Posts Tagged ‘Employee Benefits’

Shorter Work Days: Do they make sense for your business?

Thursday, March 30th, 2017

After a two-year government study on 6-hour work days that took place in Sweden, the results are in.  While employees proved to be happier, employer costs were higher.  Is the increase in cost worth it?

The study took place at the Svartedalens retirement home and was funded by the Swedish government. Employees went from 8-hour shifts to 6-hour shifts but were allowed to maintain their 8-hour salary.  Another similar facility participated as a control group by maintaining 8-hour shifts.  When compared, 68 nurses who worked 6-hour days took half as much sick time as those in the control group.  They were also 2.8 times as likely to take any time off in a two-week period.  In addition:

·       Employees reported higher energy levels and efficiency

·       Employees called in sick 15% less

·       Employees reported that their health improved 20%

·       Employees were 20% happier

·       Employees reported having more energy both at work and home

What about productivity?  Due to the increase in energy, the nurses working 6-hour days were able to do 64% more activities with the elders.  But although productivity increased, profitability decreased.  In order to allow the 80 nurses to work reduced hours, they had to hire 17 additional staff members.  Those new hires added $738,000 to payroll, which equates to a 22% increase.  They estimate that about half of that expense is offset by the reduction in sick time, time off, and unemployment.  While the experiment proved an increase in employee satisfaction and productivity, the added costs for additional staff need to be further analyzed.

Perhaps a 30-hour work week would be more successful in organizations where 24-hour coverage is not necessary.  There are several other experiments taking place in Sweden outside of the healthcare industry.  Final results are yet to come.  Brath, a Stockholm-based startup, has utilized 6-hour work days since its launch in 2012.  They argue that the shorter days have made them more successful than they might have been with 8-hour days due to an increased work-life balance.  “Our staff gets time to rest and do things that make them happier in life,” says CEO Marie Brath.  She also states, “Our work is a lot about problem solving and creativity, and we don’t think that can be done efficiently for more than six hours.  So we produce as much as – or maybe even more than – our competitors do in their 8-hour days.”

Although not the worldwide norm, France offers 35-hour work weeks.  In the U.S. work weeks average 47 hours.  However, several large U.S. companies have begun to experiment with reduced work weeks, such as Amazon.  Results remain to be seen.  Another U.S. company, SteelHouse began 2017 with an announcement that they will offer one 3-day weekend each month.  SteelHouse CEO Mark Douglas said that the next logical step after that will be going to regular 4-day work weeks.

A more common approach in the U.S. is a compressed work week, but with the same amount of hours.  For example, working 40 hours across four days.  According to a survey by Aon Hewitt, 30% of 1,060 employers surveyed offer a compressed work week.  60% of those surveyed offer flex time, which allows employees to set their own arrival and leave times.  This approach has been shown to be successful.  Research shows that when employees are allowed to have control over their work schedules they report lower levels of stress and burnout and report higher job satisfaction.

While 30-hour work weeks are not likely to become the norm anytime soon in the U.S., it does seem that flexibility in work hours will.  Be creative in your work week structure, and don’t be afraid to try new things.

Author: Heather Nezich, Manager of Communications American Society of Employers

Sources – inc.com, Bloomberg.com, businessinsider.com; fastcoexist.com

Unlimited PTO – Is It Right For Your Company?

Tuesday, March 14th, 2017

Business executives and HR professionals alike continue to explore ways to improve their organizations’ culture to drive both employee engagement and business results. One such way is by providing employees increased flexibility to improve the balance between their work life and personal life. The following information will provide key insights to help guide you in contemplating the very popular benefit of Unlimited PTO.  As your organization’s HR Business Partner you will want to be driving this conversation, not simply reacting to it.

