Posts Tagged ‘CareerBuilder’

Using Effective Recruiting Sources

Thursday, January 28th, 2016

sources

In today’s post, Advice and Resolution team member Renee’ Watkins shares the findings of a CareerBuilder survey that reveals where employers should be wisely spending their resources on recruiting sources.

According to a CareerBuilder survey of over 1,600 of their clients, job candidates, on average, use eighteen (18) sources when looking for a new job.  Understanding which of these sources are used most often will give employers insight as to where to invest their recruiting time on job posting sources.

Most companies typically do the same things when it comes to getting the word out regarding job openings.  There are employee referrals, internal databases, job boards, etc.  No secrets or surprises here.  So, which sources are having the most success?

Forty-three percent (43%) of those surveyed find the most success posting on Job Boards.  Thirty-two percent (32%) find the most success by posting on Career Sites. Seven percent (7%) have more successful hires coming from Employee Referrals and two percent (2%) are more successful recruiting candidates through an Agency.  Other sources combined to make up the remaining 16%.

However, according to Leadership IQ’s latest research, the most successful companies are finding their best people in what they call “The Underground Job Market” through employee referrals and networking.

As an employer, now that you have this information, what can you learn from it?  In order to ensure the best possible formula for recruiting success, an organization must have a multi-faceted strategy for sourcing candidates.  An internal database, or pool, of qualified candidates you have already spoken with and vetted is one of your best sources.

However, you should also make sure you post openings on targeted job boards and career sites.  This will attract candidates for your current opening. Establish an employee referral program which rewards employees for finding and recruiting qualified candidates for an opening.  This will encourage participation and engagement from your existing employees, as well as serve to preserve your corporate culture.  People are prone to associate with and recruit people who they are most compatible with.

A single approach to recruiting is not enough to make you successful.  There will be specialty jobs which require very targeted approaches, including perhaps the support of an agency.   There will also be jobs requiring a certain level of soft skills in addition to education and experience.  For these, you may find yourself “smiling-and-dialing” to locate the right candidate.

Lastly, there are two important considerations to remember when putting these strategies to use.  The first is, a recruiting technology is only as good as the people who use them.  Make sure your team is well-trained on getting the most use out of career sites and job boards.  As with any technology, if you do not use it correctly, it will not work for you.  The second thing to remember is to accurately measure your source for each hire.  These statistics will tell you and your management, which strategies are working well and help to drive budgets for investing deeper in certain strategies.

Should you need assistance developing a new approach or validating your existing one, please contact Tom Sheehan on our Advice & Resolution team at (919) 878-9222 or tom.sheehan@capital.org.

 

Most Bizarre Excuses for Calling in Sick Revealed in CareerBuilder Survey

Thursday, November 12th, 2015

Whether it’s to take a quick vacation, lay in bed all day, or run errands around town, it appears more workers are calling in to take a sick day this year than last. A new survey of more than 2,300 HR managers and 3,300 employees, conducted by Harris Poll on behalf of Career Builder, has found that 38 percent of employees have called in sick when they actually feel well, up from last year’s 28 percent.

So what was the excuse as to why these employees couldn’t ‘make it into work’? Most of them run the gamut of normalcy, with 27 percent citing a doctor’s appointment as their reason, 21 percent saying they needed to catch up on sleep, and 12 percent blaming bad weather.

A few excuses, however, stand out among the rest.

When asked what the strangest excuse they had heard from employees calling in sick, managers listed the following unlikely tales:

  • Employee claimed his grandmother poisoned him with ham
  • Employee was stuck under the bed
  • Employee said the universe was telling him to take the day off
  • Employee poked herself in the eye while combing her hair
  • Employee was going to the beach because her doctor said she needed more Vitamin D

These employees’ stories certainly raise a few eyebrows, including those of their managers. Of the managers polled in the study, 33 percent admitted to checking in to see if an employee was telling the truth after calling in sick. So how did they investigate these tall tales? By going online.

Social media leaves trails of bread crumbs that are quite easy to track, and it appears employers are making use of it to ensure their employees are being honest.

