Posts Tagged ‘compensation’

Winter Months Bring Seasonal HR Challenges

Thursday, November 10th, 2016

Winter months are just around the corner and with them comes colder weather.  We don’t get as much “white stuff” as our Northern Brethren but when we do things get messy.  Be reminded that employee injuries on employer owned and maintained parking lots may be covered by workers’ compensation and may be OSHA recordable depending upon circumstances relating to the injury.  If injuries occur at a reasonable time (just prior to or just after work) and injuries result in medical treatment, days away from work or restricted activity, both workers’ comp and OSHA record keeping come into play. winterweather

Winter weather poses a particular problem regarding parking lot and sidewalk injuries.  Both should be maintained free of snow and ice to prevent employee injuries.  Potential costly injures to customers, vendors and to the general public would not be covered by workers’ compensation but by an employer’s liability insurance.

Employers also need to be aware of the dangers of overexertion in winter months.  Liberty Mutual Insurance Company conducted a study a few years ago revealing that more than 25% of disabling workplace injuries resulted from overexertion.  Overexertion also poses a major threat to ones’ health and life outside of work, especially in geographical areas that experience extreme snow and ice accumulation like the Northeast this past winter.  Around 100 people die in the US every winter as a result of shoveling snow. For more tips dealing with colder weather go to https://www.ready.gov/winter-weather.

Perhaps a more vexing issue we deal with each year surrounds pay practices during inclement weather.  Exempt employees are paid on a salaried basis. If the company is closed, the exempt employee must be paid for the day(s) to maintain the exemption status. It is the company’s decision as to whether or not exempts are required to take a vacation day.  Keep in mind that if the exempt does not have vacation or PTO to cover the absence, the exempt must be paid.

If the office is open and the exempt decides not to report to work, the day can be charged to vacation or PTO. If in this situation the exempt does not have vacation or PTO, the company is allowed to dock for the day due to personal reasons. This is one of the allowed deductions under the FLSA without destroying the exemption status. Be reminded, however, that if the exempt works any part of the day, the exempt must be paid for the entire day. This often comes in to play when the exempt does not come into work but works a partial day from a laptop or other electronic device.

If you have more questions regarding your Inclement Weather Policy, contact CAI’s Advice & Resolution team today.

Time to Break the Link?

Tuesday, October 18th, 2016

Conventional wisdom often creates a strong linkage between performance evaluation ratings and compensation. On its face, this link seems completely appropriate. After all, it is only natural for people to think that stronger performance deserves more pay, weaker performance less.

However, a performance / compensation model with this direct link has a number of inherent downsides. First, many managers “force fit” employee rankings into desired compensation distributions in order maintain budget.  This practice discredits the performance system, breeds cynicism, and demotivates employees.performance-ratings

Another unwanted side effect of a direct linkage between performance rating and compensation is that many employees worry excessively about the pay implications related to the differences in ratings. As a consequence, they become fixated on their rating and drown out any discussion about developmental needs.

Focusing less on the link itself between performance and compensation allows companies to worry less about tracking and rating, and the consequences thereof, and more about building capabilities and inspiring employees to stretch their skills and aptitudes.  Now, to be clear, I am not suggesting that compensation has no linkage with performance. I simply believe that the focus on the immediate linkage, at the time of the review, has several drawbacks that take away from the intended outcome of the performance review process and discussion.

Here is the rub: Since only a relatively few employees are truly standouts, (5-10%, perhaps 15%) why risk demotivating the broad majority of your employee base by focusing almost exclusively on the linkage between pay and performance.

Even General Electric, a long time proponent of the performance – pay linkage model and all the related processes and templates that go with it, is currently reinventing itself in this arena.  They are considering options ranging from dispensing with the entire model to a more gradual shift over time. They also understand that they must equip their managers with new tools and methods to motivate and reward employees.

The growing need for companies to inspire and motivate performance makes it critical to create managers and supervisors who are better coaches. Without great and frequent coaching, it’s difficult to set goals flexibly and often, to help employees stretch their jobs, or to give people greater responsibility and autonomy while demanding more expertise and judgment from them.

If you’re rethinking your organization’s performance management process, you don’t have to go it alone. Contact CAI’s Advice & Resolution team to help you and your leadership team evaluate alternative models and coach you through making a change.

Tom_Sheehan-circle

 

Tom Sheehan brings 20+ years of extensive, broad based strategic, tactical and practical HR experience to CAI’s Advice & Resolution team.  He advises HR and other business leaders on talent management, organizational effectiveness, employee engagement, M&A’s, and employee relations.