What You Should Know about Unlimited PTO Plans

  • Unlimited PTO is a very popular topic these days.  But despite all its popularity only approximately 1% of U.S. companies* have an unlimited PTO plan in place.  This is clearly not a trend!
  • This 1% includes the likes of Netflix, GE, and LinkedIn. These are all well managed and results based businesses that compete aggressively for very targeted highly qualified and talented employees. These organizations also offer top tier compensation and benefits to their employees.  In consideration for these rewards, employees typically work very long days each week to achieve the desired results.
  • Culture First: Unlimited PTO works best in organizations’ cultures that values accountability, trust, and teamwork. An unlimited PTO plan, in and of itself, is not the catalyst that will seamlessly transition your organization to this state.  You must first build a culture of trust and accountability that will support the high degree of employee flexibility that an unlimited PTO plan requires – this is critical!  (Talent Management, July/August 2016)
  • Employees that are provided an unlimited PTO benefit typically do not take any more time off than in their prior traditional plan; in some cases, they are actually taking less time.
  • A 2013 time-off study conducted by Oxford Economics revealed that U.S. workers use on average 77% of their annual PTO accounts (or 16.2 of the 21 days allotted annually – leaving nearly 5 days on the table).
  • Although employers are not seeing a noticeable uptick in days off under the unlimited PTO approach, they are noticing that employees are altering how they are taking time off. For example, more employees are taking extended 4-day weekends. This is in part because families tend to be more spread out today and travel is required to attend family events. (Fortune,  March 2016)
  • Employees have a high degree of empowerment under unlimited PTO. However, these same employees also tend to be very diligent about their PTO decisions.  They want to perform high-quality work and they are also keenly aware their organization’s cultural norms (trust, accountability, teamwork etc.) and peer behaviors. These employees tend to make responsible choices that balance out business priorities and personal needs.  In many organizations however a collaborative discussion between employee and boss is required prior to the time off.

Tips for implementing an Effective Unlimited PTO Plan

  • Link your plan to your company’s culture and values. Your values will need to include: accountability, trust, and teamwork. As mentioned above, if your current culture is void these values, you will need to lead your business through a change initiative to lay this critical foundation.
  • Provide guidelines around how time-off requests get approved. Simple guidelines can help employees know when it is appropriate or not to request time off.  This is particularly helpful in the beginning stages of your roll-out.
  • Ensure your employees know that time off is a two-way street: employees receive increased time off flexibility and in return they perform at high a level ensuring their deliverables are completed on time. Further, they ensure that their teammates don’t feel abandoned during the employee’s time away from work.
  • Consider a pilot plan and be clear with your employees of your intent. Think this through thoroughly as rescinding an employee benefit, even a pilot program, can have adverse employee relations repercussions.
  • Consider naming your program something other than “Unlimited PTO.” “Personalized PTO” may be a viable alternative or other names that convey the overarching purpose of responsible employees making good decisions about their work and time off.
  • Drive Trust: shift your attention from the clock to contributions. Focus on your employees’ results and the success of the business – not how much time your employees are taking off.

Unlimited PTO plans are not for every company, in fact, they are not designed for many businesses in their current state. Transitioning to an unlimited PTO plan requires much thought, planning, and hard work to lay the proper foundation (culture) to effectively support this type of flexible plan. Does your current culture drive results through accountability, trust, and teamwork?

Whether an unlimited PTO plan is right for your business or not, this may be the time to review your total rewards plans as well as your culture. CAI’s Advice & Resolution team can help you think through these issues to discuss the best options for your company. Learn more about the advantages of becoming a CAI member.

Rick Washburn leads the Advice & Resolution team at CAI. In his role, he advises executives and HR professionals on strategic and organizational issues, tackling subjects ranging from employee engagement to talent management. With his 25 years experience in HR management, Rick is uniquely poised to advice and lead businesses to successful HR strategies

 

 

*Source: SHRM

HR’s Role in Helping Employees with Financial Literacy

Monday, January 2nd, 2017

Remember this movie from 2006? Looks like the “failure to launch” group is coming back around. According to recent data from Trulia*, nearly 40% of young adults lived with their parents, grandparents, step-parents and other relatives last year. This is the highest point in 75 years.

As Human Resource professionals, can we help reverse this trend? I believe we can, as many of us are starting to recognize the importance of financial literacy in the workplace. When employees manage their money well, everyone wins.

Financial literacy is the ability to use knowledge and skills to manage financial resources effectively for a lifetime of financial well-being. For many young professionals, they are not receiving a financial education. According to the National Council on Economic Education, only a handful of states requires students to complete a personal finance course in school.

That’s why work is becoming a place to provide education as employees experience life events: home purchases, retirement planning, family changes, and health changes. Using the workplace as a financial education classroom is a tremendous opportunity to increase productivity, engagement, and loyalty.

A report by the Personal Finance Employee Education Foundation clearly provides a business case for financial literacy programs in the workplace:

  • 30 million workers — one in four are suffering serious financial distress.
  • Nearly half of those who are financially distressed report that their health is negatively impacted by their financial worries.
  • 30% to 80% of financially distressed workers spend time at their place of employment worrying about personal finances and dealing with financial issues instead of working.

