and advancement but also breaks down barriers between generations and other boundaries at work
  • Train managers and all employees on cultural awareness and inclusion – this can be as simple as an online training course or even sharing an article or case study around this subject.
  • Educate your front line managers around the business and social benefits of diversity and teach them to recognize any signs that point otherwise.
  • Be transparent around your intent to create and sustain a diverse and inclusive work environment and the company practices that support it. By openly showcasing your organization’s commitment to diversity and inclusion, you will continue to create a culture that fosters these ideals and attract employees who are dedicated to fulfilling them.

Though the process may seem overwhelming, it is imperative that HR leads the charge for a more diverse and inclusive workplace. By following these phases, you can foster a sense of inclusion that will transform your business for the better, both culturally and financially. For any other helpful tips about how to create a more diverse workplace, please let us know in the comments!

How to Lose Your Best Employees in 10 Easy Steps

Tuesday, January 12th, 2016

Michelle Smith, VP of Marketing at O.C. Tanner

In anticipation of CAI’s upcoming HR Management Conference, one of this year’s speakers, Michelle Smith, shares the 10 toxic practices that will cause your business to lose its top talent.

Named one of the most influential women in the incentive industry, Michelle M. Smith, CPIM, CRP, is an accomplished international author and speaker, Past-President of the FORUM at Northwestern University, President Emeritus of the Incentive Marketing Association, Vice-President of Research for the Business Marketing Association, and Vice-President of Marketing for O.C. Tanner.

What could be more essential to both organizational success and the corporate bottom line than talent?

Most of us would agree that having the right talent is crucial for success and sustainability, yet many of the people in our employ continue to be marginalized and neglected, often taking a backseat to the various other matters that occupy our workdays as leaders.

And the problem seems to be pervasive.

While writing The Talent Mandate: Why Smart Companies Put People First, author Andrew Bennett spoke with a prominent business school professor who noted improvements and innovations in every area of business – except in talent management. In fact, the professor said no corporate function today lags behind as dramatically as how we manage the employees for which we are responsible.

That’s astonishing, and it’s also lunacy when the ‘War for Talent’ continues to rage and employee costs represent a majority of corporate expenses.

These things will cause your best people to leave

The author suggests we keep doing the following if we want to free ourselves from our brightest, most dynamic, and highest-potential employees:

1. Hire for the past, not the future. Choose talent based on what worked before, not on where the company is heading now. Emphasize candidates’ narrow former experience over a more generalized, nimble agility to adapt in a fast-changing world.

2. Downplay values and mission. Send the signal that anything goes in pursuit of profit, making employees guess about what choices are truly acceptable. Fail to spend time articulating to your workers why they come to work every day and how the greater community benefits from their efforts.

3. Bungle the teams. Avoid mixing generations and skill sets, instead grouping like with like and producing stale and predictable solutions that are safe and excite no one.

4. Put jerks into management.Reward the old-fashioned, autocratic style that stifles unorthodox, creative thinking and feels threatened by fresh ideas, energy and dynamism.

5. Measure hours, not results. Keep an expensive cadre of stern enforcers busy with policing everybody. Don’t trust your talent to use their time wisely. Crack down on social media. Forbid personal activities during the workday, even as you continue to expect work to be conducted long into the night and over the weekend.

6. Promote people straight up the ladder. Fail to give employees exposure to different parts of the business through lateral moves or cross-training, giving them the sensation of being narrowed over time, rather than being broadened and improved.

7. Leave talent management exclusively to HR. Expect the professionals who must deal with an increasingly complicated variety of personnel issues to also be exceptional visionaries in hiring. Detach the C-Suite and other leaders from talent recruitment and development since it’s not their department.

8. Hoard information. Keep decision-making securely ensconced in the executive wing. Avoid empowering mid-tier managers or employees lest they suddenly become entrepreneurial and unpredictable.

9. Don’t bother with training. It’s costly, and employees will probably jump ship with their new skills. Instead, have your workers do the same tasks over and over in the very same way.