Learning the Best Practices for Total Rewards in 2017

Thursday, September 22nd, 2016

Nearly 250 North Carolina HR professionals and executives attended CAI’s 2016 Compensation & Benefits Conference on September 15 and 16. Conference participants were eager to interact with one another and hear the latest on engaging and retaining top talent in this challenging economy.

Our three keynote speakers: Kerry Chou, of WorldatWork, Michael Patrick, of Willis Towers Watson’s Atlanta Talent & Rewards Practice, and CAI’s very own Molly Hegeman broke down ways to evaluate existing total rewards strategies using current trend information and insight from survey data. img_0076Employee engagement and success rate were a common trend shared by all speakers.

In Performance Management 101, Kerry Chou discussed the three questions an employer needs to ask themselves about an employee for the employee to be successful:

  • Is the employee CAPABLE of doing the job?
  • Does the employee have the TOOLS to do the job?
  • Does the employee PERFORM?

Michael Patrick stated only four in ten employees globally are highly engaged. In order to optimize employee engagement, employees need to be capable, have the tools and resources readily available to them and have the performance rate their employers want. “Know your Market Position,” Molly Hegeman, VP of HR Services at CAI stated, what is your philosophy? Are you going to be a market leader, match the market or lag behind? Molly suggests determining your market position by looking at the external and internal values.

In addition to the keynote sessions, conference participants chose from 9 breakout sessions from creating salary structures, managing costs related to the ACA, transforming performance management and using culture as a competitive advantage. Jay Burchfield from Teamphoria shared that companies with engaged employees outperform their competition by 202%, yet one negative employee with a bad attitude can affect four or more employees around them. Employers need to strive to make their employees feel excited about their work. Rebecca Bottorff, Bandwidth, stated, “We should be rewarding people more often.” Reward your employees with what matters to them – and that will vary from person to person. Companies should be conducting quarterly reviews, and providing employees with on-going feedback from their managers. This will help both the employee and the manager keep the lines of communication open.

As expected, our interactive panel session featuring CAI’s experts fielded many questions on the hot topic of implementing the new overtime rule. The experts cautioned employers to not wait until December, to take this time to understand those potentially impacted positions. For example, if a position is currently below the threshold of $47,476, and that employee works very little overtime, then raising them to the exempt level may cost you more in the long run. There are many different situations depending on the employer, number, and type of employees. You’ll want to choose the option that works best for your employees and your company.

Trying to plan for implementation of the new rule can get overwhelming quickly. Learn more about how CAI can help you with implementing the Overtime Rule.

Have you registered for CAI’s 2016 Compensation & Benefits Conference?

Tuesday, August 2nd, 2016

Get ready for the 2016 Compensation & Benefits Conference! Top speakers will share their valuable industry insight to make your organization stand out from the crowd. You’ll learn cutting-edge techniques to reward, engage and retain top talent in a challenging economy.C&B Save the Date Blog

Join us for the 2016 Compensation & Benefits Conference on September 15th and September 16th at the McKimmon Center in Raleigh to receive practical solutions to some of your biggest HR challenges. With 11+ speakers and 2 panel sessions, this conference will equip you with the facts, insights and tools needed to translate current data and trends into a realistic action plan.

Four keynote presentations:

2016 Labor Market Trends: Considerations for Pay and Performance

Kerry Chou – WorldatWork

Attracting, Retaining and Engaging Top Talent

Michael Patrick – Willis Towers Watson’s Atlanta Talent & Rewards Practice

Leverage Marketplace Trends for Total Reward Strategy Decisions

Molly G. Hegeman – CAI

New FLSA Regulations: What Employers are doing to Adopt the Changes

CAI’s George Ports, Emily Hinesley and Cynthia Daniel

Choose from 9 interactive breakout sessions led by local Compensation & Benefits experts. Some of the topics include:

ACA: We Came, We Saw, We Conquered – Shifting Focus to Cost Control

Skip Woody – Hill, Chesson & Woody

Creating a Salary Structure: 101

Jennifer Solomonson – The Employers Association

Creating a Salary Structure: Advanced Application

Jennifer Solomonson – The Employers Association

Hot Topics in Wage and Hour Law

Amie Flowers Carmack – Morningstar Law Group

How to Get Employees on Track for Retirement

Jake Connors – Compass Financial Partners

An Internal Perspective on Market Analysis

CAI Member Panel

Join the 250 North Carolina business and HR professionals responsible for compensation and benefits plans and strategies at this amazing Conference!

Register today!

