Posts Tagged ‘Hiring Process’

Immigration Compliance and Form I-9

Tuesday, September 27th, 2016

Pursuant to the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 (IRCA) employers are prohibited from hiring or continuing to employ foreign nationals who lack authorization to work in the United States. That law requires employers to verify the identity and work authorization of all new hires, and it establishes civil and criminal penalties for noncompliance. IRCA establishes a system of employment eligibility verification procedures that all employers must follow when filling a job. Employers are obliged to be an integral part of the government’s efforts to reduce illegal immigration.formi-9

IRCA makes it unlawful for any employer in the United States to knowingly “hire or to recruit or refer for a fee” or to knowingly “continue to employ” an individual who lacks authorization to be employed in the United States. The law applies to any employee hired after November 6, 1986. Employees hired prior to November 7, 1986, are “grandfathered,” and their status need not be verified.

To comply with the law, employers must verify the identity and employment authorization of each person they hire, complete and retain a Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification, for each employee, and refrain from discriminating against individuals on the basis of national origin or citizenship.

Employers must require all newly-hired employees to confirm their identity and eligibility to work in the United States.  Employers must complete Form I-9 for each person hired to perform labor or services in the United States in return for wages or other remuneration. Remuneration is anything of value given in exchange for labor or services. I-9 forms must be retained for specified periods of time including even after the employment relationship has ended, and it must be made available in the event of an audit or inspection. These compliance requirements apply to every new employee regardless of citizenship or alienage, even if there is no doubt as to the individual’s identity and employment authorization.

To confirm identity and employment eligibility, every new hire must produce an original document or a combination of documents that are designated by the federal government to satisfy that requirement.  A list of the acceptable documents is found on the last page of the Form I-9. The employer must accept whatever document or combination of documents from the List that the employee offers, so long as the document is original, unexpired, relates to the employee and shows no signs of tampering or counterfeiting.

The employer must ensure that the employee completes Section 1 of Form I-9 at the time of hire. “Hire” means when employment begins in exchange for wages or other remuneration begins. The time of hire is noted on the form as the first day of employment. Employees may complete Section 1 of Form I-9 before the time of hire, but no earlier than acceptance of the job offer. Review the employee’s document(s) and fully complete Section 2 of Form I-9 within three business days of the hire.

As you perhaps know the current I-9 form technically expired this past March 31.  However, until further notice employers should continue using this version until the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) approves and issues an updated I-9 form. The public was able to provide comments on the proposed I-9 changes until April 27, 2016.  For a detailed summary of the proposed changes, see USCIS Seeks Comments on Proposed Changes to From I-9 webpage.

If you need help thinking through an Immigration issue or want to dive deeper into this topic please reach out to our Advice & Resolution team.



CAI Advice & Resolution team member Renee Watkins is a seasoned HR professional with a diverse background in Human Resource. Renee provides CAI members with practical advice in a wide-range of human resource functions including conflict resolution, compliance and regulatory issues, and employee relations.

The Role Social Media Plays in the Job Application Process

Tuesday, July 26th, 2016

ICIMS, a software company specializing in applicant tracking systems, has released their “2015 Job Seekers Get Social” report, detailing how social networks are playing a role in the recruiting and hiring process.  Information contained in social networks such as LinkedIn, Google+, and Facebook is being used to populate data within online job applications.

Job seekers use their social networks to find job opportunities, research companies, share job openings with friends and get feedback from current and former employees regarding the inside intel on organizations they are considering working for.

According to the survey, 3.3 million applications were submitted online in 2015.  Sixty-one percent (61%) of these applications came via LinkedIn, 22% came through Google+ and 17% were populated using Facebook. Fifty-seven percent (57%) of all job seekers surveyed indicated they rely on social media at least once a month to research possible employers.

Of the industry verticals included in the survey, job openings in Information Technology, Construction, and Leisure & Hospitality received the highest number of online applications via social networks.  Public Administration, Financial Services, and Education & Health Services received the smallest number of online job applications fed by social networks.

