Posts Tagged ‘benefits’

Time to Break the Link?

Tuesday, October 18th, 2016

Conventional wisdom often creates a strong linkage between performance evaluation ratings and compensation. On its face, this link seems completely appropriate. After all, it is only natural for people to think that stronger performance deserves more pay, weaker performance less.

However, a performance / compensation model with this direct link has a number of inherent downsides. First, many managers “force fit” employee rankings into desired compensation distributions in order maintain budget.  This practice discredits the performance system, breeds cynicism, and demotivates employees.performance-ratings

Another unwanted side effect of a direct linkage between performance rating and compensation is that many employees worry excessively about the pay implications related to the differences in ratings. As a consequence, they become fixated on their rating and drown out any discussion about developmental needs.

Focusing less on the link itself between performance and compensation allows companies to worry less about tracking and rating, and the consequences thereof, and more about building capabilities and inspiring employees to stretch their skills and aptitudes.  Now, to be clear, I am not suggesting that compensation has no linkage with performance. I simply believe that the focus on the immediate linkage, at the time of the review, has several drawbacks that take away from the intended outcome of the performance review process and discussion.

Here is the rub: Since only a relatively few employees are truly standouts, (5-10%, perhaps 15%) why risk demotivating the broad majority of your employee base by focusing almost exclusively on the linkage between pay and performance.

Even General Electric, a long time proponent of the performance – pay linkage model and all the related processes and templates that go with it, is currently reinventing itself in this arena.  They are considering options ranging from dispensing with the entire model to a more gradual shift over time. They also understand that they must equip their managers with new tools and methods to motivate and reward employees.

The growing need for companies to inspire and motivate performance makes it critical to create managers and supervisors who are better coaches. Without great and frequent coaching, it’s difficult to set goals flexibly and often, to help employees stretch their jobs, or to give people greater responsibility and autonomy while demanding more expertise and judgment from them.

If you’re rethinking your organization’s performance management process, you don’t have to go it alone. Contact CAI’s Advice & Resolution team to help you and your leadership team evaluate alternative models and coach you through making a change.



Tom Sheehan brings 20+ years of extensive, broad based strategic, tactical and practical HR experience to CAI’s Advice & Resolution team.  He advises HR and other business leaders on talent management, organizational effectiveness, employee engagement, M&A’s, and employee relations.

Think Beyond Bonuses: Use Low Cost/High Impact Benefits to Maintain a Highly Engaged Workforce

Thursday, October 13th, 2016

As we prepare for the Overtime Rule (effective December 1) and continue to address increasing cost of insurance, we may feel the financial impact and strain on the budget.  It can be hard for companies to provide benefits to maintain employee engagement and stay competitive in the workplace with limited spending available in the budget.

I know that as employers, we recognize that a key motivator, or perhaps the number one motivator for many employees is compensation – the salary that is earned each week.  We work to make money and provide for our families and or achieve other goals.  But don’t underestimate the power of low cost benefits. employee-engagement

When I planned to move to CAI from my previous job in Banking, one of my biggest factors in finding a good employer was one that had a similar family oriented culture and flexible schedule. I have a young child and being able to have time if he is sick, to participate in his events, or work from home when needed was a key decision maker for me. CAI is an very employee-friendly organization that offers many low-cost perks: unlimited personal time, ability to work from home if needed, supplement to a wellness program of my choice, and continuing education classes (so I can maintain my certification).  The new CAI office in Raleigh further establishes CAI’s commitment to creating a great culture for employees. There are free snacks/drinks (including healthy choices like fruit and flavored water), several “We Spaces” that allow employees to move from their traditional desk spaces if they need a break or want to work in a different location for a bit, a lactation/meditation room, and several nice outdoor spaces for breaks and lunch.

Here are some other creative, low-cost ways that you can provide benefits to your employees:

  • Community Service/Volunteer Days: Allow your employees to have a couple of paid days per year to spend giving back to the community. Employees can participate in events such as Habitat for Humanity or Big Brother/Big Sister Program, working at a soup kitchen, or helping with Special Olympics. As an employer you could put requirements on the process for requesting the time away (to ensure coverage and ensure it is a legitimate request) and your participation will help build relationships in the community as a good steward.