How to Prepare for Difficult Compensation Discussions

Thursday, December 31st, 2015
Molly Hegeman, VP of HR Services

Molly Hegeman, VP of HR Services

In today’s post Molly Hegeman, CAI’s Vice President of  HR Services, shares helpful strategies for approaching conversations about pay with preparation and confidence. 

If you’ve been in HR long enough, you’ve inevitably experienced uncomfortable conversations about pay. Whether it’s with an unhappy employee or a frustrated manager, your staff looks to you for answers in these emotionally charged situations.

So what can you do to feel more comfortable and prepared the next time you’re questioned about pay?

First, don’t say “No” right off the bat. Start by asking questions and gathering information.

  • Why is pay suddenly an issue?
  • If it’s about an employee, is he/she a good performer?
  • Does the employee demonstrate potential with your organization?
  • If it’s about hiring, has there been recent turnover in the position?
  • Are you having a difficult time making an offer to candidates because of pay?

Second,  agree to look into the situation. Research market data about the position. Go to trusted survey sources, like CAI’s NC Wage & Salary Survey, seek outside expertise.

  • Look for answers to questions about the position:
    • What is the market paying?
    • Is this a market-sensitive position?
    • Is this an issue about low supply of the skill set?
    • Are benefits and/or your total rewards package competitive?
  • Look for answers to questions about the employee(s):
    • How long has the employee(s) been in the position?
    • What is the performance history of the individual?
    • Is this employee a strong contributor with future potential?
    • Are there implications to other employees within the department?

Finally, don’t get defensive. Remaining calm will help you have a better conversation about the issue.  Your goal is to maintain an objective perspective and develop a credible position based on facts and knowledge, not emotion. They will most likely come to the conversation with plenty of emotion of their own, so addressing their concerns with facts and research will help you both understand the situation better and have a good follow-up conversation. Whether you end up agreeing to make an adjustment or providing rationale for why the pay is appropriate as is, you will be more credible and have confidence in your decision.

Helpful Information from 3 Presentations at the 2014 Compensation and Benefits Conference

Thursday, August 21st, 2014

Comp Ben Save Date 2014 (2)CAI hosted its 2014 Compensation and Benefits Conference at the McKimmon Center on Thursday, August 14 and Friday, August 15. More than 200 HR professionals and company executives attended the two-day event to review and discuss emerging workplace trends surrounding compensation, benefits and total rewards, as well as the impact these trends leave on culture and profitability.

This year’s conference speakers shared presentations on how to attract and motivate top talent, strategies to increase employee engagement, reinforcing a positive workplace culture, and more. Keynote presentations for the 2014 conference lineup included:

The Future of Attraction, Retention and Motivation: How Compensation Fits into the Process Anne Ruddy – WorldatWork

What Would Healthcare Look Like If Getting It at the Lowest Cost Was Your Key Priority? Skip Woody – Hill, Chesson & Woody Employee Benefit Services

Green Goldfish – 15 Ways to Drive Engagement & Reinforce Culture Stan Phelps – 9 INCH marketing

Leverage Marketplace Trends When Making Decisions about Compensation and Benefits Strategies Molly Hegeman – CAI

In addition to the keynote sessions, conference participants had the opportunity to attend several of the many breakout sessions. Why performance management fails, building high performing teams, work-site wellbeing, and understanding survey data are some of the topics of this year’s breakout sessions.

Below are three sets of insights conference speakers shared with last week’s audience:

–Anne Ruddy shared the changes in employee attitudes from recipients to consumers of rewards in her keynote presentation:

From:

Employer loyalty

Traditional work design

Pay = position

Retirement security

To:

Self-managed careers

Virtual, flexible environments

Pay = performance, market

Individual career management

 

–In the breakout session Why Performance Management Fails, Mike Maciekowich shared five reasons why companies need performance management systems:

  1. Help managers to observe their staff more closely and to do a better coaching job.
  2. Motivate employees by providing feedback on how they are doing.
  3. Provide back-up data for management decisions concerning advancement, transfers, dismissals, and so on.
  4. Improve organization development by identifying people with promotion potential and pin-pointing development needs.
  5. Establish a research and reference base for personnel decisions.

 

–CAI’s Sherry Hubbard-Bednasz explained the purpose of salary surveys in her presentation Taking the Mystery Out of Survey Data:

Salary surveys:

  • Provide a fair representation of pay practices occurring in the market
    • Sample reflects population
    • Consider source, methodology, transparency
  • Show how variables impact pay
    • Size of company
    • Industry/sector
    • Geography
  • Indicate trends in pay
    • Overall market movement
    • Movement in certain segments
  • Inform compensation decisions as a guide, not absolute

For additional information on CAI’s conferences, please go to https://www.capital.org/eweb/DynamicPage.aspx?site=cai&webcode=cai-training-conferences.