According to the survey, 33 percent of managers have caught their employees lying about being sick by checking their social media accounts. Of that share of managers, 26 percent fired the employee for their dishonesty.

Whether it’s finding a photo on Facebook of an employee lounging on the beach while he claimed to be at the doctor’s office getting medicine for a bad cold, or tracking down an employee’s Tweets about the rock music festival she attended the day she maintains to have had a pounding migraine, social media is making it easier than ever to ensure employees are making honest use of their sick days.

The study found that 22 percent of employers have fired an employee this year for calling in sick with a fake excuse, up from last year’s 18 percent.

While it is important to respect your employees’ privacy, it’s also imperative that employers can determine whether their employees are being honest with them. Managers shouldn’t be investigating their employees’ every move, but would ultimately be doing themselves and their business a disservice by letting some of these more bizarre excuses for skipping out on work slip out from under their radar.

To read more about the survey, click here. For any further questions about what steps your business can take to protect itself from possible employee dishonesty regarding sick days, please give our Advice and Resolution Team a call at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746.

The Million Dollar Lie

Thursday, April 30th, 2015

The following post is from CAI’s Kevin von der Lippe. He serves as CAI’s private investigator and leads the company’s Background Checking department.

Kevin von der Lippe, Private Investigator

Kevin von der Lippe, Private Investigator

Laszlo Bock, the Senior Vice President of HR at Google, recently caused a stir with his two-part blog post on Linkedin® in which he exposed the ugly truth about the overwhelming number of resume mistakes that flood his desk. Bock estimates that Google accumulates more than 50,000 applicant resumes in a single week, and he personally guarantees that more than half of all resumes have at least 1 mistake on them.  He goes on to discuss the top 5 pitfalls that otherwise remarkable job candidates make on their resumes that lead to a lose-lose situation for both the candidate and the employer. The most notorious of these infractions?  Lies.

For some reason, applicants and sometimes hiring managers fail to understand that the entire point of conducting a background check is to independently verify the information provided by the job seeker.  Bock says it breaks his heart when he finds an applicant that lied on the resume.  Last year, a Careerbuilder® survey found that 58% of employers have caught an applicant lying on their resume. I can tell you from personal experience that CAI’s background checking department commonly finds evidence of lying during the 90,000 or so background checks we conduct each year.

Lying about one’s education seems to top the list of transgressions, but fudging dates of employment and being dishonest about prior convictions are also top contenders. Interestingly, a recent court case in Pennsylvania ruled that a company could hold an applicant accountable for not providing an honest answer regarding criminal records on job applications, even when the crimes were not specifically job related.

Bock suggests in his post that you should use his company’s search engine to do a quick search for “CEO fired for lying on resume.”   Imagine climbing the corporate ladder for 15 years until you finally become CEO, only to have your dream turn to horror as you’re fired for a lie you made on your resume 15 years ago.  You would be surprised how often this scenario occurs, and it is continues thanks in part to failed or insufficient background checks.

And let’s not forget, the stakes are high for employers too! The average settlement of a negligent hiring lawsuit is nearly $1 million.  Don’t be a statistic!  Make sure you are conducting thorough background checks on prospective employees. Let CAI’s detective agency help you sort through your applicant’s statements, and make sure you are hiring the right person with the skill set you need.

If you have questions about our background checking services, or how CAI can help you remain in compliance with the federal laws related to background screening, you can call me at 336 -899-1150 or email at kevin.vonderlippe@capital.org.

Survey Reveals Majority of Employers in Favor of Raising the Minimum Wage

Thursday, October 23rd, 2014

minimum wageRaising the minimum wage is one of the country’s top socioeconomic and political issues. Voters at large have shown support for minimum wage increases according to recent polls. A new survey from CareerBuilder indicates that many businesses are also in support of raising the minimum wage.

The survey reveals that 62 percent of employers who participated think the minimum wage in their state should increase. Fifty-eight percent of those participants are senior leaders at their companies.  Harris Poll conducted the survey on behalf of CareerBuilder from May 13 to June 6 of 2014. The survey includes a sample of 2,188 full-time hiring and human resource managers and 3,372 full-time workers in the private sector across industries and company sizes.