  • Flexible Schedules/Time Away: Not all companies can provide a flexible workplace due to customer/production needs. If your culture would allow for a flexible schedule or time away, give it a try. You can build in parameters to ensure compliance and avoid abuse while creating an environment that communicates a trusting relationship: you trust that the employee will get the work done and take time as needed without abusing the privilege. Some employers utilize a seasonal “summer schedule” that allows employees to take advantage of the longer day light hours.


  • Employee discounts on company products or services. Does your company offer a product or service that they could give employees at a discount? We have companies that manufacture pocket books that allow employees to purchase at a discount, hotels that offer family/friend rates, and food processing companies that allow employees to have a certain number of free products per week worked.


  • Education Assistance: Providing a small fund for educational assistance or student loan repayment can go a long way. You can also tie in parameters to ensure that the employees don’t get the assistance and leave – have them sign a reimbursement form acknowledging that they will repay the company at a certain rate if they leave within a predetermined amount of time. Providing educational assistance will allow your employees to grow and become more valuable.


  • Wellness Programs: Wellness programs can range from super low cost to expensive. You can run a wellness program on a low budget by doing small walking challenges (have a couple small prizes like gift cards for winner), a newsletter outlining healthy eating/lifestyle tips (ask your employees to contribute) or a small ‘match’ on an employee’s choice of wellness program (Weight Watchers, Yoga, Gym Membership). Contributing to a wellness program will tie directly in to a healthier and happier work staff (and hopefully lower insurance/work injury claims).


  • Casual Dress Days: Do you know how much wearing a pair of jeans matters to your employees? Seriously, allowing employees a casual day once a week will be LIFE CHANGING for your staff. Of course you can require that the dress code still meet requirements of the business and maintain the professional image for customers.


  • Company Swag: I am sure you have (or can get your hands on) some logo items at a cheap cost. Employees love to have a water bottle, t-shirt, pens or small lunch container with their company logo. Double bonus: free advertising!


  • Partnerships with Other Companies: Do you have a local business that you could partner with to offer employee discounts? Maybe there is a tire shop up the road that will offer a 10% discount to employees of your company or a local restaurant that will provide a discounted lunch for specific days during the week.


  • Training: Show your employees that you value them and have a plan for their growth in the company. Sending an employee to a training class says that you have plans for them and are willing to invest in their talent and future with the company. As a member of CAI, there are many opportunities for cost-effective training and free webinars.

Overall creating a culture that values employees and puts emphasis on the employee’s work/life balance is a key to maintaining an engaged workforce and staying competitive with applicants.

Learn how CAI can help you improve performance and engagement in your workplace.

hinesley_emilyEmily’s primary area of focus is providing expert advice and support in the areas of employee relations and federal and state employment law compliance as a member of the Advice & Resolution team for CAI. Additionally, Emily advises business and HR leaders in operational and strategic human resources areas such as talent and performance management, employee engagement, and M&A’s. Emily has 10+ years of broad based HR business partnering experience centering around employee relations, compliance & regulatory employment issues, strategic and tactical human resources, and strong process improvement skills.


Survey Reveals NC Employers Are Finding Strategies to Contain Healthcare Costs in 2015 and Beyond

Tuesday, April 21st, 2015

The results of the 2014/2015 NC Healthcare Benefits & Cost Survey are officially in! Serving as the premier health plan benchmark survey for companies in North Carolina, employers in the state can use the data to help manage their employee benefits plan and see what other companies of similar size or industry are doing.

More than 600 organizations from across the state of North Carolina participated in this year’s survey. The majority of participating organizations are located in the Research Triangle region.

Here are some highlights from this year’s survey results:

  • employer individual contributionThe number of employers who provided data for a traditional plan only is 405. The number of employers who provided data for consumer driven health plans is 85. The number of employers that provided both traditional and consumer driven health plans is 144.
  • Seventy-two percent of employers are fully insured, 25.9 percent are self-funded and 1.9 percent of employers report other funding arrangements.
  • Employers with traditional plans reported an average original premium increase of 11.1 percent and an average final premium increase of 5.8 percent. Those with consumer driven health plans saw an initial increase of 10.1 percent and an average final premium increase of 5.6 percent.
  • employer family contributionUnder traditional plans, the average monthly healthcare premium for a family is $1,458.56 and for a single individual is $498.75. On average, employers cover 81 percent and 54 percent of individual and family premiums respectively.
  • To better understand what local employers are doing to navigate the rapidly changing healthcare landscape, the survey asked participants about their top three healthcare cost containment strategies that are currently being implemented or will be put in place. Fifty-eight percent of the 634 unique organizations participating provided an applicable response. The three most popular cost containment strategies include:
  1. All things wellness: encouraging wellness and a healthy lifestyle, establishing formal and informal wellness programs, health education and coaching, providing smoking cessation, etc.
  2. Plan Redesign: taking a close look at their plans and dissecting them, figuring out what is needed and what is not, shopping around for the best deal, opting for leaner plans, increasing the deductible and copays, etc.
  3. Healthcare Consumer Education: teaching employees about health plans and proper utilization, encouraging preventative/annual exams, discouraging emergency room visits or opting for urgent care first, etc.