 

Compensation Rises as Top Contributor to Job Satisfaction for Employees

Tuesday, July 15th, 2014

money blogAccording to a recent research report by The Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), employees in the US are now connecting their compensation to their happiness at work. The report, Job Satisfaction and Engagement: The Road to Economic Recovery, revealed that when asked what was very important to them, 60 percent of the participants said compensation/pay, which made it the biggest contributor to job satisfaction. SHRM conducted the survey in 2013 and polled 600 randomly selected employees at small to large companies.

Compensation/pay held the top spot in the employee satisfaction survey before the recession hit, specifically between 2006 and 2007. During the years of the recession, compensation/pay held lower rankings. SHRM conducts this survey annually.

“Incomes have grown slowly since the recession, and that undoubtedly is having an impact on workers’ priorities and one explanation for the leap to the forefront by compensation,” said Evren Esen, director of SHRM’s Survey Research Center.

Other noteworthy data the survey showed include that four generations of workers ranked compensation/pay as either the top or second-choice aspect of job satisfaction and employees at all job levels, with the exception of executives, ranked compensation/pay as one of the top three contributors to overall job satisfaction.

For more information on how compensation affects job satisfaction, retention and recruiting, please join us for the 2014 Compensation and Benefits Conference at the McKimmon Center on August 14 and August 15. Specific presentations that will focus on employee compensation and salary data include:

The Future of Attraction, Retention and Motivation: How Compensation Fits into the Process Anne Ruddy – WorldatWork

Leverage Marketplace Trends When Making Decisions about Compensation and Benefits Strategies Molly Hegeman – CAI

Taking the Mystery Out of Salary Survey Data Sherry Hubbard-Bednasz – CAI

Proactive Uses of Compensation Analysis – An Employer’s Perspective Kaleigh Ferraro – CAI & Member Company Panel

Additional topics presenters will cover include: why performance management fails, driving engagement and reinforcing culture, building high-performing teams, controlling healthcare costs, wage and hour regulations, retirement planning, and more! Visit www.capital.org/compconf for detailed information about speakers and session topics. Register today!

Photo Source: Miran Rijavec Stan Dalone

 

 

Total Rewards and Business Strategy Are Not Aligned at Most Companies

Tuesday, June 10th, 2014

Expensive giftThe Total Rewards Survey developed by Mercer analyzes the practices companies use to align compensation, benefits, training and career development with today’s business priorities. Findings from the survey show that while more than half (56 percent) of organizations made a significant change to their total rewards strategy in the past three years, less than one-third (32 percent) said their total rewards and business strategies fully align.

Eighty-nine percent of organizations that participated in the survey ranked attracting and retaining the “right” talent as the most noteworthy challenge of their overall total rewards strategy. Additional challenges that were noted as very important included: collecting relevant market compensation data, keeping rewards affordable, communicating the value of rewards to employees, and ensuring pay for performance and performance differentiation.

From experiences with many clients, Mercer has highlighted several actions employers can put in place to address the holes between total rewards strategies and their business strategies:

“As companies focus on the cost of their talent, attracting and retaining the ‘right’ employees and differentiating rewards for top performers are challenges that can be made easier by incorporating the use of workforce analytics,” said Mary Ann Sardone, Partner in Mercer’s Talent practice and Regional Leader of the firm’s Rewards segment.

“Additionally, incorporating offerings such as career development and work/life balance initiatives into total rewards strategies caters to the needs of [employees] in the workplace.”

Leading the list of ways to enrich the employee experience in other ways than pay is giving employees the ability to make a difference in their job functions. Other contenders on the list were career progression, healthy living/wellness and recognition.

For additional information on recent trends and developments in total rewards strategy, including an in-depth look at what North Carolina employers are doing, please join us for the 2014 Compensation and Benefits Conference on August 14 and August 15 at Raleigh’s McKimmon Center.

This year’s keynote presenters and presentations include:

The Future of Attraction, Retention and Motivation: How Compensation Fits into the Process Anne Ruddy – WorldatWork

Green Goldfish – 15 Ways to Drive Engagement & Reinforce Culture Stan Phelps – 9 INCH marketing

What Would Healthcare Look Like If Getting It at the Lowest Cost Was Your Key Priority? Skip Woody – Hill, Chesson & Woody Employee Benefit Services

Leverage Marketplace Trends When Making Decisions about Compensation and Benefits Strategies Molly Hegeman – CAI

Additional topics that speakers will cover at the conference include: how compensation affects retention, the future of healthcare cost, driving employee engagement, analysis of the latest market data in total rewards, building high-performing teams, and understanding survey data.

