Posts Tagged ‘Company Brand’

Guarantee A Great Cultural Fit With These 5 Interview Questions

Thursday, December 17th, 2015

Business meeting.

Tom Sheehan, CAI’s HR Business Partner, shares the questions you should be asking your candidates to gauge whether they will be a strong cultural match for your business.

According to a study by Leadership IQ, 46% of newly-hired employees failed within 18 months, and contrary to popular belief only 11% failed due to technical skills.   The majority of the 20,000 new hires tracked in this study failed for interpersonal/fit issues.  As I once heard it put, “you’re hired for what you know and fired for who you are.”

As a result, it’s absolutely critical that all managers in your organization, especially anyone involved with interviewing potential employees, have a good grasp of your company’s culture and refer back to it throughout the hiring process.  HR leaders need to ensure that all leaders understand and can articulate the founding principles of your culture, and that they know how to effectively test for these principles when they are interviewing candidates. It’s also important to include culture-based questions in every interview round. Here are five interview questions that should help assess ‘culture fit:’

1. What was the most frustrating thing about working at your last company?

If the candidate expresses frustration about the amount of corporate email, daily meetings, or anything else that your company also has, you can probably assume this candidate isn’t a good fit for your company.

2. Describe your ideal work environment. What is the single most important factor that must be present for you to be successful at your job?

Personal work environment preferences can vary greatly. Some people like a set schedule while others require a great deal of scheduling flexibility. Some don’t mind travel while others do not want any travel at all. Some employees like working for a smaller more personal company while others prefer being part of a larger organization.

3. What is your preferred work style: alone or part of a team? If you could divide your work time, what percentage would you assign to each?

Most jobs are a mixture of working alone and working on a team. However, the mix can vary widely. Knowing if a person prefers working alone most of the time is critical in a job where most of the work is done as a team. The opposite is also true.

4. What characteristics would you ideally want to have in a boss? Describe the management style that brings out your best work.

Some job candidates have a strong preference in the kind of manager they like to work with and the ones they don’t. For example, trying to fit an autocratic manager with an employee who likes a democratic style can be a recipe for a difficult working relationship.

5. When working in a team, describe the role you most often play? How would your co-workers describe the role you play on the team?

Most people have a preferred role when it comes to being a part of a team. It might be as leader, a coordinator, or an implementer. It is good to know what their preference is and if they are able to adapt their approach.

For any further help with this subject, or any talent management issues, please don’t hesitate to contact a member of CAI’s Advice and Resolution team at 919‑878‑9222 or 336‑668‑7746.

What other interview questions have worked to assess a great cultural fit for you? Please let us know in the comments!

Recruiting The Best and Brightest

Tuesday, April 5th, 2011

Employees are the framework for all organizations, and represent a driving force behind the success or failure of a company. As one of the key elements for long-term success, it’s critical that companies place focus on the hiring process, and strive to recruit the most intelligent, motivated and versatile employees available.

How can companies position themselves to not only recruit employees, but attract top talent?

Evaluate Current Processes

First, evaluate the current selection process your organization has in place. Because of convenience, countless job seekers will come through newspaper ads and website postings, but by using additional outlets (social media, executive staffing firms, industry professional associations, conferences and online boards) a new kind of job candidate can be uncovered. By extending your network pool, you can build relationships, and much can be said about hiring a person whose character you know, instead of hiring solely on Internet credentials.

Provide Thorough Job Descriptions

Once you are recruiting within the correct market, make sure that your company job descriptions are clearly outlined. A detailed description of requirements and responsibilities is imperative, as it’s a way for you to label and define the expectations of future candidates. Don’t wait until the interview process to discover your interviewee doesn’t meet the basic qualifications. If you allow the job description to cover basic requirements, your interview process will reveal the candidate whose skills stand out above the rest.

Keep an Eye on Talent

To recruit the best and brightest, employers must always keep an eye open for top talent. Firms with exceptional recruiting results always monitor potential applicants, whether hiring or not. Through continuous evaluation of the candidate pool, organizations have a better idea of who to select when the time comes. By keeping a running list of candidates, you can keep a watch over top talent and avoid hiring at the last minute.

Monitor your Company Brand

An important piece of the puzzle that is often overlooked is to monitor your company brand. What people say outside of the company walls matters immensely. The overall public perception of your organization will be a leading determinant for many candidates. Outside of salary and job growth, employees want to be part of a company whose culture is respected and valued. Treat your current staff well, as they will be your spokespersons to others about what makes your organization great.

For additional information about recruiting, please call a member of CAI’s Advice and Counsel team at (919) 878-9222 or (336) 668-7746.

Photo Source: Argonne National Laboratory