Posts Tagged ‘Employee Efficiency’

Improving and Maximizing Employee Efficiency

Tuesday, May 10th, 2011

Productivity is the name of the game. It is easy for employers to fall into the trap of believing that high levels of stress combined with a busy work life create the most effective results from employees, but that may not be the case. Employees are often just as effective without operating under high tension and hectic work/life schedules. Consider Fortune magazine’s list of “100 Best Companies To Work For” and you will see that a common thread spanning the majority of top organizations is the repetitive mention of high productivity and happy employees.

Shifting the workplace environment may be easier than you think. By adjusting your company mindset and assisting employees in becoming their most productive selves you promote a more efficient organization overall. Here are three ways to do that:

Make information fully accessible – Can your employees work easily from airports, hotel rooms and the home office? When completing assignments offsite runs as seamlessly as sitting in the company office, efficiency will inevitably increase. Employees may surprise you with the additional work they can complete outside the regular 8 to 5 routine when the proper systems are put in place for continuous access.

Become more flexible – Does last year’s model still fit the current staff and system of your company? Though structure is essential to the livelihood of an organization, your company’s working hours should occasionally be reevaluated. Early mornings, late evenings or longer work days – the level of productivity will improve when you identify the various ways your employees operate best.

Provide for employee needs – Have you evaluated the needs of your staff and if those needs are being met? Discuss with employees what they need to be more effective in their job, as they may vary from what you believe is best suited. Employee needs can be as small as a file folder for better organization or as large as dual monitors for completing assignments, but hear them out and consider the benefits as a whole.

For additional information on employee efficiency, please call a member of CAI’s Advice and Counsel team at (919) 878-9222 or (336) 668-7746.

Photo source: Hugo90

Key Qualities for Promotion to Management

Tuesday, March 29th, 2011

There are two types of employees – those who view their work as a job and those who view their work as a component of a long-term career. Both professional types can excel in performance, but for employees who are career motivated, operating as a subordinate is not enough.

For the employee seeking to climb the company ladder, it’s important to understand the qualities companies seek, and what can currently be done to assist in career advancement. Consider the following as you strive to claim your seat in management.

Showcasing your worth –The benefits of internal promotions are obvious to the individual – increased finances, added respect from company peers and a voice that carries a greater influence and reach, but how does the company benefit from your advancement? To join the management team, your value needs to be recognized. Whether it’s generating additional revenue, cutting cost or bringing new insight, the benefit needs to be clear.

Solid working habits – Members of the management team share common characteristics of dependability and decision-making. Can you do what you say you’re going to do, when you say you’re going to do it? In moments of challenge, when answers need to be received, can you call the shots? It’s the reliability that companies count on from management that results in success.

Level of efficiency – Companies value the employee who is time-oriented. Because the speed at which you operate is fundamental, form a habit of completing work in an efficient manner. Understand the difference between critical assignments and those that can be put on hold. A majority of CEOs agree that employees on track for advancement have a keen ability to establish priorities and sift through the essentials.

Teaching abilities – An essential quality of management is that the person’s level of expertise can be relayed and transferred to other employees. You can perform well, but to manage, you need to be able to teach, support staff, communicate information and share knowledge clearly for others to follow.

Avoid silence – You may be the best person to ever fill your job, but if no one knows about your achievements, how will your work ever be recognized? In the business world, it helps to occasionally “toot your own horn.” Give updates on your success to supervisors, find a mentor within the company that can spread your praises, but most importantly, make your voice heard.

A management role is not appropriate for all individuals. If you’d like to be a manager, make it a point to concentrate on your present performance. Those currently sitting at the table are continuously evaluating employees for when the team is ready for expansion. What you are doing right now will be the leading factor in the decision process six months down the road.

For additional information, please call a member of CAI’s Advice and Counsel team at (919) 878-9222 or (336) 668-7746.

Photo source: half-blood prince