Posts Tagged ‘employee feedback’

Employees Will Seek Consistent Feedback in the New Year

Tuesday, January 15th, 2013

employee feedbackGeneration Y is not the only workforce population that relies on frequent feedback to improve their workplace performance.  Each of your workers will benefit from a meeting discussing their current performance and how they’ll fare in future.

Telling your employees how their performance measures up is advantageous to your organization and their career. Maybe you don’t understand what motivates your office manager or that your graphic designer needs an assistant to better manage his workload. Consistently offering staffers feedback and asking them how you can help will explain some of the questions you haven’t thought to ask.

Here are five ways to offer feedback to your workers and improve their job performance:

Notice Their Routine

Be aware of how your employees conduct themselves at your organization. As their manager, you’re responsible for making sure they deliver the results that you hired them to achieve. Your direct reports represent you and your department, so protect your reputation by playing an active role in their development.

Listen to Their Concerns

Part of being a manager or a leader is addressing the concerns of your employees. The only way you’ll find out their concerns is if you ask them questions and listen. Holding individual, weekly or monthly meetings with your team members is a great way to uncover their motivators and the personal goals they’d like to reach.

Offer Encouragement

Listening is just the start of establishing a positive manager/direct report relationship. Once you know what your employees are hoping to achieve, inform them that you’re on their side. Make yourself available to your employees if they need help. Walk them through frustrating situations, and don’t let them quit, even when obstacles become overwhelming.

State the Truth

Be direct with your employees because it will help them and your business in the long run. Sugar coating issues will only prolong the problems at hand. Take action to make your staff members aware that you have concerns about some aspects of their job performance. Work with them to find solutions instead of wasting time.

Recognize Their Work

Anytime your employees execute great work performances, you should take time to recognize them. Whether they prepared well for a presentation, assisted a colleague who was home sick or doubled their sales numbers, rewarding them for their hard work lets them know that you appreciate their contributions. Showing employees that they are integral team members will boost their morale and level of engagement.

For additional information on delivering constant feedback, please call a member of CAI’s Advice and Counsel Team at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746.

Photo Source: RDECOM

A Tale of Two Cultures

Tuesday, August 7th, 2012

The post below is a guest post from Buzz Rooney, a practicing HR professional with more than 10 years of experience in the production, manufacturing and retail industries. She currently works for a large retail franchise handling employee relations, health benefits, compliance and more. Read more of her writings, connect and contact her through her website, The Buzz on HR.

Company A had a very strong culture. When you entered their offices, you could feel the positivity exuding from every cubicle. It was clear that people loved working there and that the company worked hard to make the employees feel valued. The office was brightly decorated, the equipment was state-of-the-art, and the break area was stocked with yummy snacks and fun games. The employees always spoke of the company as “us” and “we.” They could recite the history of the organization. They knew how their work connected to the work of others and how it impacted the bottom line of the organization.

Their pride in their practices made them cocky. Over time, the organization began to think their way was the only way to do business. They criticized and ridiculed organizations that weren’t like them – including clients and vendors.

Company B also had a very strong culture. When you entered their offices, you could feel the negativity exuding from every cubicle. It was clear that people resented working there and didn’t feel valued. The office walls were dingy white and undecorated, the equipment was older, and the break area was tiny and full of not-so-gentle reminders (don’t leave dirty dishes in the sink; don’t take people’s stuff out the fridge, etc).  The employees spoke of the company as “they” and “them.” No one knew the history of the organization. They didn’t know how their work connected to the work of others or impacted the bottom line organization.

Their acrimonious attitude made them tense and guarded. Employees were constantly fearful of losing favor with decision-makers. Bullying and passive-aggressive behavior abounded. Every change was met with resistance, reluctance and reticence. When asked to define the culture of their organization, everyone from the owner to the receptionist said “We don’t really have one.”

Wrong! Every organization has culture. It might be a cult or it might be a crock – but it exists and is always there.

Culture is what your employee’s think, feel and express about working there. Most companies actively work to define their culture. Others let it develop organically.

How can you figure out and fix the culture of your organization?

Ask. Employees generally want to give feedback. They want to tell management how they are feeling. Give them the opportunity to do it without fear of retaliation. Also ask your customers and vendors about their experiences working with the employees of your organization and their perceptions of your culture.

Assess. Once you have the feedback from your customers, employees and vendors, examine it against the mission, vision, values, goals, policies and procedures against the organization. See if the feedback matches. Where it doesn’t match up, determine the cause. Watch for patterns and common threads, such as employees from one area being more or less happy than others. Stay open and willing to embrace the feedback, especially the hard truths.

Adjust. Now that you have the information, it’s time to do something with it. That starts by deciding if you are OK with the feedback received. If the organization does not disagree or isn’t disturbed by the perceptions, there is no need to do anything. However, this isn’t usually the case. More often, organizations are horrified to learn what everyone thinks about them. You have to own the shortcomings in your organization that created those perceptions. Then you have to address the issues at every level. For awhile, all of your decisions and business actions will have to be scrutinized for culture alignment. Eventually, if you don’t give up, the culture you want will take root, blossom and grow.

Culture manifests itself either positively or negatively in the effort and attitude of the employees. Regardless of how it develops, we must know what the culture is – and take the steps to change it when it is not what we want it to be.