Employers have an opportunity and a responsibility to educate workers at all levels about financial literacy. The sooner an employee understands and applies the basic principles of financial literacy, the easier it is to achieve financial security.

There are several steps you can take to help employees become more financially literate. The first step is to put the right programs and systems in place. Becoming financially literate means understanding how to manage your income and expenses, handle debt responsibly, save and invest, and prepare for the unexpected. The more prepared employees are to adapt to changes in their financial lives, the more financially fit they will become.

Companies that implement financial literacy programs realize a return on their investment. While on the surface, this appears daunting to implement, employers have a strong incentive because of the strong correlation between financial stress and an employee’s productivity. Remember, most plan providers offer this service for free.

Financial literacy isn’t something that happens overnight. It takes time and effort. Making sure your employees get good information is the first step.

Tom Sheehan brings 20+ years of extensive, broad-based strategic, tactical and practical HR experience to CAI’s Advice & Resolution team.  He advises HR and other business leaders on talent management, organizational effectiveness, employee engagement, M&A’s, and employee relations.

 

Two Considerations For The Marketplace Open Enrollment Period

Tuesday, December 20th, 2016

The post below is a guest blog from Jay Lowe who serves as Principal, Health & Welfare Consultant for CAI’s employee benefits partner Hill, Chesson & Woody.

The Affordable Care Act provides the ability for individuals to buy coverage regardless of any underlying medical condition.  This guaranteed issue provision has provided millions of Americans the access to health care that was not there before.  Many who had access to group coverage have also shifted either themselves or dependents to individual plans when their group plans were too expensive or did not provide the coverage they needed.

This year’s annual Open Enrollment Period for the Marketplace has opened and we are seeing, on average, a 25% increase to the cost of individual plans.  This cost increase is forcing many who are enrolled there to re-evaluate if an individual plan is still the best option for them when other group coverage is available through an employer.  When making this decision around where to be covered, there are two important items that should be understood about moving onto or coming off of an employer-sponsored health plan.

First, the annual Open Enrollment Period for the Marketplace is not considered a qualifying event under the IRS guidelines to allow someone to drop their individual policy and enroll in an employer-sponsored group plan.  There seems to be a common misconception around this with both employers and employees.  As the costs for individual plans continue to rise, many are looking for ways to move back to an employer’s plan.  The only instance in which someone could leave their individual plan and move onto their employer’s group plan is if the group plan is in an open enrollment period.

Another thing to consider is that the Marketplace Open Enrollment Period is not a qualifying event that will allow someone to drop a spouse or dependent from their group plan (unless the group plan’s annual open enrollment period coincides.)  So those who may be considering moving a dependent to an individual plan would not have the ability to do so at that time.  However, a special provision in the rules does allow an employee the ability to make a mid-year revocation of their group plan (outside of the group’s open enrollment) and enroll in Marketplace coverage.  In order for an employee to move a spouse or dependent to an individual plan during the Marketplace Open Enrollment Period, the employee must also drop coverage for him or herself too.

Given the rising costs of individual plans it seems unlikely that many will want to shift away from the group coverage.  It is important for employers to know the rules around allowing employees to come on and off of their plans outside of their annual open enrollment period.  Employees should understand the potential pitfalls of shifting away their group plan as that could create the opposite impact of what they are trying to achieve.

Learning the Best Practices for Total Rewards in 2017

Thursday, September 22nd, 2016

Nearly 250 North Carolina HR professionals and executives attended CAI’s 2016 Compensation & Benefits Conference on September 15 and 16. Conference participants were eager to interact with one another and hear the latest on engaging and retaining top talent in this challenging economy.

Our three keynote speakers: Kerry Chou, of WorldatWork, Michael Patrick, of Willis Towers Watson’s Atlanta Talent & Rewards Practice, and CAI’s very own Molly Hegeman broke down ways to evaluate existing total rewards strategies using current trend information and insight from survey data. img_0076Employee engagement and success rate were a common trend shared by all speakers.

In Performance Management 101, Kerry Chou discussed the three questions an employer needs to ask themselves about an employee for the employee to be successful:

  • Is the employee CAPABLE of doing the job?
  • Does the employee have the TOOLS to do the job?
  • Does the employee PERFORM?

