Posts Tagged ‘engage’

Are You a Micromanager or a Macromanager?

Thursday, September 24th, 2015
Renee' Watkins, HR Advisor

Renee’ Watkins, HR Advisor

In today’s post, Advice and Resolution team member Renee’ Watkins shares some tips for adopting a Macromanaging mindset when overseeing employees. 

Are you a Micromanager?  Do others consider you to be?  Hopefully, the answer to both of these questions is “No.”  The term Micromanager is widely thought to be one of the most unflattering labels you can have if you manage people.  Micromanagers typically involve themselves so deeply into the smallest details of every project they manage it actually inhibits productivity and creates a very unpleasant workplace for the team as a whole.

Granted, not being a Micromanager is better than being a Micromanager.  But is there something even better?  Yes!  A Macromanager.

Macromanagers deal with employees more efficiently, taking advantage of their individuality and contributing strengths to the overall team.  Macromanagers provide a work environment which allows a team to work together and empowers them to not only make decisions, but to also make mistakes and to learn from both.  This creates a bi-directional feeling of trust, while maintaining a sense of employee engagement and generating results.

How can you become a Macromanager?  How can you make the transition all the way from Micromanager to Macromanager?  Try implementing these four traits of a Macromanager:

Focus on The Big Picture – Micromanagers get too deep in the weeds of a project rather than looking at things from a 10,000-foot viewpoint.  To be a good Macromanager, focus more of your energy and attention on the organization’s direction and strategy for the future.  In doing so, you can develop creative ideas on how to get there and trust your team to use their collective strengths to work out the details for success.

Understand Your Audience – Micromanagers tend to micromanage everyone, even those who do not need it. Macromanagers may occasionally need to provide more detailed guidance to a team member who is less experienced. When you see that team member begin to “get it,” step back before entering “Micromanager Mode.”  Have a stronger member of your team work with and mentor the less experienced employees.

Observe – Watch the progress of your team, keeping your distance.  As an experienced manager, you will recognize the cues that tell you when to engage and when to hold back.  Your responsibility is the successful completion of the project overall, so you should always be involved as a manager, mentor, advisor and member of the team.  Successful people surround themselves with successful people.  Give your team room to succeed and let them know you are there if they need you.

Welcome Feedback – Find a way to ask questions regarding progress without coming across as “interfering.”  As the manager responsible for overall success, you have the right and the responsibility to know what is going on.  Make sure your team understands you are not there to judge or to criticize, but to offer help and observations if and when needed. Open communication should be encouraged.

As a manager, you have larger responsibilities to the organization.  If you ever find yourself getting too deep into the weeds of any one project, you should ask yourself, “What should I be doing in my job that I am not doing?”  Chances are there is something else you should be focusing more time on.  Your employees will thrive and progress more quickly with your guidance rather than your direct involvement.

If you have any more questions regarding the importance of macromanagement, please contact a member of CAI’s Advice and Resolution team at 919‑878‑9222 or 336‑668‑7746.

 

How to Keep Your Employees Excited About Coming to Work

Tuesday, September 15th, 2015

In today’s post, Advice and Resolution team member Renee’ Watkins shares some helpful tips to keep your workforce engaged!

Renee' Watkins, HR Advisor

Renee’ Watkins, HR Advisor

Actions often speak louder than words, and the simplest, unexpected and sincerest actions at the proper moment can make a significant difference in someone’s day.  Everyone appreciates being recognized in a tangible way with additional compensation or a certificate of appreciation for a job well done.  Studies have shown, however, employees equally appreciate a heartfelt “Good Morning” from a manager to make their day more pleasant.  Here are a few other simple things to get your employee excited about their job and the organization they are a part of:

 

  • A Pleasant Beginning – employee attitudes throughout the day are influenced with how their day starts. Something as simple as “good morning” or a smile from a supervisor can set the tone for the rest of the day.

 

  • Take An Interest – take an interest in their lives, acknowledging a sick relative or a graduating son or daughter. Employees are people first, before employees.

 

  • Pay Special Attention – recognize your employees for doing a good job and offer to help them grow. Likewise, be candid with your employees when they are not measuring up and offer to help them improve.

 

  • Show Flexibility – offer a work shift change or additional time off to an employee who is dealing with a temporary change in their personal life to give them time to adjust.

 

  • Demonstrate Consideration – start a meeting later if an employee is running late to work due to traffic or a sick child. Consider your own feelings if the situation were reversed. Respect given is respect gained.

 

  • Sensitivity Matters – help employees who need a change at their workstation to be more comfortable. A change in office climate or a new chair can show how much you notice their environment and how much you care.

 

  • Be A Part of the Team – show up to employee group functions such as group lunches, birthday celebrations or after-hours gatherings to which you are invited to attend. Supervising the team includes being a part of the team.

 

  • Keep Your Perspective – do not take your stress out on your employees. Put things in perspective, take a deep breath and smile. If you remain at ease, they will remain at ease also.

 

  • Open Your Door – maintain an open door for your employees to come to you with a problem or idea. Listen intently, and offer a solution or advice if you can. If you cannot help, show appreciation for their coming to you. If they have a good idea, help them to move it forward.

 

  • Say Thank You – thank your team members as often as you can for the job they do. Expressing your appreciation will lift your team to new heights, and success will follow.

 

If you have questions regarding employee engagement, please contact a member of CAI’s Advice and Resolution team at 919‑878‑9222 or 336‑668‑7746.