Employers who do not fully embrace the potential effect of social networks on the recruiting and hiring process in today’s job market run the risk of losing out to their competitors when it comes to attracting top talent.  By allowing job seekers to apply with their LinkedIn, Google+, or Facebook accounts, companies can offer candidates a quick and easy way to express interest in open jobs, protecting recruiting investments, and boosting the candidate experience and talent pipeline.

Need help figuring out how to best use social media for your recruiting purposes? Reach out to our Advice & Resolution team.



CAI Advice & Resolution team member Renee Watkins is a seasoned HR professional with a diverse background in Human Resource. Renee provides CAI members with practical advice in a wide-range of human resource functions including conflict resolution, compliance and regulatory issues, and employee relations.

Recruiting is not rocket science, or is it?

Tuesday, June 21st, 2016

recruiting_the_bestPerhaps you’ve heard the name Elon Musk. He’s got quite a résumé. Musk is the CEO of SpaceX, an American aerospace manufacturer and space transport services company. His company builds rockets that send people and cargo into space.  Musk is realizing his vision at SpaceX by building simple and relatively inexpensive reusable rockets that go into space multiple times. He hopes to achieve turnaround time capabilities that are similar to commercial airliners.

Oh, by the way, Musk is also the CEO and product architect of Tesla Motors and cofounder of PayPal.

I tell you this because of how Elon Musk views the importance of hiring great talent. Musk’s recruiting strategy at SpaceX is to demand the best person on the planet — whether they were there to build a rocket or serve ice cream on campus.

Dolly Singh, SpaceX’s former Director of Talent quoted Musk as saying, “Find me the single best person on the freaking planet, then convince me why out of how many billion people on the planet that this is that guy.”  Singh continued, “And he does that even if it’s the cook. When we built a yogurt booth inside of SpaceX, he said, ‘Go to Pinkberry and find me the employee of the month, and I want to hire the employee of the month.’”

The point is, Musk as one of the most innovative and successful business leaders in the world, is still laser-focused on hiring great talent. He understands that bringing in mediocre talent will likely prevent him from realizing his dreams.

The late Steve Jobs, cofounder, CEO and Chairman of Apple Inc. believed in hiring A players.  According to Jobs, “A small team of A+ players can run circles around a giant team of B and C players.”  A-players are motivated, engaged and creative. They are performance-driven and have high expectations for themselves and for others. B and C-players, on the other hand, often do just enough to get by and to be paid for it.

We can learn a valuable lesson from Musk, and Jobs…Settling for ‘so-so’ talent will likely get you ‘so-so’ results. So the next time you are looking to hire someone, think like a rocket scientist and hire only the best.

CAI helps more than 1,000 North Carolina employers with their HR needs including talent acquisition process or strategies.  Contact CAI today!



Tom Sheehan brings 20+ years of extensive, broad based strategic, tactical and practical HR experience to CAI’s Advice & Resolution team.  He advises HR and other business leaders on talent management, organizational effectiveness, employee engagement, M&A’s, and employee relations.

Creating a Consumer Experience for Candidates and Employees

Thursday, May 26th, 2016

We are all aware of the changing dynamics in recruitment, employment and retention.  Companies should think of potential applicants and employeesRecruiting_and_Retention as consumers and create an experience that meets the candidate/employee needs as well as company needs to attract and retain the talent they need.

Technology, globalization, and the increased demand for top talent have changed the workplace landscape.  People can market themselves and access  information on companies and job opportunities to “shop” for what best aligns with their desires for organizational fit and personal growth.  That makes it more important than ever to think of candidates/employees as consumers and to make their experience a “delightful” one.

We have heard a lot recently about transparency.  Candidates searching for job opportunities want to learn as much as possible about potential employers up front.   Social media has made it easier for candidates to search for information on prospective employers (and vice versa).  What information is available to candidates online regarding your company from an employee feedback, social responsibility, and culture, etc. perspective?  How do you manage your organization’s social media profile?

