Posts Tagged ‘emotional intelligence’

4 Ways to Increase the Effectiveness of Your Management Staff

Thursday, June 28th, 2012

Your managers are one of your company’s strongest assets. They help your company run efficiently by supervising others and delegating duties, relaying information from senior leadership and making sure projects get completed. Increasing the effectiveness of your management team will benefit your organization’s productivity, revenue and morale. Giving extra attention to the growth of your managers isn’t time consuming or expensive. Try using the methods below to maximize the potential of your team leaders:

 Sharpen Their Skills

Whether you let them expense industry related literature, such as magazines and journals, to the company, or pay their way to attend a conference related to their position, helping your leaders attain new skills and knowledge will improve their job satisfaction and productivity. You’ll also see an improvement in their team’s performance.

Increase Their EI

Recent research indicates that employees with strong Emotional Intelligence (a person’s capacity for controlling his or her own emotions and recognizing and reacting to the emotions of others) can carry on and be successful through hard economic times and tough business predicaments. Not every employee comes equipped with a high EI, but taking steps to improve their EI is something all employees can do.

Strengthen Their Time Management

Managers juggle several tasks at once. They assign projects to their direct reports, implement strategies from senior management and work to complete their own projects. Learning to effectively manage time is an essential skill that managers should try to achieve. When leaders practice good time management, fewer errors occur, deadlines and results are met and last minute panicking is avoided.

Provide Feedback and Rewards

Make sure you consistently provide your managers with positive and constructive feedback on their performance. Help them succeed by encouraging them to give their best and attain their goals. Personally and publically acknowledge their accomplishments, and show your appreciation for their contributions whenever you can.

For more strategies to maximize the performance of your managers, supervisors and other company leaders, join us at CAI’s Training Showcase on July 19 in Greensboro and July 20 in Raleigh. Both programs are free and will run from 8:30 a.m. to 2:15 p.m. At each location you’ll experience abbreviated training sessions and participate in learning exercises to help you make the right development decisions for your staff. Come for a few hours or stay for the whole event to review CAI’s training options. Find more information and full agendas here: www.capital.org/showcase.

Photo Source: Victor1558

Looking to Add High Performers to Your Organization? Find Candidates with These Traits.

Thursday, May 3rd, 2012

Your employees have a significant impact on whether your business thrives or dies, but building a strong workforce is not an easy task. Choosing the right people to fill your open positions should be done with care and an overall goal of company success. People considered high performers should be your most desirable candidates. These workers are critical for achieving positive business results because they exceed company expectations, serve as role models to other employees, make solid decisions and continually offer innovative ideas.

If you’re looking to build a powerful staff, look for prospective employees with the following qualities:

Energy and Optimism

Top performing employees are energetic. They work efficiently when assigned new projects and are eager to turn in completed work before or by their deadlines. When they finish a project, they quickly move on to the next one. They also remain positive while at work by not harping on mistakes or worrying about unfavorable outcomes. The energy and optimism high performers exude reach other staff members, which helps the whole company boost productivity.

High EI and Great Communicator

High Emotional Intelligence is often engrained in high performing employees. They use their talent to successfully understand and react to the actions of others. They easily make great relationships with their coworkers, and they are able to remain calm and help others stay calm during stressful situations. Another strength they share is strong communication skills. Top employees effortlessly express their ideas and communicate frequently with their supervisors to ensure they deliver desired results.

Self Starter and Continuous Learner

Stronger performers are almost always motivated to do their best. They are autonomous workers who manage their time effectively to  produce high-quality work for their managers and organization. These employees take the initiative to try new workflow processes and suggest ways to improve business productivity. They want to cultivate skills they use regularly and also gain new knowledge in their field. Both of these characteristics will prove beneficial to your company.

When you attract top performers to your organization, work hard to ensure they have the support and resources they need to be successful. Failing to do so will most likely result in their resignation. For more information on finding high performers to add to your staff, please contact a member of CAI’s Advice and Counsel Team at 919-878-9222 or 33-668-7746.

Photo Souce: Victor1558

4 Tips to Improve Your Emotional Intelligence in the Workplace

Thursday, April 26th, 2012

Bruce Clarke, CAI’s CEO, started his latest edition of his N&O Column, the View from HR, with a quote:

“People are emotional first and rational second: Logic makes people think; emotions make people act.”*

Bruce says that having strong Emotional Intelligence is key to personal and professional success. Emotional intelligence (EI) describes a person’s capacity for controlling his or her own emotions and recognizing and understanding the emotions of others. EI also reveals how people react to others’ emotions and how they manage their various relationships.