10. Hire outsiders. After you’ve failed to train and develop your best people, follow it up by stifling their ambitions for increased responsibility. When they come to you and say, “I’m leaving,” express astonishment and outrage.

If these sound at all familiar, you’d better hope your competitors are following the same game plan or your organization could be in big trouble.

Either way, all is not lost. Please join me on March 10th at the HR Management Conference for “Winning the War for Talent in a People-Led Economy” to learn more about how to attract, develop and retain the best talent.

The presentation is full of tested research, insights, and tools for HR leaders to advance their organizations and their own careers. The session will help those looking to evolve professionally, or to be viewed more strategically by senior leadership, as these concepts can fundamentally change the future of leadership, recognition and engagement. I look forward to seeing you there!

 

Transform Your Business With These 5 New Year’s Resolutions

Thursday, January 7th, 2016

In today’s post, CAI’s HR Business Partner Tom Sheehan shares the important resolutions HR professionals should be aiming to tackle in the New Year.

The New Year is here, and I imagine many of you will have already set goals you hope to achieve by the end of 2016.  As HR professionals, odds are attracting and retaining talent will be some of your top priorities for the year.  To meet these goals, I would like to call your attention to five resolutions that if followed will be instrumental in creating success for your business this year.

  1. Narrow the Front Door to Close the Back Door
    Commit to improve the screening and selection processes to ensure that poor fit candidates don’t join the organization. In particular, use structured interview questions to assess for cultural fit, and incorporate realistic job previews. In short, by acting as the ‘gatekeeper of talent’ and narrowing the front door, you will reduce the unnecessary turnover of employees leaving via the backdoor.
  2. Hire for Attitude, Train for Skill
    Winston Churchill famously said that ‘Attitude is a little thing that makes a BIG DIFFERENCE.’ It is much easier to train a new hire on a set of work skills than to correct issues with their attitude. If you want to know about their attitude, check their references thoroughly.
  3. Onboard New Hires with Real Purpose
    Make certain that the new hire process utilizes a formal, scripted plan for the first 90 days. Include check-in points for an HR representative to make sure things are still on track. Hold the hiring manager accountable for ensuring that the process unfolds according to plan.
  4. Dump the ‘once a year’ Performance Review
    Resolve to make the performance management process something more than a ‘check-the-box’ exercise. Train managers on how to give performance feedback on a regular basis. Encourage managers to have weekly one-on-ones with their staffs. At a minimum, there should be a formal mid-year check-in between the employee and the manager.
  5. Do Less Better
    In our zeal to please (and support) our internal customers, HR has traditionally had a hard time saying ‘No’. As a result, we are often overextended and inefficient. Endeavor to prioritize your HR initiatives and select fewer projects to start. In doing so, you will improve execution and results.

Follow these resolutions and you will likely find a positive impact across your organization. Not only can it help transform your business for the better, but it also will improve the credibility and faith in HR and establish a reputation and culture for doing things the right way.

For further questions about how to achieve your HR resolutions in the New Year, please contact our Advice & Resolution team at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746.

10 HR Practices that Destroy Small Business Productivity – Letting Poor Performance Slide

Thursday, May 21st, 2015

In today’s video blog, CAI’s VP of Membership, Doug Blizzard, continues his series on the ten HR practices that destroy productivity. This month Doug focuses on poor performers and how letting them slide drains company productivity, profit and growth.

Doug asks employers to think about poor performers in their lives and how the consequences of their actions can cause frustration for others. He then shares how poor performers can negatively impact top performers.

Offering insights from management thought-leader Bruce Tulgan, Doug says that “undermanagement” is one of the most detrimental phenomenon affecting businesses today.  Doug shares that poor performers come in three categories:

  • They don’t know what do
  • They can’t do what you’re asking
  • They won’t do what you’re asking

He continues the conversation with a mention of hiring practices. Many performance problems are really hiring problems in disguise.  To prevent problems, Doug advises employers to take more time assessing candidates.

If you’d like help managing your poor performers, please call CAI’s Advice and Resolution Team at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746.