When asked what a fair minimum wage would look like, only 7 percent of participants think a minimum wage of $15 per hour or more would be fair. Check out how the other participants answered:

  • $7.25 per hour (current federal minimum): 8 percent
  • $8.00 or $9.00 per hour: 29 percent
  • $10.00 per hour: 29 percent
  • $11.00-$14.00 per hour: 19 percent
  • $15.00 or more per hour: 7 percent
  • No set minimum wage: 9 percent

When asked why the minimum wage should increase, employers in favor of an increase gave business-related reasons for the support. A majority of the supporters say a higher minimum wage helps the economy and company retention. Additional reasons are below:

  • It can improve the standard of living: 74 percent
  • It can have a positive effect on employee retention: 58 percent
  • It can help bolster economy: 55 percent
  • It can increase consumer spending: 53 percent
  • Employees may be more productive/deliver higher quality work: 48 percent
  • It can afford workers the opportunity to pursue more training or education: 39 percent

The employers who do not support an increase highlight the negative effects an increase may have on their business. See below for those reasons:

  • It can cause employers to hire less people: 66 percent
  • It can cause issues for small businesses struggling to get by: 65 percent
  • It can cause hikes in prices to offset labor costs: 62 percent
  • It can mean potential layoffs: 50 percent
  • It can lead to increased use of automation as a replacement for workers: 32 percent
  • Wages for higher-level workers may suffer and create retention issues: 29 percent

The survey showed that 27 percent of employers are hiring minimum wage workers in 2015. Forty-five percent of these employers are hiring more minimum wage workers than they did pre-recession.

An interesting statistic the study uncovered is that companies currently hiring for minimum wage positions are more likely to support a minimum wage increase than those who are not by an 11-point margin– 70 percent versus  59 percent.

Photo Source: Maryland GovPics

 

 

 

 

Choose Wisely to Avoid the Cost of a Bad Hire

Tuesday, June 12th, 2012

There are several costs associated with hiring a new employee. Money is spent hiring a recruiter, advertising the new position, reimbursing travel expenses and training the new staff member. Not only are financial resources used, but employers spend an ample amount of time with job candidates and new hires. Time is spent interviewing, onboarding and educating the new team member. When considering all the effort invested in one employee, uncovering that she’s a bad hire can be devastating.

CareerBuilder’s recent survey on costs related to bad hires indicates that 65 percent of the participating US hiring managers said that their bad hiring decision cost their company $25,000 to $50,000. Financial losses are easy to spot, but bad hires can also lower productivity and impact their coworkers negatively. Although you can’t prevent a bad hire 100 percent of the time, you can take several steps to ensure a candidate is a good fit for your job opening. Use the tips below to avoid a poor hiring decision:

Know the Job

Do you know why you have a vacancy at your company, and why it hasn’t been filled yet? If your opening isn’t new, take some time to thoroughly understand the requirements and skills needed to fill the position. Review what made past employees successful in the position and what made them ultimately leave. If there wasn’t much success, evaluate what you can do to help reduce turnover.

Nail the Interview

Evaluate your company’s role and responsibility during the interview process. Do you have good interviewers that are excellent time keepers and make job candidates feel welcomed? Do you utilize interview questions that will paint a picture of what the candidate did at his previous job? Do you incorporate questions that will give the candidate different scenarios of what he can expect from his new job? Planning for well-thought-out behavioral interview questions is a must.

Check and then Double Check

Before setting a start date for your new employee, make sure all of your company’s pre-requisites for new hires are completed. Perform a background check to verify his employment and criminal history, call his references to confirm his past work performance and experience, and have him complete an assessment to further demonstrate job fit.

Following the three tips above should help you identify high-performing talent and avoid making a costly hiring mistake. CAI offers services to help you increase your chances of selecting a great hire. Contact Molly Hegeman at 919-878-9222 or http://j.mp/cai-a for more information about recruiting and assessments.  Contact Kevin von der Lippe at 336-668-7746 or www.capital.org/vea for questions regarding background checking and reference services.

Photo Source: hawken king