Michael Patrick stated only four in ten employees globally are highly engaged. In order to optimize employee engagement, employees need to be capable, have the tools and resources readily available to them and have the performance rate their employers want. “Know your Market Position,” Molly Hegeman, VP of HR Services at CAI stated, what is your philosophy? Are you going to be a market leader, match the market or lag behind? Molly suggests determining your market position by looking at the external and internal values.

In addition to the keynote sessions, conference participants chose from 9 breakout sessions from creating salary structures, managing costs related to the ACA, transforming performance management and using culture as a competitive advantage. Jay Burchfield from Teamphoria shared that companies with engaged employees outperform their competition by 202%, yet one negative employee with a bad attitude can affect four or more employees around them. Employers need to strive to make their employees feel excited about their work. Rebecca Bottorff, Bandwidth, stated, “We should be rewarding people more often.” Reward your employees with what matters to them – and that will vary from person to person. Companies should be conducting quarterly reviews, and providing employees with on-going feedback from their managers. This will help both the employee and the manager keep the lines of communication open.

As expected, our interactive panel session featuring CAI’s experts fielded many questions on the hot topic of implementing the new overtime rule. The experts cautioned employers to not wait until December, to take this time to understand those potentially impacted positions. For example, if a position is currently below the threshold of $47,476, and that employee works very little overtime, then raising them to the exempt level may cost you more in the long run. There are many different situations depending on the employer, number, and type of employees. You’ll want to choose the option that works best for your employees and your company.

Trying to plan for implementation of the new rule can get overwhelming quickly. Learn more about how CAI can help you with implementing the Overtime Rule.

Form 5500 Revisions Impact Both Small And Large Employers

Tuesday, September 20th, 2016

The post below is a guest blog from Rob Krieg who serves as Principal, Health & Welfare Consultant for CAI’s employee benefits partner Hill, Chesson & Woody.

hcw5500revisionsblogThe Department of Labor (DOL), the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), and the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation (PBGC) recently proposed significant changes to the form 5500 which has implications for both large employers and small employers. Targeting an effective date of 2019 plan year filings, the recent DOL Factsheet explains that many changes are on the horizon in an attempt to modernize and improve the Form 5500 annual return/report filed by employee benefit plans.  They identify the driving forces behind the changes include a desire to 1) modernize financial reporting, 2) provide greater information regarding group health plans, 3) enhance data mine-ability, 4 ) improve service provider fee information, and 5) enhance compliance with ERISA and the code.

The most notable proposed changes include:

  • Removing the small group exemption where previously many employers with less than 100 enrolled participants were exempt from filing;
  • Adding a new comprehensive schedule J (Group Health Plan Information) requirement;
  • New Schedule C requirement for each service provider;
  • And an expanded schedule H for funded plans.

Regardless of a group’s size, benefit plans should pay special attention to the new Schedule J requirements. Plans will now be asked to complete information on the types of benefits offered and the funding methods, including if benefits are HDHP, health FSA or HRA.  There will also be questions on participant contributions and employer contributions as well as enrollment information, including participants and dependents.  There appears to be requirements for claims data (including claims submitted, denied, appealed, paid, and where claims are paid from – insurer, trust or employer general assets.  And last but not least, there will be a focus on plan compliance with questions around COBRA, grandfathered status, MLR rebates, HIPAA, GINA, MHP SBC requirements, and SPD requirements.

As traditionally occurs, the DOL has asked for comments to the proposed regulations and these comments are due by October 4, 2016.  It is clear that the agencies are working together to significantly increase Form 5500 reporting obligations for many employers with group health plans. As explained in the fact sheet, the agencies are looking to update the filing requirement to gather data sufficient to support their enforcement efforts. Therefore, employers should take note and make sure to tighten up their benefit plan compliance over the next year.  The silver lining is that the agencies have provided plenty of lead time for employer’s to get into compliance.

If you have questions about these new regulations, or about your health benefit plan’s compliance with some of the regulations mentioned in the proposed regulations, contact your HCW consultant.

Pharmacies, Big Pharma, and Rising Prescription Prices

Tuesday, June 28th, 2016

The post below is a guest blog from Steve Byrd who serves as Principal, Health & Welfare Consultant for CAI’s employee benefits partner Hill, Chesson & Woody.

