Posts Tagged ‘career builder’

First Impressions Vital to Candidate Experience and the Bottom Line

Tuesday, October 13th, 2015
Renee' Watkins, HR Advisor

Renee’ Watkins, HR Advisor

In today’s post, Advice and Resolution team member Renee’ Watkins shares the importance of creating a strong candidate experience and its positive impact on the health of your business.

The overall experience a candidate encounters during the interview process is very important to securing the candidate’s continued interest in your organization.   As competition for top talent continues to grow, and candidate expectations of potential employers expand, it is vital to make the best first impression possible.

According to a new CareerBuilder study, candidates who are turned off by a bad interview experience could go so far as to stop purchasing products or services provided by your company and may tell their family and friends to do the same.  According to the study of 5,000 workers and 2,000 hiring managers, candidate expectations are on the rise.

Here are a few specifics from the study:

The Bottom Line – A negative hiring experience can actually affect your bottom line.  Although eighty-two percent (82%) of employers felt there would be no negative impact to their bottom line as a result of a bad hiring experience,  58% of candidates indicated they would be less likely to buy from a company after a bad hiring experience. Sixty-nine percent (69%) of candidates said they would be more likely to buy from a company after a positive interview in which they were treated with respect.

Networking – According to the study, the average candidate researches an organization using as many as eighteen (18) resources during their job search.  Job boards, social networking sites, and online referrals are just a few of those resources.  Fifty-eight percent (58%) of employers fail to track how candidates learn about a position or how they researched the organization.  As a result, these employers miss a real opportunity to connect with candidates who are actively searching for jobs.

The “Black Hole” – The absolute worst thing an employer can do after interviewing an application is failure to follow up.  Candidates would prefer bad news over none at all.  Unfortunately, 52% of employers say they respond to less than half of their applicants, while 84% of today’s candidates expect a personal email response from their application, even if the answer is negative.  Do not let your candidate applications fall into the “Black Hole.”

Communication – Today’s technology makes it all too simple to send out a quick note via email to an applicant who has been through the interview process.  According to the study 41% of job applicants expect to be notified after the interview process if they were not chosen for the job opening. Seventy-three (73%) said they were never notified of anything post-interview.

KISS – We have all heard of the KISS method.  Keeping it simple is still the best way to keep candidates engaged in the hiring process.  A complicated application process can cause a candidate to lose interest and move on to another company they may be interested in.  Forty percent (40%) of applicants complain the hiring process has  become to difficult and 57% complain the process is too automated and lacks a personal touch.

Make Me An Offer – Making a good first impression during the hiring process can produce other benefits as well for the organization.  Seventy-seven percent (77%) of candidates surveyed said they would accept an offer 5% lower than their expectations if the interview process went well and left them with a good impression of the company.  Eighty-three percent (83%) said they would accept 5% less if the company had a great reputation as an employer.

Companies that have a strong reputation for an excellent hiring process and making a great first impression have a definite advantage.  Fifty-two percent (52%) of employers surveyed admit they do not have such a reputation, giving the other 48% the edge in acquiring top talent.

If you have any further questions regarding how you can develop or improve upon your existing talent acquisition process, please call our Advice and Resolution team today at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746.

Is the Nine to Five Dying?

Tuesday, September 8th, 2015

recruitingIs the traditional nine-to-five work schedule a thing of the past? It appears a lot of workers seem to think so.  A recent CareerBuilder survey of more than 1,000 IT, financial services, sales, and business workers reveals 63 percent of workers believe the traditional nine-to-five model is an “outdated concept.”

The survey, which was conducted online by Harris Poll from May 14 to June 3, shows how a large share of today’s workers are operating under a much more flexible work schedule than in the past.

And while many bosses may fear the loss of the traditional work frame, they need not panic just yet. While it is true that many employees no longer see the point of coming into the office five days a week, that doesn’t necessarily mean employees have lost interest in their work.

“With improvements in technology that enable employees to check in at any time, from anywhere, it makes sense to allow employees to work outside the traditional nine-to-five schedule,” said Rosemary Haefner, Chief HR Officer of CareerBuilder.

With this ability to access their work documents, calendars, and emails remotely, many of today’s workers see little to no point in sitting behind an office desk to complete their work.

In fact, 50 percent of those surveyed say they “check or respond to work emails outside of work” and nearly 40 percent say they continue to work outside of office hours.

While businesses obviously cannot allow the nine-to-five model to dissolve completely, this growing trend reflects the clear need for more flexibility within employees’ schedules.

“Moving away from a nine-to-five work week may not be possible for some companies (yet), but if done right, allowing employees more freedom and flexibility with their schedules can boost productivity,” said Haefner.

While the long-term effects of moving away from the traditional workweek remain to be seen, there does seem to be an attractive set of benefits to offering employees greater workplace flexibility:

  • Improved sense of loyalty: Employees are likely to be more attached and committed to a workplace that takes their needs for flexibility into consideration, thus resulting in
  • Greater retention: Employees will be more likely to stay in their positions if they feel content and satisfied with the work schedule
  • Heightened morale: Employees will feel more engaged and fulfilled with their work when they are working with a schedule that best suits their needs
  • Around the clock inspiration: Rather than having an employee simply turn “off” of work at 5 o’clock, giving your employees a flexible schedule will allow them to remain open to new ideas and inspiration at all hours of the day.

The nine-to-five isn’t going to disappear any time soon, but it will likely begin to change little by little to match today’s changing technological landscape. The CareerBuilder survey is beginning to show us those little changes, and businesses need to be prepared to adapt to meet them.  With the popularity of the traditional workweek waning and the benefits of workplace flexibility becoming more apparent, businesses may need to “get with the times” before losing out on top talent to more accommodating firms.

If you have any questions about how you can create a more flexible workplace within your company, please call our Advice and Resolution team today at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746.