After putting the best foot forward to hire and on-board top candidates that are the best fit for your organization, the consumer efforts shouldn’t stop here.  Treating employees as consumers and being interested in their aspirations and needs supports efforts to retain and engage employees.

According to Steve Lopez, Manpower Group, Companies talk about retention, but the culture does not always support that.  The rewards, measurement, and work environment often support retaining people in a job rather than retaining people within the organization. He proposes a consumer model for employee retention with the following components:

  • The User Experience – what are the goals, objectives and motivations for considering the job and staying with the company?
  • Content – Do you openly share the company culture, job content and expectations, opportunities for advancement and growth?
  • Functionality – What systems are in place to meet the user needs on a day-to-day basis in terms of exchange of information to support organizational needs as well as employee needs (two-way communication, receptive to employee feedback/suggestions, development plans)?
  • Interaction/Information/Navigation – Make resources available throughout the employee/consumer experience to provide what employees need to do their jobs.  This starts with the on-boarding process to educate new employees about the organization, to inform employees how to best obtain responses to their questions, inform them of tools they need and how to access various resources, etc.
  • Visual Experience – Does the desired visual experience for the employee reflect your company brand, web presence, culture, and the physical work space?

By approaching your employees as consumers you can create a world class experience and culture for your entire workforce, which enables positive business results. CAI can help with your company with talent acquisition, talent management, developing a better workplace and more.

(Source: Rethinking Retention, Steve Lopez, Manpower Group)

Supreme Court and Technical Flaws of Background Checking Paperwork

Thursday, May 19th, 2016

The alarm bells for employers have been sounding for the last few years about getting your federal Fair Credit Reporting Act paperwork in order.  The proliferation of class action lawsuits around Printproper release forms and the pre-adverse and adverse action paperwork has cost companies millions of dollars.  In large part, the class action suits have been driven by a Ninth Circuit Court (the federal court that covers California) ruling that identified that technical flaws in your company’s background checking documents was “injury” enough to have standing.  This change in the barrier to having standing in federal court made the creation of class action lawsuits very easy to file, and to win.

The new six to two ruling sends the matter back to the Ninth Circuit, but essentially states that in many cases the plaintiffs have to show some injury beyond a technical flaw in the company’s process.  Will this ruling abate the rising tide of FCRA driven class action lawsuits?  Only time will tell.

Making critical hiring decisions for your company is a huge responsibility. Not only is it critical to the success of the company, but also the safety of your employees and getting it right isn’t easy. Last year, approximately 90% of businesses in the US did some sort of background check on prospective employees to help protect their companies against the significant liabilities of negligent hiring lawsuits.

Unfortunately, the number of businesses out of compliance with the latest background checking standards grows every year and regrettably, most hiring professionals do not realize it until they are named in ever more frequent class action lawsuits.

Chances are that you are ordering background checks, but are you compliant?

Background checks compiled by third parties, such as CAI’s detective agency*, are covered by the federal Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA).  The FCRA covers more than financial records; it also includes reports that research criminal records, employment records, education information, driving records and even something as simple as an address history.  The FCRA was broadened in scope in 1997, and is designed to provide a safeguard for the applicant who has an adverse action taken against them based upon the results reported in the background investigation.  That is, if the applicant is denied an employment opportunity in whole or part by information contained in a background check, he or she has the right to view the information and dispute the record.

How do you comply?

  1. Have a permissible purpose (employment).
  2. Obtain written consent from the applicant.
  3. Run the check through a reputable third party Consumer Reporting Agency (CRA), like CAI.
  4. Look at the results and decide if the applicant fits the needs of your company:
    1. If the record is clean, keep the authorization form in a secure place.
    2. If the applicant is not hired due to something uncovered in the background check, then you should do the following:
      1. Mail a copy of the report, and
      2. a summary of the applicant’s rights under the FCRA, and
      3. a pre-adverse action letter [that includes the third party’s (CRA’s) name and contact info to the applicant].
      4. If your company is in North Carolina, you also want to send a copy of the NC Security Freeze to the applicant.
      5. After a reasonable amount of time (around five business days) you want to mail the declination letter to your applicant. During this time you should hold the position to give the applicant a chance to respond.
      6. After the “reasonable time” you may hire the appropriate applicant, thus filling the position.
      7. Store the rejected applicant’s signed written consent for six years.  SHRM recommends that you store the negative report for two years.