Rising health costsA key trend among medical plans lately has been the move away from traditional pharmacy tiers. In the traditional model, generics — regardless of cost — reside under the least expensive copay tiers on your medical plan. In contrast, brand- name medications reside under the higher, more expensive copay tiers.  For many years this model was the norm, and most consumers became very familiar with it.  However, continued pressure to reduce cost has forced insurers to re-evaluate this traditional view.  It is expected by some, that by the year 2024, pharmacy costs will equal half of our overall medical costs.

Many brand name medications are coming off of their patents, creating opportunity for generics to evolve.  Traditionally, these generics have offered great savings over their brand name counterparts. However, many of generics are now entering the market at prices much higher than historical levels, creating new pressure on insurers to hold down costs.

In response to these increasing costs, insurers are re-evaluating their pharmacy tiering.  Generic medications are being treated no differently than brand name medications; These drugs are being tiered based on their overall cost regardless of their designation as a brand or generic medication.  Pharmacy pricing changes are catching many people off-guard.  They don’t understand why their generic medication, which used to be offered in a more affordable tier on, might now be Tier 3 or Tier 4 on their carrier’s formulary.  Consumers are having to work even harder to understand their carrier’s pharmacy benefits. They are having more direct conversations with their providers and pharmacists to try to minimize their out-of-pocket costs, which are increasing with no end in sight.

If insurance carriers are going to be able to offer competitive priced medical plans, gaining better control over rising pharmacy costs is critical.  Pharmacy expenses account for a significant portion the average person’s overall medical expenses, and both consumers and carriers are feeling the pain.  One insurance carrier is even suing its Pharmacy Benefit Manager for $3 billion over questioned pharmacy charges.

Fortunately for consumers, there are many new Rx tools popping up that can help members navigate their benefits. Goodrx.com and healthiestyou.com are good examples. A recent Consumer Reports article provides additional guidance on ways consumers can save on pharmacy costs. Consumers also need to evaluate options at their local pharmacies, as they can often find some of the higher priced generics offered at lower costs through a local pharmacy’s prescription plan.

As healthcare spending continues to increase, and pharmacy costs continue to become a larger portion of the cost, more pressure will be applied towards controlling pharmaceutical costs. Consumers will continue to see changes to their pharmacy benefits and their carriers designated carrier’s prescription formulary.

 

Conflicts Of Interest: 3 Recommendations For Business Owners

Tuesday, November 17th, 2015

The post below is a guest blog from Todd Yates who serves as partner and CEO for CAI’s employee benefits partner Hill, Chesson & Woody.

Conflicts of interest can present themselves at any time, in all aspects of our lives. Where is the line drawn? It requires keen observation to identify them followed by great discipline to abstain from taking part. Many professions have procedures set up to help identify potential conflicts and to guide the involved individuals around them safely.

For example, attorneys search within their firm to see if there are any situations where they could be representing another entity that would create conflict with the representation they are providing for you. Real estate professionals have to disclose if they are working as the agent of the buyer/seller or both. Your CPA will not serve as your auditor as well as your tax preparer.

When it comes to employee benefits, how do you ensure your advisor is really serving as your advisor – not with some other entity’s interest in mind?

My first recommendation is to examine your contractual agreement. Does it clearly identify the services that your broker will provide and outline payment? Does it explain who will pay compensation? If you aren’t paying it, who is? What influence might this paying entity have on your broker’s behavior? Is the method of payment in alignment with your best interest? For example, if the broker’s compensation is a percentage of premium, does it make sense that they would earn more as your costs go up? Does that align with your interest? At HCW, we have full transparency around our compensation in all of these aspects.

My second recommendation would be to examine the products your broker is recommending to you. Does that representative have any influence, other than your needs, impacting their recommendations? Our industry is notorious for brokers getting into the product business. At HCW, we refer to it as the manufacturing business. If your broker goes out and buys a product, or private labels a product, does that bias their opinion?

We have seen many examples of this over the years. The most recent phenomena is brokers buying private exchanges and/or HRIS systems. Once their organization made this investment, I wonder how many of their clients suddenly became “perfect” candidates for this solution? We have seen it with brokers that deliver FSA services, Cobra services, HRA services, etc. Are they ever going to direct you to another vendor’s service over their own? As the old saying goes, “If all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail”.

