Posts Tagged ‘EI’

4 Ways to Increase the Effectiveness of Your Management Staff

Thursday, June 28th, 2012

Your managers are one of your company’s strongest assets. They help your company run efficiently by supervising others and delegating duties, relaying information from senior leadership and making sure projects get completed. Increasing the effectiveness of your management team will benefit your organization’s productivity, revenue and morale. Giving extra attention to the growth of your managers isn’t time consuming or expensive. Try using the methods below to maximize the potential of your team leaders:

 Sharpen Their Skills

Whether you let them expense industry related literature, such as magazines and journals, to the company, or pay their way to attend a conference related to their position, helping your leaders attain new skills and knowledge will improve their job satisfaction and productivity. You’ll also see an improvement in their team’s performance.

Increase Their EI

Recent research indicates that employees with strong Emotional Intelligence (a person’s capacity for controlling his or her own emotions and recognizing and reacting to the emotions of others) can carry on and be successful through hard economic times and tough business predicaments. Not every employee comes equipped with a high EI, but taking steps to improve their EI is something all employees can do.

Strengthen Their Time Management

Managers juggle several tasks at once. They assign projects to their direct reports, implement strategies from senior management and work to complete their own projects. Learning to effectively manage time is an essential skill that managers should try to achieve. When leaders practice good time management, fewer errors occur, deadlines and results are met and last minute panicking is avoided.

Provide Feedback and Rewards

Make sure you consistently provide your managers with positive and constructive feedback on their performance. Help them succeed by encouraging them to give their best and attain their goals. Personally and publically acknowledge their accomplishments, and show your appreciation for their contributions whenever you can.

For more strategies to maximize the performance of your managers, supervisors and other company leaders, join us at CAI’s Training Showcase on July 19 in Greensboro and July 20 in Raleigh. Both programs are free and will run from 8:30 a.m. to 2:15 p.m. At each location you’ll experience abbreviated training sessions and participate in learning exercises to help you make the right development decisions for your staff. Come for a few hours or stay for the whole event to review CAI’s training options. Find more information and full agendas here: www.capital.org/showcase.

Photo Source: Victor1558

Looking to Add High Performers to Your Organization? Find Candidates with These Traits.

Thursday, May 3rd, 2012

Your employees have a significant impact on whether your business thrives or dies, but building a strong workforce is not an easy task. Choosing the right people to fill your open positions should be done with care and an overall goal of company success. People considered high performers should be your most desirable candidates. These workers are critical for achieving positive business results because they exceed company expectations, serve as role models to other employees, make solid decisions and continually offer innovative ideas.

If you’re looking to build a powerful staff, look for prospective employees with the following qualities:

Energy and Optimism

Top performing employees are energetic. They work efficiently when assigned new projects and are eager to turn in completed work before or by their deadlines. When they finish a project, they quickly move on to the next one. They also remain positive while at work by not harping on mistakes or worrying about unfavorable outcomes. The energy and optimism high performers exude reach other staff members, which helps the whole company boost productivity.

High EI and Great Communicator

High Emotional Intelligence is often engrained in high performing employees. They use their talent to successfully understand and react to the actions of others. They easily make great relationships with their coworkers, and they are able to remain calm and help others stay calm during stressful situations. Another strength they share is strong communication skills. Top employees effortlessly express their ideas and communicate frequently with their supervisors to ensure they deliver desired results.

Self Starter and Continuous Learner

Stronger performers are almost always motivated to do their best. They are autonomous workers who manage their time effectively to  produce high-quality work for their managers and organization. These employees take the initiative to try new workflow processes and suggest ways to improve business productivity. They want to cultivate skills they use regularly and also gain new knowledge in their field. Both of these characteristics will prove beneficial to your company.

When you attract top performers to your organization, work hard to ensure they have the support and resources they need to be successful. Failing to do so will most likely result in their resignation. For more information on finding high performers to add to your staff, please contact a member of CAI’s Advice and Counsel Team at 919-878-9222 or 33-668-7746.

Photo Souce: Victor1558

4 Tips to Improve Your Emotional Intelligence in the Workplace

Thursday, April 26th, 2012

Bruce Clarke, CAI’s CEO, started his latest edition of his N&O Column, the View from HR, with a quote:

“People are emotional first and rational second: Logic makes people think; emotions make people act.”*

Bruce says that having strong Emotional Intelligence is key to personal and professional success. Emotional intelligence (EI) describes a person’s capacity for controlling his or her own emotions and recognizing and understanding the emotions of others. EI also reveals how people react to others’ emotions and how they manage their various relationships.

In today’s business world, having a great EI is a strong competitive advantage against colleagues and peers who don’t. Employees with high EIs are beneficial to their organizations for many reasons. They build great relationships with their coworkers and clients, they’re graceful and collected in high-stress situations, and they’re able to understand and react appropriately to the actions of others.

Bruce says that business leaders with strong EIs are more successful in hiring, managing growth problems, leading people and teaching others. Refining your own emotional intelligence will help you become a better employee and leader at your organization. Try the following 4 tips to improve your EI:

1.       Analyze Yourself

Be mindful of your own emotions and how you respond to different emotional situations. Be honest with yourself to determine your strengths and weaknesses, and how they might affect others. Work to take responsibility for all of your actions. Be open-minded, and stay positive in different business scenarios.

2.       Really Listen

While others are talking, instead of listening, many people are thinking up their response. People with high EIs are able to focus on what the speaker is actually saying. Try to direct your attention on understanding what the person is communicating. Summarize what you think you heard to the speaker, and ask him or her questions to clarify if needed.

3.       Be Aware of Body Language

Understanding body language and nonverbal communication will help you identify how someone is truly feeling. Practice recognizing whether someone’s body language matches up to what he or she is actually saying, and react accordingly. Watch for facial expressions, tone of voice, and body and eye movements.

4.       Identify What Causes You Stress

Whether it’s an overload of work or sick children at home, there are a number of factors that can cause us stress. Identify the things that cause you the most stress, and recognize that you hold the power to bring yourself back to a calm state of mind. Practice constructive coping mechanisms, like exercise and meditation, to bring you back down when your stress levels are running high. Avoid taking your stress out on others.

Cultivating your Emotional Intelligence takes patience and time. For more strategies, you may consider participating in CAI’s class called Leveraging Your Emotional Intelligence.

*Quote from Reuven Bar-On, Ph.D. and the Emotional Quotient Inventory.

Photo Source: Victor1558