Hiring can be very stressful and CAI knows that it is better to get it right the first time.

Kevin von der Lippe

Kevin W. von der Lippe is a licensed private investigator at CAI and for 19 years has managed our detective agency and background checking business.  He is security minded and proficient with the federal Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) and the enforcement of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as administered by the EEOC as it relates to background checks. Capital Associated Industries Services Corporation is a licensed investigative agency, specializing in corporate pre-employment background screening. Our corporate agency license is BPN 001473P11.

Contact Kevin at 336-899-1150 or or

Assessing New Graduates When Hiring

Tuesday, May 17th, 2016

Interviews typically focus on both the education and the work experience of the candidate. In the case of recent graduates, however, the work experience is often not as much a factor to behiring recent graduates considered.

Below are some ideas that you could integrate into your interview process with new graduates that may provide additional insight into their readiness for entering the workforce and your organization.

What do you plan to contribute to the organization?

Ask your candidate what they feel they can contribute as a new hire, knowing what they know about your organization already and applying their education to this position.

Demonstrate job-specific skills

If the opening is in marketing, ask them to prepare a press release about the organization. If the opening is for a software engineer, provide a short test to assess their skill level.

Temp to perm

Many companies will bring an employee on first as a contractor to assess their skills and performance before making a permanent offer of employment.

Interview outside of the box

Invite a candidate to lunch with a current client or ask them to review a live proposal the company is working on and provide their input. This will give you an idea of how the candidate responds to different, non-standard interview situations and how well they think on their feet.

Focus less on experience, more on trainability

Naturally, most new graduates will not have a lot of experience in the beginning. Focus the interview questions and evaluate their responses around their ability to be trained for the current opening. Can they take direction? Do they appear to be open-minded? Are they eager to learn?

Provide a real world problem to solve

During the interview process, pair the candidate with an employee who is currently working on a problem in their field of study. Get feedback from the employee on how well they responded under pressure and if they were able to contribute to the process. Their ideas do not have to solve the problem, or even be good ideas. The more important thing is that they had ideas and were able to collaborate with others.

Are we a good fit for you?

Most interviews focus on why the candidate is a good fit for the company. Turn it around and ask the candidate why the company would be a good fit for them. This will provide some insight as to what they are expecting from your organization and what interests them about the job.  This insight may also help with retention down the road, should an offer of employment be extended.



CAI Advice & Resolution team member Renee Watkins is a seasoned HR professional with a diverse background in Human Resource. Renee provides CAI members with practical advice in a wide-range of human resource functions including conflict resolution, compliance and regulatory issues, and employee relations.

Plan Now for Long-Term Staffing Needs

Thursday, May 5th, 2016

When solving a problem, there are usually two positions from which to attack — reactive and proactive.  There was a time when a reactive approach was sufficient to fill open positions in a timely manner.  However, as the competition for top talent continues to increase, Human Resources professionals have to incorporate a more proactive approach to staying on top of recruiting needs.

Today’s HR professionals are normally swamped with responsibilities such as benefits administration, time tracking, regulatory and compliancetemporary employees reporting, payroll management and other reporting projects. These additional tasks leave little time to adequately recruit for an opening before the position must be filled. Therefore, you may not always end up with the best candidate due to a shortage of time.  “Often times companies enlist the help of temporary staff to help free up staff, so they can focus on these types of longer term needs,” states CAI’s Molly Hegeman.  “Assessing your team’s bandwith upfront will be critical to your success.”

Recruiters have begun thinking beyond the immediate needs and are taking steps to identify and plan for the long-term with regard to staffing.  Using data already available, HR professionals are forecasting future job openings months, or even years, in advance to proactively begin recruiting now.  This provides an organization with a recruiting advantage when competing with other companies for top talent.