 

Free eBook Gives Organizations Advice on Employee Relations from Hiring to Firing

Tuesday, September 17th, 2013

ebook_1_2013Employees are a critical factor in determining whether your organization and its various departments will meet your business goals. Who you recruit to join the organization is just as important as who you decide to let go from the organization.

Finding the right employees for your new positions and managing your current employees well will help you build a company that can survive difficult economic environments and confront new business challenges head on.

CAI is providing employers a free eBook aimed at helping them make informed decisions on the hiring and firing practices at their organizations. The eBook Hiring and Firing: Hello, Goodbye & Everything in Between is a resource of several articles that include tips and information for job seekers and employers on finding a match that will enable both groups to flourish.

The following are some of the chapters included in this eBook:

•Social Media for Job Hunters

•Turn a Poor Interview to Your Advantage

•A Good Termination

•The Single Question Interview

•You Owe It to Each Other

If you are a CAI member, you can download the free eBook directly here: http://bit.ly/eBookm.

If you’d like to download the eBook but you are not a CAI member, please visit here and submit your request: http://bit.ly/eBooknm.

CAI’s Advice and Counsel Team is another resource for receiving guidance around good employer practices for recruiting employees and also letting employees go. Contact a team member at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746.

4 Tips to Act Like a Detective When Hiring Job Candidates

Thursday, May 30th, 2013

CAI’s Director of Membership, Doug Blizzard, offers several strategies to help you make solid hiring decisions in today’s video post. He suggests that you act like a detective during the interview and hiring process to make sure your new hire is the right person to do the job. Doug says that organizations should objectively piece together clues to find their new employee. However, many hiring managers act like first-time car buyers—nervous, unprepared, settle for the first thing they find, etc.

As a detective, Doug encourages you to take your time during the hiring process. Actively find out if job candidates have the character and credentials to fill your open position. Doug gives you four ways to pull off a successful investigation:

1)      Screen for Organizational Fit

Many leading companies believe cultural or organizational fit are more important than specific job skills. Hire someone who fits your workplace culture, and you’ll likely spend less time dealing with a bad hire who affects the morale and performance of your other employees. Doug says you can’t teach character. He lists several ways to screen for organizational fit in the video.

2)       Require Letters of Reference

Doug suggests having your job candidates provide you with two letters of reference—one personal and one professional. The letters will tell you a lot about the candidate and help you indentify the type of character your candidate has.

3)      Ask Behavior-Based Interview Questions

Job candidates are prepared for standard interview questions, such as their strengths, weaknesses and even what type of animal they’d be. However, Doug says the best predictor of success is past results. Identify success factors for your company’s available position, and ask your candidates how they were able to have similar results at their workplace.

4)      Perform Background Checks

In the video, Doug says the cost to perform background checks pales in comparison to the price of a bad hire. Fifty-three percent of all job applications contain errors so performing this step is crucial.

If you have additional questions or would like more information to help you with your hiring process, please call a member of CAI’s Advice and Counsel Team at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746.

6 Tips to Help You Think Like a Sales Person to Find Top Talent

Tuesday, April 30th, 2013

CAI’s Director of Member Development, Doug Blizzard, shares advice for finding high-performing talent in today’s video post. He offers a reason as to why employers are struggling to find top talent:

“…it may be because you’re looking in the same places, in the same ways, and at the same time as everybody else.”

He goes on to say that finding top talent today requires a new approach. He suggests learning from the world of sales to benefit your recruiting efforts. Doug details six lessons that you and your organization can borrow from your sales team:

1.       Start Your Process Early

Landing the best account takes time in sales. Don’t be desperate in your hunt for a new team member because you will find desperate job applicants. Doug says to get great people you need to start the recruiting process well in advance of the opening.

 

2.       Put Your Goals in Writing

In the video, Doug shares that the top sales people all have incredibly clear goals and a written plan to accomplish their goals. For recruiting people for your company’s critical roles, he suggests that you create and keep a list of people you want to hire. These are your sales targets.