In today’s business world, having a great EI is a strong competitive advantage against colleagues and peers who don’t. Employees with high EIs are beneficial to their organizations for many reasons. They build great relationships with their coworkers and clients, they’re graceful and collected in high-stress situations, and they’re able to understand and react appropriately to the actions of others.

Bruce says that business leaders with strong EIs are more successful in hiring, managing growth problems, leading people and teaching others. Refining your own emotional intelligence will help you become a better employee and leader at your organization. Try the following 4 tips to improve your EI:

1.       Analyze Yourself

Be mindful of your own emotions and how you respond to different emotional situations. Be honest with yourself to determine your strengths and weaknesses, and how they might affect others. Work to take responsibility for all of your actions. Be open-minded, and stay positive in different business scenarios.

2.       Really Listen

While others are talking, instead of listening, many people are thinking up their response. People with high EIs are able to focus on what the speaker is actually saying. Try to direct your attention on understanding what the person is communicating. Summarize what you think you heard to the speaker, and ask him or her questions to clarify if needed.

3.       Be Aware of Body Language

Understanding body language and nonverbal communication will help you identify how someone is truly feeling. Practice recognizing whether someone’s body language matches up to what he or she is actually saying, and react accordingly. Watch for facial expressions, tone of voice, and body and eye movements.

4.       Identify What Causes You Stress

Whether it’s an overload of work or sick children at home, there are a number of factors that can cause us stress. Identify the things that cause you the most stress, and recognize that you hold the power to bring yourself back to a calm state of mind. Practice constructive coping mechanisms, like exercise and meditation, to bring you back down when your stress levels are running high. Avoid taking your stress out on others.

Cultivating your Emotional Intelligence takes patience and time. For more strategies, you may consider participating in CAI’s class called Leveraging Your Emotional Intelligence.

*Quote from Reuven Bar-On, Ph.D. and the Emotional Quotient Inventory.

Photo Source: Victor1558

How to Spot a Great Recruiter for Your Next Hire

Tuesday, November 22nd, 2011

Securing qualified candidates for your company’s open positions is critical for hiring the right applicant. If you decide to use an outside recruiter to search for potential employees, it is imperative that your recruiter supplies you with high-quality job seekers—anything less than high-quality is a waste of your organization’s time, resources and money.

Ensure your recruiter’s picks will lead to success by looking for qualities that indicate that he is great at his job. Here are some helpful tips to discern a gem from a dud:

1. Industry Knowledge

Great recruiters are not necessarily experts on every position they try to fill, but they do have the necessary industry knowledge to know if candidates possess the right education, past experience and work ethic to be successful employees in a specific field.

2. Hunting and Gathering

Great recruiters are great networkers. They know that only searching databases is not the best approach to finding a winning candidate. They pick up the phone, use social media and reach out to people in their networks to select a company’s new hire.

3. The Right Questions

Great recruiters ask both the company and the candidate good questions to see if there is a match. Asking you the nature of your business, what your company culture is like and how much overtime would be required are signs that your recruiter is doing his homework to narrow down prospects. Receiving answers to good questions will help him communicate your expectations and the job opening correctly.    

4. Energy, Honesty and Attentiveness

Great recruiters are energetic and work with passion to fulfill their clients’ requests. Because they want both companies and candidates to be satisfied, they do not embellish positives or downplay negatives when describing one to the other. They also have high emotional intelligence and are willing to give out their personal information and spend time discussing questions related to the project’s progress.

For your next open position, consider enlisting a great recruiter or adopting some of the strategies above to attract and hire your next employee. CAI provides recruiting services as part of its HR On Demand. For additional information, please see http://j.mp/hr-od or contact an account manager at 919‑878‑9222 or 336‑668‑7746.

**Workplace Insights will take a break on Thursday, Nov. 24, for the Thanksgiving Holiday. We will return Tuesday, Nov. 29, with a new post. Happy Holidays!**

Photo Source: bpsusf

 

Employees Who Display Emotional Intelligence Add Value to the Workplace

Thursday, October 20th, 2011

The economy is still down, budgets continue to get cut and staffs remain lean. Producing good work under stressful conditions can be challenging for many employees. The country’s high unemployment rate created a highly competitive job market, which now allows employers to be more selective in their hiring decisions. In order to continue to reach their goals, organizations realize that they need workers who can persevere through tough economic times or strenuous business situations, as well as understand the needs and feelings of their coworkers.  

Surveys indicate that hiring managers place more value on candidates’ emotional intelligence than their ability to fit the job description. Emotional intelligence (EI) describes a person’s capacity for controlling his or her own emotions and recognizing and understanding the emotions of others. EI also reveals how people react to others’ emotions and how they manage their various relationships.