Here are a few things you can do to help create a proactive recruiting strategy:

Identify Strategic vs Tactical Roles

Every role is important to the organization, but some roles are more important than others.  Take each role within your company, from top to bottom, and define it as strategic or tactical.  Strategic roles incorporate the overall strategy and vision of the company. Tactical roles are responsible for executing the plan by working together on the goals of the company. This distinction will help to assign priorities when recruiting for multiple positions.

Define Ideal Candidate Traits

List the traits of your ideal candidate for a specific position.  In addition to technical skills, education and experience include characteristics that are important for the candidate to fit in with the corporate culture, values and principles.  Look for the ideal soft skills for the best overall fit in a new recruit.

Research Supply and Demand

Some HR professionals with years of experience at a company, and in a specific area, may already have a working knowledge of the availability of candidates for open positions in their industry.  There is no substitute for hard data, however.  Take advantage of surveys and statistics regarding in-demand job skills, which competitors are hiring, compensation figures and other data to understand the level of difficulty required to fill each in-demand role within your organization.

Create Your Pipeline Now

Begin to create your long-range pipeline of candidates now by starting discussions and building relationships with “passive” candidates via social and professional networks such as Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.  Posting information about the types of positions your company routinely recruits for is a good way to attract candidates to your website and open a channel for communication.  Searching these networks for skill sets will lead you to potential candidates who may not be looking for an opportunity, but would like to hear more about your company.  Starting conversations and interaction early will create “warm” leads when you begin to actively recruit.



CAI Advice & Resolution team member Renee Watkins is a seasoned HR professional with a diverse background in Human Resource. Renee provides CAI members with practical advice in a wide-range of human resource functions including conflict resolution, compliance and regulatory issues, and employee relations.


Find, Develop and Keep the Best Employees

Tuesday, May 3rd, 2016

The following post is by Bruce Clarke, CAI’s CEO and President. The article originally appeared in Bruce’s News & Observer column, The View from HR.

Bruce Clarke, President and CEO

Bruce Clarke, President and CEO

When the economy crashes, a blindfolded rhinoceros could find good people to fill open jobs. When labor markets tighten, great hires are in short supply again. It is a cycle as predictable as the tides. Finding, developing and keeping great talent is not complex. It is hard, expensive and time consuming. It means you know what the role requires, what your culture rewards and what your tolerance is for variations. Tight labor markets mean it is time to think differently. Our organization teaches best and next practices to HR professionals and managers. Here are some tips for small and mid-size employers.

People are Human

Every employee eventually reveals their humanity. The key to great hiring is learning what makes this applicant human before you make the hire.  Internal hires, promotions, employee referrals, social networks and live networking give you free previews. References will lie and interviews are usually terrible predictors of future success.  Certain assessment tools will help, if you understand which tool suits your specific needs. Maximize your funnel of applicants that you know something about! Fill that funnel in advance of a need.

Be Specific and Demanding

Spend as much time screening out as you do screening IN. How will you find the best fit if you cave on your criteria early? Look for legitimate job-related reasons to eliminate applicants:  not typos on resumes, but a true lack of skills, experience, desire, capacity and fit. You may have time to purposefully modify your requirements later. For now, stick to your guns.

Interview for Successful Experience

If the role requires experience or judgment, spend interview time on these things. This is not the time to explain your company culture or role requirements. This is the time to test for them. If an applicant cannot describe their solid sales process, it is unlikely they will be an immediate contributor on your sales team. Resist the temptation to overlook serious gaps with the hope energy and effort will prevail.

Get it

Successful, growing businesses are unique. Their best employees “get it,” embracing that uniqueness. Short of a hostile or illegal environment, each employer still has the right to select people who “get” their uniqueness and their customers. A tech start up has a very different “it” than a drywall contractor. Know the “it” and hire people who get “it.”

