Posts Tagged ‘career growth’

Key Qualities for Promotion to Management

Tuesday, March 29th, 2011

There are two types of employees – those who view their work as a job and those who view their work as a component of a long-term career. Both professional types can excel in performance, but for employees who are career motivated, operating as a subordinate is not enough.

For the employee seeking to climb the company ladder, it’s important to understand the qualities companies seek, and what can currently be done to assist in career advancement. Consider the following as you strive to claim your seat in management.

Showcasing your worth –The benefits of internal promotions are obvious to the individual – increased finances, added respect from company peers and a voice that carries a greater influence and reach, but how does the company benefit from your advancement? To join the management team, your value needs to be recognized. Whether it’s generating additional revenue, cutting cost or bringing new insight, the benefit needs to be clear.

Solid working habits – Members of the management team share common characteristics of dependability and decision-making. Can you do what you say you’re going to do, when you say you’re going to do it? In moments of challenge, when answers need to be received, can you call the shots? It’s the reliability that companies count on from management that results in success.

Level of efficiency – Companies value the employee who is time-oriented. Because the speed at which you operate is fundamental, form a habit of completing work in an efficient manner. Understand the difference between critical assignments and those that can be put on hold. A majority of CEOs agree that employees on track for advancement have a keen ability to establish priorities and sift through the essentials.

Teaching abilities – An essential quality of management is that the person’s level of expertise can be relayed and transferred to other employees. You can perform well, but to manage, you need to be able to teach, support staff, communicate information and share knowledge clearly for others to follow.

Avoid silence – You may be the best person to ever fill your job, but if no one knows about your achievements, how will your work ever be recognized? In the business world, it helps to occasionally “toot your own horn.” Give updates on your success to supervisors, find a mentor within the company that can spread your praises, but most importantly, make your voice heard.

A management role is not appropriate for all individuals. If you’d like to be a manager, make it a point to concentrate on your present performance. Those currently sitting at the table are continuously evaluating employees for when the team is ready for expansion. What you are doing right now will be the leading factor in the decision process six months down the road.

For additional information, please call a member of CAI’s Advice and Counsel team at (919) 878-9222 or (336) 668-7746.

Photo source: half-blood prince

Top 10 Reasons Employees Stay with an Organization

Tuesday, March 15th, 2011

If employee retention is a focus area for your organization, you may want to consider asking this question during the discussion phase when giving your next employee performance review:

“What would it take for you to leave?”

In fact, you may want to do it sooner.  You might be very surprised at the responses you hear. Many of your employees will not be able to think of a reason they would leave, which says a lot about your organization.  And those that do respond with reasons they would consider leaving your company provide valuable insight into how you can make improvements to retain your most valued employees.

Why wait until an exit interview to determine why an employee decided to leave? Engage your good performers when the opportunity presents itself and find out what might cause them to leave before they really do leave.

Beverly Kaye and Sharon Jordan-Evans surveyed more than 17,000 employees with various organizations for their book Love ‘em or Lose ‘em about reasons why employees stay with an organization. Below are the top 10 reasons from their survey:

  1. Exciting work and challenge
  2. Career growth, learning and development
  3. Working with great people
  4. Fair pay
  5. Supportive management/good boss
  6. Being recognized, valued and respected
  7. Benefits
  8. Meaningful work and making a difference
  9. Pride in the organization, its mission and its products
  10. Great work environment and culture

It’s often assumed that pay is the chief lure for an employee to jump ship.  However, that is clearly not the case.  Even if you’ve had to freeze salaries over the past couple of years, if you can provide your employees with challenging work, give them the opportunity to learn and grow, and have created a work environment of support and camaraderie, you have a very good chance of being able to retain your top performers.

But, of course, the best way to find out where you stand is by asking your employees directly.  Take some time to find out from your employees why they stay with your organization and, more importantly, why they might leave. If you have questions regarding employee retention, please contact a member of CAI’s Advice and Counsel team at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746.

Photo Source: Shuttleworth Foundation