For more information on conference speakers and topics, please visit www.capital.org/compconf.

American Workers Are More Interested in Money Than Time

Tuesday, April 29th, 2014

money over timeA recent survey from national finance recruitment firm Accounting Principals indicates that money is more important than time for most Americans. More than 1,000 adults participated in the survey that the finance firm conducted from January 17 to January 24 in 2014.

According to the survey results, 79 percent of working Americans would prefer a 5 percent raise instead of an extra week of vacation. Of the respondents, only 20 percent preferred the extra week. Statistics from the survey show that income level and seniority within a company does not make a difference when it comes to the participants’ preferences.

Revelations from the survey show that Americans can’t afford to shorten their work schedule if that means taking a pay cut. Eighty-five percent of respondents wouldn’t give up any of their salary for their workday to be shortened by one hour each day. Half of the participants who said they wouldn’t give up any of their salary report not doing so because they can’t afford to do so.

How American workers use their spare time was also analyzed for Accounting Principals’ survey. When participants do have time off, 48 percent choose to spend time with their family while 45 percent use the time to run errands. Fitness is also a priority for American workers. One-third of survey respondents chose to go to the gym if they were given an extra hour each day. Additional activities Americans would choose to do if they had an extra hour include sleeping/napping, watching TV and going to happy hour.

Although the survey shows that Americans value money over time, many employers are not able to give bonuses or raises for the year. Money is not always the reason why employees stay at a company either. Employers can provide their workers with several valuable perks that recognize and reward their contributions, make their work life and home life easier, or help them stay on track with their career goals.

Below are some blogs to help you reward and motivate your staff with or without money, check them out:

In this video blog, CAI’s Vice President of Membership, Doug Blizzard, explains how making praise a priority, helps employee morale and motivation soar — http://blog.capital.org/what-is-the-best-employee-reward/ .

You can find 19 easy ways to recognize and reward employees at no or low cost to the employer in this blog — http://blog.capital.org/19-low-cost-ways-to-recognize-employee-achievements/ .

Doug Blizzard encourages employers to not make the common mistakes of overlooking or devaluing the importance of pay to employees’ motivation in this video blog — http://blog.capital.org/are-you-paying-your-employees-enough-money/.

Looking to build a positive employer-employee relationship at your organization? Review the four tips on this blog to achieve your amicable goal — http://blog.capital.org/4-steps-for-building-positive-employer-employee-relationships/.

Photo Source: Jay Sumlin

Attract Candidates and Retain Employees with Your Total Rewards Program

Thursday, July 26th, 2012

A total rewards program refers to all the tools your company uses to attract, engage and retain employees, as well as recruit and secure talented job candidates. When selecting their future employer or deciding whether to stay or leave a company, workers evaluate the total rewards their company offers them. WorldatWork suggests that there are five elements that make up a total rewards program: compensation, benefits, work-life initiatives, performance and recognition initiatives, and development and career opportunities. A solid total rewards strategy combines the five elements to create a workplace environment that maximizes employee engagement.

Creating an appealing program will increase morale and job satisfaction, as well as improve overall staff performance. Here are some items to keep in mind when planning your total rewards program:

Your Employees Are Unique

Carefully analyze the different staff members who make up your organization. No two employees believe in the same values or partake in the same activities. Be sure your total rewards program takes employee differences into consideration. Create a culture that allows several types of people and personalities to grow and enjoy success.

Educate Your Workforce

As an employer, you are responsible for communicating to your staff the rewards that your company provides. If your employees receive higher than average compensation or your wellness program saves staffers money, make sure they know. It is up to your company to communicate the attractive aspects of your organization. Frequently remind employees of the benefits that you offer so they’ll have a reason to stay loyal and perform better.

Emphasize Your Appreciation

Employees are more likely to stay with organizations that show them that their time and efforts have not gone unnoticed. Use your total rewards program to highlight how important your staff members are to your company. Include meaningful ways to recognize and reward employees who turn in stellar work. Make sure professional development opportunities and other tasks to help your staff reach success comprise part of your total rewards strategy. Show them you care so they won’t want to leave.

CAI’s 2012 Compensation and Benefits Conference will feature additional tactics to craft an enticing total rewards program for your workforce. The conference will also cover several topics that are imperative for attracting, retaining and engaging your employees, including flexible scheduling and helping different generations plan for retirement. In addition to the knowledge you’ll gain by attending, you’ll have the opportunity to network with more than 150 HR professionals. Register for the conference today: www.capital.org/compconf.

Photo Source: robertstinnett