Developing People
Your best people want development, on the job experiences, rotations and new assignments. The best employees deserve mentoring and coaching.
Training is another great way to introduce new skills.  The point is, development is important for employers to get the most from employees but is also an important retention tool. Good people leave workplaces that offer no growth.

Keep the Best

Great people quit for many reasons, both preventable and unavoidable. Managers are surprised to learn these reasons:

  1. Unrealistic pre-hire expectations
  2. People will exchange some pay for some flexibility, but it must be real flexibility
  3. Employees who feel ignored by their manager may look elsewhere

Stop allowing the economy to guide your commitment to talent acquisition and retention. Grab the reins!

Your Top Performers Can Help Attract Good Talent

Tuesday, April 12th, 2016

The recruiting process is, in some ways, very similar to the sales process. In the recruiting sense, the product you are selling to the candidate is your organization and what it can do for them and their career.  As with any sale, you want to position your product in the best possible light, showing key differentiators between your product and your competition.

In an extremely competitive market, like North Carolina, there is an overwhelming array of features and options that can be mixed-and-matched with any product sale togoldfish further confuse the buyer (or candidate).  When faced with so many choices, we often turn to others to see what their experience has been.  This is where your top performers come in!

What is it about your organization that motivates your top performers to give 110% each day?  Why did they choose to “buy” your product, and why do they continue to remain a loyal “customer” today?  The answers to these questions will help you to better position your product against your competition during the recruiting process. Below are a few items that typically motivate top performers.  Your current employees will be able to provide you with what specifically motivates them each day.

  • Compensation – No doubt a paycheck is a strong motivator.  However, the total rewards package also includes other benefits and non-tangible perks such as workplace flexibility.
  • Values – Adoption of a positive corporate culture is one of the most powerful  intangible benefits of working for an organization.  If a company shows a corporate responsibility toward the environment, for example, candidates will appreciate that. Or, if an organization practices charity and giving back to the community, their corporate culture is viewed by many as philanthropic.  These ideals are big attractors for candidates who have similar values.
  • Quality – Product quality and support of the customer base is a big motivator.  It goes back to treating people the way you want to be treated.  An organization that cares about its brand will likely care about its employees in the same manner.
  • Goals – Everyone has goals.  They may be long-range goals, or shorter-range goals which are “stepping stones” to a larger goal.  In either case, when an employee or candidate’s goals are aligned with those of the organization, it is a win-win for everyone.
  • Innovation – Knowing that your organization is open to new ideas and willing to listen to your thoughts on a new product or process can go a long way toward attracting and retaining top performers. Companies that embrace their employees as individual contributors and value their input will have no trouble selling their “product” to potential candidates.

As Human Resource managers, knowing what motivates your top employees today will give you the references you need to convince your candidates to “buy” from you instead of your competitors.  Reach out to your top performers and involve them in the recruiting process.  Ask them what would be important to them if they were interviewing with your company today.  Have them spend a few minutes alone with a candidate to talk freely about why they choose to work here.  If you’re recruiting college graduates, take your stars with you during campus recruiting trips.  We have one member that takes newly hired engineers on college recruiting trips.  They tell potential recruits about all the cool projects they get to work on (whereas in many companies new engineers do grunt work).  This practice alone has helped the company become a destination place for top engineers.  There is nothing more convincing than a solid reference from someone who consistently uses your “product” on a daily basis.

And remember, as Jill Feldman, CAI’s HR ON Demand consultant states, “recruiting and hiring is NOT the sole responsibility of Human Resources. Anyone who has people reporting to them is responsible for recruiting and hiring.  Don’t be afraid to get others involved in the process.

How to Create and Sustain a More Diverse Workforce

Thursday, March 31st, 2016


In today’s post, CAI’s HR Manager Melissa Short and Marketing Intern Andy Bradshaw discuss the strategies HR professionals should take in order to foster a diverse and inclusive organizational culture.

