Posts Tagged ‘employee relationships’

Address These 4 Employee Needs for Maximum Retention

Tuesday, June 20th, 2017

Recruiting top employees involves a relevant understanding of what attracts candidates to an opportunity; what do they want, and what are their priorities.  Once you have them on board, how do you retain them?  The needs and priorities of an employee can be different than those of a candidate.

In addition to the usual priorities like compensation, benefits and a flexible work schedule, most employees have four (4) basic needs to be happy and engaged in the workplace.  Those four needs are:  Caring, Respect, Appreciation, and Praise.

CaringMost people can tell if you genuinely care about them or not.  Something in your voice, the way you address them, or even your body language can tip them off.  Sincerity is difficult to fake and insincerity is difficult to hide.  Employees need to know their management cares about them for more than just what they bring to the business each day.  Be sure they know your door is always open.  Make certain you are responsive by setting aside sufficient time to understand their concern and to try and help address it.  Remember, for them, coming to you is a big step.  If you seem at all as if you do not care, or that you do not have time for them, they may not come to you again.

Respect – Everyone wants respect.  Respect for what they do and respect for how they do it.  One of the quickest ways to demonstrate a lack of respect for your employee is to micromanage.  Micromanaging suggests a lack of trust in your employee’s ability to get the job done.  On the other hand, one of the best ways to demonstrate respect for your employee is to allow them to grow to their full potential.  Offer your leadership and mentoring to help them succeed.  Provide training for employees who demonstrate initiative and show true promise for advancement.

Appreciation – Showing your appreciation for an employee’s results and work ethic is not difficult, and it does not have to be expensive.  We sometimes focus far too much and far too often on the negative, and not enough on the positive.  A simple “Thank You” can go a long way.  A pair of movie coupons or recognition in front of peers is a great way to show your appreciation.  Without appreciation, an employee may feel beaten and defeated.  They will eventually come to believe they can do nothing right, and will not want to come to work.

Praise – This is really just “appreciation” kicked up a notch or two.  It is always nice to feel appreciated, but to receive praise is an entirely different feeling.  Praise is larger, and therefore should be reserved for recognition of an employee going above and beyond their everyday job function.  An innovative idea, a new time-saving process, or productivity metrics well over 100% are just a few reasons to award special praise over simple appreciation.  Praise for employee who exceeds their expectations can also serve to incent other team members to “step up their game” in order to receive similar recognition.

This all sounds very simple, but in fact it takes time and thought.  These are very deliberate actions on the part of leaders, and time must be built into the day to accomplish even two or three of these for at least one or two individuals.  Over time, Caring, Respect, Appreciation and Praise will begin to filter across the workforce and you will have employees who not only trust you, but are loyal to you and your organization as well. Employees will feed off of the positive culture and demonstrate care, respect, appreciation and praise for co-workers.

CAI’s Advice & Resolution Advisor Renee Watkins is a seasoned HR professional with a diverse background in Human Resource. Renee provides CAI members with practical advice in a wide range of human resource functions including conflict resolution, compliance and regulatory issues, and employee relations.

New Rules About the Manager-Employee Relationship

Tuesday, June 6th, 2017

Once upon a time, there were “rules” about a professional reporting relationship.  The manager was clearly the authority and was to be revered by the employee.  Often, the manager was older than the employee and the assumption was that he or she possessed greater wisdom.  Therefore, the employee was obliged to listen and generally heed that wisdom.  A clear delineation of power existed between the two and everyone recognized that the manager was to be held in high regard and treated with deference by the employee. Both parties understood that becoming too familiar with the other was not in his or her best interest when it came to success in the workplace.  Managers were discouraged from socializing with their charges outside of work and in all cases, the employee was expected to take a subordinate role to his or her “superior”.

Fast forward to today.  In many organizations, a far more egalitarian approach exists. Managers serve more as coaches, facilitators and partners. For one thing, they are no longer the sole guardians of information that formerly gave them so much power.  With technology changes, nearly everyone can get vital information at the touch of a keystroke.  Management is no longer reserved for those with seniority, and workers of any age may rise to positions of authority due to their technical prowess, their ability to relate to others and their leadership qualities.  So, in many environments, one person may carry the title of manager, but the employee is considered more of a colleague than a direct report.

So, what is the “etiquette” of the reporting relationship today?  The manager has many responsibilities; among them the obligation to share information, encourage and support growth, and to hold employees accountable for their work.  The employee is expected to learn as well as to teach, to take responsibility for their work and to share ideas and concerns with their manager.  Both parties are expected to treat one another with dignity and respect.

Can a manager and an employee also share a personal friendship outside of work?  The question is more “How do I differentiate between friend and boss?”  And what do I need to do to avoid the perception of favoritism?  Some guidelines include:

  • Having a conversation with employees to let them know that at work, your responsibility includes assessing their professional performance.  Providing feedback is part of your job as a manager and your intent is to support them to do their very best.
  • Having a conversation with the team to let them know your clear expectations and how they can contribute to the team’s success.
  • Holding regular one-to-one meetings with employees to discuss their progress and to find out how you as the manager can help them achieve their goals while continuing to do the work of the organization

CAI offers hundreds of training courses and programs to improve the skills and performance of managers, supervisors, professionals and HR. Classroom training is offered in Raleigh, Greensboro and Greenville. If you prefer remote access, visit e-learning. Find out more here about why you should choose CAI to optimize your employees’ potential.

Blog post by: CAI’s Linda Taylor, Learning & Development Partner

Photo credit: Office Space, Twentieth Century Fox

Have You Evaluated Your Workplace Attitude?

Tuesday, November 20th, 2012

How you come across at work has a pretty powerful influence on your organization whether or not you realize it. They people you interact with, especially staff members you work with regularly, are affected by the way you treat them, including your responses to their questions, the feedback you give them and empathy you show towards them.

Being callous, miserable or self-centered won’t help your popularity around the office and will likely damage your professional reputation. No one wants to work with the office grump, whiner, gossiper, complainer—the list goes on. Don’t let a negative trait you might have completely define your office persona.

Try to incorporate these four tips into your workday to have a more positive influence on your organization:

Be Polite

Choosing to use words like “please” and “thank you” will improve your workplace reputation. Giving your coworkers respect, whether it’s with their time, ideas or feelings, will help you win the same treatment from them. Be nice when you can and try to always help an employee who is truly in need.

Think on it

People have a tendency to talk before they think. With today’s technological advances, talking before you think turns into emailing, tweeting, calling or blogging.  If an employee has made you upset or folks didn’t want to use your idea for a project, don’t retaliate by immediately firing off a response to their actions. Because of your emotions, you might not realize the tone you’re conveying. Think your thoughts through and how your words will affect the receiver and your place at the company.

Ask for Help

Asking for assistance from colleagues is a simple and expected workplace occurrence. Unfortunately, some employees would rather miss their deadlines, give poor excuses or blame others before admitting that they can’t do everything by themselves. Complete your work, and if you need extra assistance for a project, swallow your pride and ask. If employees are constantly seeking assistance, they should talk to their managers about adjusting their workload.

Recognize Effort

Improve your workplace relationships by recognizing the contributions each one of your team members makes to the organization. Appreciate the effort and time your employees spend delivering results for your company. By acknowledging their hard work, you will likely gain their trust and commitment to keep up their great job performance.

For more tips to improve your workday and on-the-job performance, please contact a member of CAI’s Advice and Counsel Team at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746.

Photo Source: sektordua