Photo Source: Victor1558

Goal Setting is Critical for Employee Engagement and Company Success

Thursday, December 29th, 2011

Tuesday’s post featured information for conducting productive employee performance reviews. In addition to the four key elements listed in that post, employee goal setting is another important part of the review process. Goal setting is helpful for managers and employees. Managers have multiple opportunities to provide employees with feedback during this process, and they are able to identify their employees’ strengths and weaknesses. Employees can see how their individual contributions affect and support their company’s bottom line when they begin making goals. If goal setting is done correctly, managers have measurable results to verify that employees met or did not meet their assigned goals, which is helpful when determining rewards and future career paths.

Appropriate goal setting can motivate employees to produce stellar work. Managers should help their direct reports create suitable goals for their positions. Assisting workers with goal setting keeps managers informed about the personal and professional interests their workers have.

 Successful companies have their employees set goals frequently—quarterly, monthly or even weekly—not just once a year. Here are a few tips to help goal setting run smoothly:

 

1. Know What You Want Accomplished

Employee goals should align with company goals. Managers should inform their staffs that their roles are essential for bringing the company success, and they should help their staffs tailor goals that will bring additional success.

Managers may have several goals that they would like their employees to accomplish, but they also need to consider the goals their employees would like to attain. Simply ask employees what they would like to achieve, and if their objectives are appropriate, help them create action plans. Employees are more likely to be engaged in their work when they see how their efforts benefit them and their company.

Sometimes managers and employees are overzealous with the amount of goals they create for themselves. All goals should support the overall company mission, so strive for quality instead of quantity when establishing them.

2. Can They Reach Them?

Unrealistic goals benefit no one. In order for employees to be happy at their workplace and produce good work for their employers, they need to receive fairness with demands and expectations. Goals that are too high or impossible to reach will leave employees feeling helpless. Keep their morale high and stress low by tailoring goals to their skill set, position and career growth. Goals should be both challenging and attainable.

When employees are satisfied with their specific goals, have them strategize ways to accomplish them. Break large goals into several projects and help employees set deadlines and determine adequate progress for each one.

3. Be Present

Goals are often unmet because of a lack of supervision from managers. This problem is easily avoidable if managers and employees agree to meet and discuss the progress of each goal frequently. Micromanaging is not necessary, but receiving consistent updates will help managers keep their employees on track, as well as help them identify and work through potential obstacles.

Managers should use update meetings to provide employees with constructive criticism and evaluate goal progress. During these meetings, managers also should take time to encourage and praise employees for their efforts. These meetings are helpful for forming stronger manager-employee relationships because of the constant exchange of feedback and shared desire to achieve great results.

 

Employees who consistently meet or exceed their goals should be rewarded because they are showing commitment to their work and their organization. Not offering rewards will result in employee frustration, which has the potential to decrease productivity and increase turnover.

If employees do not meet their marks, managers should schedule time to meet with them to discuss the reasons why they fell short. Employees have to take responsibility for their work. Managers can inform employees of their disappointment if goals were attainable. After acknowledging disappointment, managers should help employees rework their goals or brainstorm strategies to make them more achievable.

Please contact a member of CAI’s Advice and Counsel Team at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746 for additional tips on successful employee goal setting.

Photo Source: hanspoldoja, Miiish

Performance Appraisals – Eight Steps to a Better Process

Tuesday, January 25th, 2011

Performance appraisals have been in use for more than 50 years as a standardized method for evaluating an employee’s job performance.  Most performance appraisals are conducted annually, but if job performance isn’t evaluated throughout the year as it happens, employers miss the opportunity to get the most productivity and best quality efforts from their employees.

Avoid common errors during employee performance appraisals.Below are eight steps to a better performance appraisal process.

#1 – Make Performance Appraisals an Ongoing Process

Employee management is an everyday process.  Rather than wait for an annual performance review, managers should provide both constructive criticism and praise to their employees throughout the year and use the annual performance appraisal to summarize the prior year’s performance.

#2 – Be Prepared

Forms and paperwork should be completed on time, and any solicited feedback from management and peers should be compiled and entered. Take the time to review the employee’s self-assessment prior to the appraisal meeting and be prepared to offer feedback.

#3 – Focus on the Entire Year

In summarizing the employee’s accomplishments throughout the prior year, try not to focus too much on only one or two events, or recent projects. Offer criticisms and praise that are general and that span the entire evaluation period.

#4 – Be Interactive

The performance appraisal must be interactive in order for the employee and the manager to arrive at the same conclusions at the end of the review. Employees may be nervous or apprehensive when entering a meeting about their performance, and the manager should strive to put them at ease.

#5 – Employees are Individuals

Employees should not be compared to other employees in their performance appraisal. Each employee must be evaluated according to his/her job description and performance in his/her job.

#6 – Solicit Feedback from Others

As a manager, you will want to request input from other managers, team members, and stakeholders with whom your employee interacts. The more information you have regarding how others in the organization view an employee, the better your position will be to help him/her be successful.

#7 – Performance Levels Dictate Merit Increase Levels

Giving two different employees very different performance appraisals and awarding them identical increases sends a message that performance does not matter.

#8 – Listen to Your Employees

The performance appraisal is an opportunity to provide feedback to an employee and also to gain valuable insight from the employee’s perspective. It is an important time to listen to your employees – one on one – and get their viewpoints on their performance and the organization as a whole.

For additional information on the performance appraisal process, contact a member of CAI’s Advice and Counsel team at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746.

Photo Source: Geograph