My third recommendation is to evaluate the relationship with your broker and the insurer/reinsurer for your organization. Is your broker serving in a conflicted role there? A great example of this is the emergence of captives. Some brokers have elected to create their own captives. In this case, the broker has likely engaged the services of several third parties to create the captive, but by leading the direction of the captive and the underwriting decisions, whose interest are they really representing? When it is time to negotiate your costs with the captive, are they advocating on behalf of your best interest, or on behalf of the captives’ interest and all of their other clients that are in it? Inherently there are two sides to this negotiation and being on both sides is a conflict of interest. A captive may be a great solution, but have your broker find one that doesn’t position their interest against yours.

At Hill, Chesson & Woody, we understand and embrace that we are in the advice and guidance business. Our clients hire us, expect us to learn their business, the accompanying strategy of that business, and identify methods to create employee benefit plans that align with that business strategy. That is our product! In order to remain clear of conflict we steer away from the previously mentioned scenarios. The only time we elect to break this direction is when we cannot source solutions in the marketplace to provide the outcome our clients need. Then, and only then, will we build a product.

A recent example is HCW’s enrollment services unit. The market was not responding with good solutions for middle market employers. As a result, we elected to build our own service here. We used other company’s HRIS tools and then built the complimentary professional services to accompany it.

Staying true to these principles is hard when you are looking for differentiators amongst brokers. Many firms depend on creating these products to make themselves appear exclusive in some way. I would encourage you to step back from your relationship and look for these types of misalignment and conflicts of interest. Taking the time to evaluate your relationships will help you ensure your broker is only aligned with the best interests of your organization.

Worksite Wellness Programs Not Just A Fad, Survey Shows

Thursday, August 20th, 2015

The post below is a guest blog from Meaghan Roach who serves as Health Management Advisor for CAI’s employee benefits partner Hill, Chesson & Woody.

BalanceA few weeks ago, the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) unveiled the results of their 2015 employee benefits survey at their national conference. The results? Of no surprise to many in the industry, health and worksite wellness programs continue to grow in prevalence and popularity. SHRM attributes much of this to employers’ desires to combat rising health care costs. In addition to slowing the cost trend, health management programs may also increase productivity, decrease absenteeism, and improve a company’s ability to recruit and retain top talent.

Based on the survey, popular health management programs included biometric screenings and health assessments, tobacco cessation programs, lifestyle coaching, and preventive programs targeted at employees with chronic conditions. New to the scene this year are company-provided fitness/activity trackers and fitness competitions, which are offered by 13 percent and 34 percent of the respondents, respectively. New offerings in the past few years seem to have a common theme of physical activity, with standing desks (25 percent of respondents offered in 2015), on-site fitness classes (17 percent), and off-site fitness class subsidies (16 percent) all being added to the survey’s options in the past three years.

Health and wellness benefits that saw the largest increase in prevalence over the past five years involved premium differentials for participation in a variety of activities, including preventive care, completion of an annual health risk assessment, and not using tobacco products.

BenefitsPro summarized several other areas of the survey – including telecommuting, health savings accounts and family friendly benefits – but noted that wellness programs are certainly a key takeaway from this year’s results. In fact, as more millennials enter the workforce and demand a strong company culture, worksite wellness programs are becoming almost expected in the minds of potential employees. Eighty percent of survey respondents provide employees with wellness resources and educational information, and seventy percent indicated that they offer wellness programs, suggesting an attempt to integrate health initiatives into company culture across the majority of organizations in the United States.

Interested in how your company can offer initiatives like the above that can have a positive effect on employee morale and productivity, and ultimately your bottom line? Contact our Health Management team and allow us to help guide you through development of a wellness program to complement your employee benefits package.

 

 

Top 5 Things Employees Enjoy Most about Working for Their Company

Thursday, May 28th, 2015

In today’s video blog, Sean Walsh, CAI’s Survey Support Specialist, shares the top five reasons employees say they enjoy working for their employers.

He starts by asking, “Have you ever wondered what your employees think of your organization?”

Finding out whether your employees love or hate their workplace can be discovered by measuring employee attitudes through an Employee Opinion Survey (EOS). Sean says they are one of the tried-and-true methods of HR.

He shares that in 2014, over 3000 employees completed an employee opinion survey with CAI. In the video, Sean reveals the top five things that employees enjoy most about working for their current employers and why they enjoy these five workplace aspects:

 5) Benefits 

 4) Management

 3) Schedule / Hours 

 2) Job Responsibilities / My Work 

 1) Fellow Employees / Enjoy the People 

If you have any questions regarding Employee Opinion Surveys, or possibly conducting an Employee Opinion Survey yourself, please feel free to reach out to Sean at Sean.Walsh@capital.org.