 

3.       Define Your Ideal Candidate

Doug says the best sales people win more business because they only focus on ideal prospects, so make sure your team has determined who the ideal candidate is in regard to skills and fit. If you’re not sure what to look for, Doug suggests asking your best employees because they will want your team to attract great coworkers.

 

4.       Get Known in Your Industry

In order to get known by high-performing talent, you must get known in your industry. Doug encourages you to find out what associations your prospects belong to, events they attend and social media platforms they participate on. In the video, Doug lays out several ways to be more visible to your prospects, as well as in your industry. He says these efforts will help you identify your top candidates and also draw them to you.

 

5.       Create a Regular Touch System

Once you find your top prospects, Doug says you should implement a touch system of regular contact with them in order to pull them towards your company. He suggests that you mix up the medium you use. The touch system could include emails, phone calls, snail mail, etc. You’ll also want to mix up the content you send, so share information about your industry, specific professions, and other data your prospects will find useful. Be creative and make sure to include information about your organization.

 

6.       Create a Clear Value Proposition

The best sales people sell on value according to Doug. Relating this to employers, he says you must be able to clearly articulate to your prospects why they should come work for you. It can’t only be in terms of pay and benefits, he warns. Work to uncover their needs and match them to your workplace environment. Show them how coming to work for your organization will get them where they need to be.

For additional guidance on recruiting like a sales person, please contact Doug Blizzard at 919-713-5244 or Doug.Blizzard@capital.org.

 

E-Monitoring in the Workplace: Do’s and Do Not’s

Tuesday, July 26th, 2011

The e-monitoring of what employees do in the workplace may include the use of video surveillance, keystroke logger software, email filters, phone logs, phone call recordings, Global Positioning Systems, and logs of website visits, among other methods.

Although courts have tended to reject infringement of privacy claims based on employer e-monitoring, the best course of action is to have a company policy that clearly states which communications are subject to monitoring—including when, where and why. Most employees believe that it is okay for their employer to monitor them only if they are made aware of the fact that they are being monitored. The company that monitors employees secretly is only asking for trouble.

Here are the do’s and do not’s of e-monitoring in the workplace.

DO:

  • Create and distribute a company policy that lets employees know what is being monitored, when it is monitored, where it is monitored, and why monitoring is necessary.
  • Be sure to state what benefits monitoring will bring to the company as a whole.
  • Monitor only what is absolutely necessary. Company management should not be perceived as an intrusive or abusive “Big Brother.”
  • Ensure that the personnel who have access to the monitored information have a “need to know.” Access must be limited to only certain highly trusted individuals.
  • Securely store the data collected, particularly when it includes sensitive information, and let employees know that this data is not available for internal or external public disclosure.
  • Address employee use of social media sites such as Twitter, Facebook or blogging during work hours. Company policy should provide guidelines for blogging or tweeting about the company, its personnel and its products and services.

DO NOT:

  • Do not make employees feel paranoid or uncomfortable.
  • Do not place severe restrictions on employees’ use of cell phone and text message communications. Granted, you do not want drivers sending text messages or being distracted by cell phone calls while on the job, but in most workplaces, the safe and occasional use of personal cell phones rarely disrupts work processes.
  • Do not implement technologies such as webcams, location tracking devices or keyloggers on company laptops or other resources without a thorough understanding of the technology’s capabilities and rigorous legal review.
  • Do not neglect to address employees’ use of their personal Internet-based email accounts using company resources such as computers or company-issued cell phones. Any restrictions should be clearly stated in your company policy on e-monitoring.
  • Do not try to completely restrict employees’ use of the Internet in a prohibitive manner. You will create goodwill when employees are allowed to surf the Web during lunch hours or breaks to quickly look up the address of a restaurant or to order products online.

Breaches of employee privacy can result in litigation or employee retention issues at the very least. Approach e-monitoring with a healthy respect for privacy laws and today’s complex regulatory environment, as well as sensitivity to ordinary human behavior, and you will be successful.

For additional information about e-monitoring in the workplace, please call a member of CAI’s Advice and Counsel team at (919) 878-9222 or (336) 668-7746.

Photo source: Ed Yourdon