People with a high EI are gems in the workplace. Because they have strong interpersonal skills, they offer many helpful qualities, including mitigating conflict productively, remaining calm when facing pressure and empathizing with their colleagues. Employees with a high EI are also great listeners and take criticism well. These qualities make efficient managers, inspiring motivators and thoughtful decision makers.

The personal attributes found in people with a high EI are coveted in the business world. As an employer this does not necessarily mean that you have to hire new staff members or terminate those who lack consideration, tactfulness, grace, etc. EI can be improved with continuous coaching and frequent feedback.

Help your organization achieve its goals by disseminating the strategies below to encourage your staff to manage how they handle workplace emotions:

Gauge your attitude at the office:

People with a high EI control their emotions instead of having their emotions control them. Make an effort to recognize that your individual emotions affect how you act and how others react to you. Draft a running list of emotions and actions that are appropriate for work and ones that are inappropriate. Revisit this list when you feel your emotions taking over.

Form strong workplace relationships:

Everyone at your organization can potentially provide you with a mutually beneficial work friendship. Establish relationships on being supportive and helpful to each other’s work responsibilities. Friendships based on gossip or fear will not increase EI. Good work relationships help create a more positive work environment for all parties involved.

Strive to be valued instead of right:

Influencing coworkers positively is a common goal among those with a high EI. Being right all the time might boost your ego, but it does not exclusively demonstrate your capabilities. Show that you are valuable and productive by the assistance you offer and the tasks you complete. Your actions will display your worth to your employer more than your desire to always be right will.

For additional information on EI or tips to improve the EI of your staff members, please contact an account manager at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746 and inquire about CAI’s class called Emotional Intelligence at Work.

Photo Source: KaiChanVong

CAI’s June 2011 Training Showcase

Tuesday, July 12th, 2011

On Friday, June 24, more than 45 HR professionals and company executives visited CAI’s Raleigh location to attend its June 2011 Training Showcase. CAI’s Training Showcases are free events, held three times a year at the company’s Raleigh and Greensboro offices, and they offer opportunities for company decision makers to gather information on CAI’s diverse training options.

The June event began with CAI’s Director of Learning Services, Colleen Cunningham, asking participants why they decided to attend. Several enthusiastic audience members interjected various reasons, such as seeing the event in CAI’s management newsletter and wanting to help employees improve in their positions.

“Our company is growing, and we need to expand our training, so we wanted to see which programs were best,” said Bonnie Wooten, HR Generalist at Implus Footcare.

Following a brief introduction of CAI’s staff and principal training facilitators, Colleen shared with the audience some of the training services that CAI provides, as well as the organization’s overall education philosophy. The Learning and Development Team members base each of their courses on CAI’s learning model, which includes items to measure learning results, such as self-assessments; defined learning objectives; and interactive exercises, role-plays and case studies. After guests learned how CAI strives to maximize training results, they were free to attend sessions that offered snapshots of what potential participants would expect to experience. Some of the sessions included:

CAI facilitators work to ensure that all of their programs are interactive to keep participants alert and engaged in the information they receive and the activities that they perform. The June 2011 Training Showcase facilitators, Brad Geiger, Maureen Bertolo and Kelly Barefoot, also added passion and expertise to their sessions.

For example, in Maureen’s session Fundamentals of Management Certification Program, she asked all participants to stand up and walk around the classroom to introduce themselves, which involved saying their name, title and company they represented. This activity helped them become familiar with each other while also teaching them that getting to know staff members is an important part of being in management.

Brad and Kelly utilized real-world examples to relate to audience members in their sessions.  Kelly asked her participants in Developing Others Through Coaching to think of great coaches—job, school or sports related—and the qualities that made them effective teachers. This exercise helped attendees discover strategies to grow successful employees.

“Their use of interactive role playing is very effective,” said Janice Willmott, Chief Administrative Officer at Disability Rights NC, when describing the facilitators’ teaching methods.

The following are additional descriptions participants used to characterize the teaching styles of Brad, Maureen and Kelly: energetic, dynamic, knowledgeable, well-informed and efficient. Their teaching approach encouraged participants to interject frequently, ask thought-provoking questions and cooperate in problem solving.

Not only did participants get to sample programs that generally run for two days, but also they received binders full of each program’s key objectives, learning deliverables and main points of discussion.

The evaluations from CAI’s June 2011 Training Showcase revealed that participants obtained a good sense of each session’s layout, and several participants commented that the event exceeded their expectations, making the experience great.

If you’d like to learn more about CAI’s training programs, please visit our website at www.capital.org or contact a member of CAI’s Learning and Development Team at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746.