Most benchmark surveys out today are based on national data with regional breakouts. Our 2014/2015 NC Healthcare Benefits & Cost Survey is unique in that CAI collects data specifically from North Carolina employers for use by North Carolina employers. The information found in this year’s survey results can help you see how your benefit plan design and premium costs compare to other local companies.

The NC Healthcare Benefits & Cost Survey is conducted annually by CAI, with design assistance provided by Hill, Chesson & Woody (HCW). The Employers Association (TEA) of Charlotte, North Carolina co-sponsored the 2014/2015 survey.  For more information on this survey and how to participate in our other surveys, please visit our survey page here.

Top 5 Resolutions For Maintaining A Strong Benefit Plan

Thursday, January 15th, 2015

The post below is a guest blog from Joy Binkley who serves as Principal, Health & Welfare Consultant for CAI’s employee benefits partner Hill, Chesson & Woody.

resolutionsYou may think New Year’s resolutions only apply to bettering yourself, but don’t forget about the health of your benefit plan! Follow these five resolutions for keeping your benefits strong:


  1. Look for new opportunities to communicate the value of your benefits. Many employers pull their employees together once a year to review their benefit offerings during the annual open enrollment.  Make a point to pick 2 or 3 other times a year to stress the benefits of your health plan.  For example, distribute a hidden paycheck, highlight one of your benefit offerings at a staff meeting or hold a Lunch & Learn event supported by one of carriers during the year.
  2. Test your plan for ACA and overall compliance.List all of the notices you are required to release each year.  Take inventory of all of your employee categories and know which ones are eligible for coverage under your plan.  Make certain you are able to access contracts and policies without difficulty.  Review your time recording structure and be assured it will assist you with the new 2015 reporting requirements.
  3. Develop a health and wellness calendar.Challenge your organization to engage in a health and wellness event once a month.  Select a small group of employees or form a committee to develop an activity or event each month to support.  These events can range from a lunch time walk, encouraging others to eat more fruits and vegetables or supporting a team effort at a local charity walk.  With a little forethought, these activities can be a great way to remind your employees that their health is important.
  4. Plan ahead; don’t wait until the last minute to review your plan options for 2015.Review how things are running with your current benefits mid-year and see if they are supporting your overall business objectives for the year. Are your benefits helping you retain and attract the right talent for your organization to succeed?  If not, what may you need to change or initiate to help you meet this goal.
  5. Look for ways to enhance your plan offerings.Employees are looking to their employers to offer them more choices in plans that may meet their unique needs.  The worksite benefit landscape has evolved a lot over the past few years.  Introducing new voluntary benefits are a great way to enhance your benefit portfolio.  These benefits can provide additional financial assistance or incentives to many employees alongside their major medical plans.

Regardless of which direction you go in 2015, now is the perfect time to take a step back and assess what is working well for your plan.  Talk to your benefits consultant to identify different avenues to explore in the New Year!


Helpful Information from 3 Presentations at the 2014 Compensation and Benefits Conference

Thursday, August 21st, 2014

Comp Ben Save Date 2014 (2)CAI hosted its 2014 Compensation and Benefits Conference at the McKimmon Center on Thursday, August 14 and Friday, August 15. More than 200 HR professionals and company executives attended the two-day event to review and discuss emerging workplace trends surrounding compensation, benefits and total rewards, as well as the impact these trends leave on culture and profitability.