In 2013, Harvard Business Review conducted a survey of 1800 professionals that found a striking correlation between diversity and innovation in the workplace. The study examined what it terms “two-dimensional diversity”- which encompasses both inherent diversity, or traits you are born with such as gender and ethnicity, as well as acquired diversity, involving traits you gain from experience. The study referred to companies whose leaders exhibit at least three inherent and three acquired diversity traits as having two-dimensional diversity, and found that that companies with 2-D diversity out-innovate and out-perform others.

In fact, employees at these companies are 45% likelier to report that their firm’s market share grew over the previous year and 70% likelier to report that the firm captured a new market.

Though it may sound intuitive, the evidence for the business case for workplace diversity is significant. Along with carrying the obvious social value of creating a more inclusive, tolerant workplace, diversity in the office really can improve profits and your bottom line, as evidenced above.

Of course, most HR professionals don’t need to be told that diversity is important to the workplace, as they are most likely aware of its many benefits. Where many in HR may struggle with the process, however, is how to get started on tackling diversity initiatives with limited time and money. That’s where we’re here to help. By dividing the process into these easily digestible phases, you’ll not only be able to quickly lay the groundwork for a more diverse workplace, but also put your office on a path to sustaining this diversity going forward.

Selection and Hiring

To create a truly diverse workplace, you have to start at the beginning. Hiring people with different backgrounds may be an obvious way to improve diversity, but it takes a conscious effort to broaden recruiting efforts to reach those candidates. Here are a few ideas as to where to start this process:

  • Think about where you look for candidates. Are you looking in markets or roles that seek out membership associations, clubs, and publications with minority or underrepresented community audiences? Right here in the Triangle, you could be looking at reaching out to minority publications such as Que Pasa and The Triangle Tribune in order to place job postings.
  • But go beyond just posting a job to engaging and networking with the owners and employees in order to build longer term-genuine relationships.
  • Train and educate hiring managers on the importance of organizational diversity, particularly the business benefits. By ensuring the hiring team is aware of both the social and financial need for diversity in the office, HR can lead the charge to finding more qualified and diverse minority candidates.

Enhancing Organizational Inclusion

Once you’ve moved past the selection and hiring of a diverse pool of candidates, how will you ensure they want to stay at your organization? It takes a company-wide commitment to cultivate a culture of organizational inclusion. Employees want to work in an environment where they feel supported and valued for their differences and Human Resources plays a large role in driving this culture. Here’s how HR can permeate inclusion throughout their organization’s culture:

  • Go beyond handbook policies that cover anti-discrimination laws and consider including an organizational statement that addresses the company’s commitment to an environment of support and inclusion.
  • Revisit your dress guidelines to ensure that you aren’t inadvertently excluding items that are cultural or religious in nature.
  • Demonstrate a company commitment to utilizing minority-owned or managed businesses for key vendor relationships.
  • Regularly review your pay system to identify and correct any pay inequities.

Sustaining diversity going forward

Now that you’ve planted the seeds of diversity within your organization, HR must do its part to ensure it continues to grow and prosper moving forward. Creating a diverse workplace is one thing, but what about keeping it that way? Here are a few tips to ensure your diverse workplace is here to stay:

  • Ensure your minority employees have equal access to opportunities through the use of a minority mentorship program. This will not only give minority employees a space for engagement and advancement but also breaks down barriers between generations and other boundaries at work
  • Train managers and all employees on cultural awareness and inclusion – this can be as simple as an online training course or even sharing an article or case study around this subject.
  • Educate your front line managers around the business and social benefits of diversity and teach them to recognize any signs that point otherwise.
  • Be transparent around your intent to create and sustain a diverse and inclusive work environment and the company practices that support it. By openly showcasing your organization’s commitment to diversity and inclusion, you will continue to create a culture that fosters these ideals and attract employees who are dedicated to fulfilling them.

Though the process may seem overwhelming, it is imperative that HR leads the charge for a more diverse and inclusive workplace. By following these phases, you can foster a sense of inclusion that will transform your business for the better, both culturally and financially. For any other helpful tips about how to create a more diverse workplace, please let us know in the comments!