Posts Tagged ‘employment law’

New Legislation Activity Will Affect NC Employers

Tuesday, April 14th, 2015

George Ports, CAI’s Senior Executive and HR Advisor shares important legislation updates for NC employers in today’s post.

George Ports, Senior Executive and HR Advisor

George Ports, Senior Executive and HR Advisor

The 2015 Session of the North Carolina General Assembly officially convened on January 28, 2015.  As we expected, there has been a lot of activity pertaining to legislation introduced affecting day-to-day workplace issues, legislation that I will be covering at CAI’s 2015 Employment and Labor Law Update in May.

Bills introduced in the House and in the Senate aim to make changes to North Carolina’s unemployment laws.  Some of these changes such as requiring a photo ID to receive benefits, requiring more weekly attempts by claimants to obtain employment and authorizing the NCDMV to release social security numbers to the NCDES to prevent fraud were contained in legislation passed in the 2014 Session but vetoed by Governor McCrory.

Other legislation addresses criminal record expunction laws, one bill places restrictions on credit history checks for applicants, and another provides NC Industrial Commission fraud investigators more authority (investigators would be sworn law enforce officers with arrest powers).  Oh yes, and there is a bill that attempts to revise North Carolina’s E-verify law, increasing the number of employers required to use e-verify (employers from 25 or more employees to employers with 5 or more employees).

For many years “employee misclassification” has been a Hot Button for USDOL’s Wage & Hour Division—is the individual providing services to an employer an employee or an independent contractor?  This misclassification issue has garnered quite a bit of attention from North Carolina regulatory agencies and legislators.  Employers don’t pay payroll taxes or unemployment taxes on independent contractors nor are independent contractors covered by employers’ workers compensation insurance.  Independent contractors therefore are not eligible for unemployment or workers’ compensation benefits.

As this article is being written, there are at least four bills that have been introduced in attempts to address “employee misclassification.”  All four have their own definitions of employee and independent contractor.  Two bills are similar in their definitions and that they allow employers a “second bite of the apple” before penalties are imposed.  There is one bill’s definition of an independent contractor, however, it is quite narrow and its penalties for misclassifying an employee as an independent contractor are severe.  Civil penalties can range from $500 to $4000 per violation.  The amount of the penalty will be determined by “the size of the business of the person charged and the gravity of the violation”.  This legislation also contains a provision giving regulatory agencies the authority to issue a stop work order, in other words, shut down business operations. 

During my presentation, I’ll be giving status updates on each bill, stating whether they’ve passed and providing insights as to the probability of them passing or not.  We at CAI look forward to hosting our annual Employment and Labor Law Update on May 14th and 15th at the McKimmon Center in Raleigh.

The Employers Coalition of North Carolina (ECNC) was created to give the business community a more focused avenue of public policy input concerning day to day employer-employee workplace issues. ECNC is a partnership of three North Carolina employers’ associations: CAI (Capital Associated Industries), TEA (The Employers Association) and WCI (Western Carolina Industries) and their 2500 members.

Are You Making Costly Compliance Mistakes?

Thursday, March 19th, 2015

Business meetingNot knowing the different federal and state employment laws is not an excuse for not following them. Making sure you are in compliance can be overwhelming as several regulations and laws get amended or updated each year. Trying to keep up with all of the information may be time consuming or frustrating, but staying informed is necessary for keeping you and your organization protected.

Based on the EEOC’s 2014 Charge Receipt, employers all over the country lost nearly 300 million dollars for not staying compliant with employment law in that year. Don’t let this happen to your organization. Government enforcement agencies like the EEOC are always looking for ways to improve their methods for finding employers that are not following the law—whether purposefully or unknowingly.

Follow these three steps to help you stay on top of any federal or state law changes:

  • Research, research, research

Research is essential for making sure you understand the responsibilities you have to your employees and the business community. Some helpful websites to make sure you’re getting the information you need include: http://www.eeoc.gov/, http://www.dol.gov/, and http://www.nclabor.com/.

  • Attend an employment law conference or web series

Let’s face it—we are not capable of doing it all or knowing it all. Finding information on your own through internet searching or government agency announcements is important and should be part of every employer’s quest to stay compliant. Attending an employment law conference or joining a web series on the topic with industry experts, such as employment law attorneys, ensures that you get a deeper dive and a broader base of knowledge to keep your company protected.

  • Form a community

Make sure to stay in touch with your industry peers. The community support you can receive will be helpful for you when you need assistance in making a policy decision or handling a difficult employee situation. Whether they are coworkers on your team or members of a local industry group you meet up with monthly, it’s important for you all to discuss the different issues and laws that currently and will eventually affect employers.

Knowledge is your strongest defense against the complicated, ever changing world of federal and state employment law. Don’t risk your company’s reputation or having to pay attorney fees because you were unaware of the information you needed to keep your company safe and protected.

Guarantee that your company stays on track in 2015 and beyond by joining us for our 2015 Employment and Labor Law Update on May 13 and May 14 at the McKimmon Center in Raleigh. You will learn everything you need to know regarding updates to state and federal employment law. Some of the conference topics include: the NLRB, the Affordable Care Act, undue hardships and the ADA, sexual harassment, data security, FMLA and more!

Are You Aware of the Regulatory and Legal Changes Affecting N.C. Employers in 2013?

Thursday, March 21st, 2013

2013ELLU-Flash 2012 brought a number of federal and state employment law changes that will affect North Carolina employers this year. Agencies, such as the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) and the U.S. Department of Labor (USDOL), are giving employers more challenges by increasing their scrutiny on compliance. North Carolina also has restructured its unemployment insurance system to deal with the state’s federal debt, as well as make the NC Division of Employment Security (DES) more efficient.

Please join us for the 2013 Employment and Labor Law Update at Raleigh’s McKimmon Center on May 22 and May 23. The experienced attorneys of Ogletree Deakins will update you on the latest developments and inform you on what they mean to N.C. employers and how they will specifically affect your organization.

Ogletree Deakins’ knowledgeable attorneys will cover several topics pertinent to employers, including:

 

NLRB

Workplace Violence Prevention

Employee Handbooks

N.C. Legislature

ICE

E-Verify

Healthcare Reform

ADAAA

Challenges with New Technology

Compensation Systems

USDOL

FLSA

Unemployment Insurance Reform

Affordable Care Act

EEOC

Whistleblower Claims

 

Brian Hayes, former NLRB member and voice of management on the board for more than two years, will present at this year’s conference. Brian’s term on the NLRB Board may have ended in December 2012, but he’ll share his view on the board’s recent rulings and help you prepare for the new challenges facing employers. Conference favorite Dennis Davis also will share with attendees a special presentation on preventing workplace violence.

If you want to understand how the latest developments in state and federal employment laws and regulations affect your organization, attend this conference. In addition to all the compliance information you’ll receive, you’ll have a number of opportunities to network with leading employment law attorneys and more than 350 HR executives and company leaders.

Please visit www.capital.org/lawupdate to review the event’s full agenda, descriptions about the presentations and to register. Feel free to call 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746 with any questions.