This year’s conference speakers shared presentations on how to attract and motivate top talent, strategies to increase employee engagement, reinforcing a positive workplace culture, and more. Keynote presentations for the 2014 conference lineup included:

The Future of Attraction, Retention and Motivation: How Compensation Fits into the Process Anne Ruddy – WorldatWork

What Would Healthcare Look Like If Getting It at the Lowest Cost Was Your Key Priority? Skip Woody – Hill, Chesson & Woody Employee Benefit Services

Green Goldfish – 15 Ways to Drive Engagement & Reinforce Culture Stan Phelps – 9 INCH marketing

Leverage Marketplace Trends When Making Decisions about Compensation and Benefits Strategies Molly Hegeman – CAI

In addition to the keynote sessions, conference participants had the opportunity to attend several of the many breakout sessions. Why performance management fails, building high performing teams, work-site wellbeing, and understanding survey data are some of the topics of this year’s breakout sessions.

Below are three sets of insights conference speakers shared with last week’s audience:

–Anne Ruddy shared the changes in employee attitudes from recipients to consumers of rewards in her keynote presentation:


Employer loyalty

Traditional work design

Pay = position

Retirement security


Self-managed careers

Virtual, flexible environments

Pay = performance, market

Individual career management


–In the breakout session Why Performance Management Fails, Mike Maciekowich shared five reasons why companies need performance management systems:

  1. Help managers to observe their staff more closely and to do a better coaching job.
  2. Motivate employees by providing feedback on how they are doing.
  3. Provide back-up data for management decisions concerning advancement, transfers, dismissals, and so on.
  4. Improve organization development by identifying people with promotion potential and pin-pointing development needs.
  5. Establish a research and reference base for personnel decisions.


–CAI’s Sherry Hubbard-Bednasz explained the purpose of salary surveys in her presentation Taking the Mystery Out of Survey Data:

Salary surveys:

  • Provide a fair representation of pay practices occurring in the market
    • Sample reflects population
    • Consider source, methodology, transparency
  • Show how variables impact pay
    • Size of company
    • Industry/sector
    • Geography
  • Indicate trends in pay
    • Overall market movement
    • Movement in certain segments
  • Inform compensation decisions as a guide, not absolute

For additional information on CAI’s conferences, please go to


In An Environment Of Uncertainty, Prepare To Comply With The ACA

Thursday, August 14th, 2014

The post below is a guest blog from Mike Beck who serves as Principal, Health & Welfare Consultant for CAI’s employee benefits partner Hill, Chesson & Woody.

hcw 8 14In the last few weeks, there’s been multiple Affordable Care Act (ACA) developments, ultimately impacting large employers with 50 or more employees. How and when will they occur is another story, and it is easy to see why some employers are perplexed. Predicating what the ACA will look like a year from now is very difficult with some saying the employer mandate may be delayed again. Let’s review the recent events and how they are contradictory in many ways.

On July 22, the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit concluded that PPACA’s subsidies should only be available to individuals purchasing health insurance in exchanges operated by a state – calling into question all the subsidies that have been obtained to date through the Federal exchange. Hours later in Richmond, Va., the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit decided that legislative intent was to make tax subsidies available to individuals purchasing health insurance through a federally funded exchange or a state-based exchange if the state failed to create one. These two conflicting rulings are likely to go to the Supreme Court. For now, subsidies/tax credits will continue to be granted on the Federal Exchange. If the D.C. Circuit’s decision is upheld, it could strike a serious blow to the employer mandate since receiving a subsidy is a primary trigger of the employer mandate.

On July 24, the IRS published draft forms for the Code 6056 employer Minimum Essential Coverage reporting and disclosure requirement to the IRS and to individuals. This reporting requirement has multiple purposes as it allows the IRS to enforce the employer mandate, enforce the individual mandate, and confirm eligibility for premium tax credits for coverage purchased through an Exchange. This reporting along with the associated forms take effect in 2015 and are due in January 2016.

So in the same week, we witnessed a decision by an appeals court that called into question the viability of the Employer Mandate and suggested a possible delay, and then actions by the IRS which seem to indicate the Employer Mandate is moving forward as scheduled.

Regardless, large employers need to be prepared to comply with the employer mandate in 2015 and the associated reporting requirements. This should include a review of current payroll and HRIS systems to ensure they will be able to meet the new reporting requirements. The safe play is to assume that the employer mandate will go into effect without another delay, and if a delay occurs, organizations will have more breathing room to implement.

Are Gated Health Plans the Way of the Future?

Tuesday, July 22nd, 2014

The post below is a guest blog from Steve Byrd who serves as Principal, Health & Welfare Consultant for CAI’s employee benefits partner Hill, Chesson & Woody.

hcw 7 14As employers continue to identify new ways to control their health plan costs, many employers are considering gated health plans as an option. A “gated” health plan, offers a different spin on the traditional wellness incentive that employers and employees have become used to.  Instead of offering employees lower payroll deductions through the completion of a health assessment or completion of a biometric screening, employers are now considering the option of offering richer benefits as well.

In a recent survey, more than 1,000 employers were asked to disclose current plan designs and changes they expect in the next three to five years. It’s a way for employers to control costs and reward employees for their healthy lifestyles.

52 percent of employers said their current health plan focuses on traditional trend mitigation approaches, such as employee cost shifting. Interestingly enough, it dropped to 21 percent when asked if this would be their preferred approach in three-to-five years.

Employers are beginning to lean more towards plans that require employee action.

In the upcoming years, over 60 percent of employers plan to introduce a gated plan, where employees must complete a task to obtain access to richer design options, compared to only 20 percent who “gate” their employees today. In the past we’ve seen incentives to help lower payroll deductions, but now with gated plans, there is an option to improve benefits.

Employees are also considering implementing the following tactics to mitigate health costs:

  • 72 percent of employers are or will be reducing subsidies for dependents
  • 52 percent of employers anticipate using unitized pricing—where employees pay per person and not individual versus family—up from 5 percent today
  • 42 percent of employers are considering offering high-deductible health plans as a full replacement plan, up from 15 percent today
  • 24 percent of employers plan to offer employees tools to guide decisions in plan selection and utilization, up from 19 percent today
  • 92 percent plan to offer cost transparency tools, up from 49 percent today

While employers are evaluating these new options, and continuing to ask their employees to become more engaged, it is important they evaluate their plan designs carefully.  These new gated plan options are permissible under HIPAA wellness rules.  However, it is very important to ensure they are designed correctly, as they must be carefully structured to comply with both ADA and GINA requirements.  Also, these plans would need to provide a reasonable accommodation to anyone who can’t participate due to a disability, as restricting eligibility in a plan based on participation could be seen as more of a penalty than a monetary premium differential.

Employer vs. Federal Marketplace Open Enrollment

Thursday, June 19th, 2014

The post below is a guest blog from Dax Hill who serves as Principal, Health & Welfare Consultant for CAI’s employee benefits partner Hill, Chesson & Woody.

hcw juneEmployers with “non-calendar” plan years may find themselves in the middle of a dilemma with the Marketplace open enrollment.

In preparation of the “pay or play” provision under PPACA, some employers are looking to shift contributions towards the employee portion and away from the dependents coverage.  This strategy will help employers avoid penalties under 4980h of the tax code and make coverage “affordable” for the employee only portion.  However, redistributing premium contributions towards employees only coverage could significantly increase the cost for those employees with dependents.  These employers might assume that the dependents could then go apply for coverage though the Federal Marketplace – which works only if the employer’s open enrollment coincides with the Federal Marketplace open enrollment period. For 2014, the Open Enrollment Period was October 1, 2013–March 31, 2014. In 2015, the proposed Open Enrollment Period is November 15, 2014–February 15, 2015.

What happens if the employer increases dependent premiums during their open enrollment and the employer’s open enrollment does NOT coincide with the Federal Marketplace open enrollment?  In this scenario, an increase in premium is NOT a qualifying event for the Federal Marketplace – meaning that the dependents would not be eligible to enroll for medical coverage until the next Marketplace open enrollment.  Things can get more complicated assuming that your Section 125 plan runs on the same non-calendar plan year as your medical insurance plan year.  If dependents decide to remain on the employer’s medical insurance plan and pay on a pre-tax basis, the dependents would not be allowed to come off of the employer’s medical insurance plan unless they experienced a life qualifying event. At which point, they would again miss the open enrollment for Federal exchange.  You can see that this could become a vicious cycle and lead to frustration to both employers and employees.

There is a push to modify the regulations to allow individuals to obtain coverage mid-year through the Marketplace for non-calendar year plans.  In the meantime, employers should understand the regulations and strategies allowing individuals to enroll onto the Marketplace.

Contact an HCW consultant regarding possible solutions to this problematic situation.


Total Rewards and Business Strategy Are Not Aligned at Most Companies

Tuesday, June 10th, 2014

Expensive giftThe Total Rewards Survey developed by Mercer analyzes the practices companies use to align compensation, benefits, training and career development with today’s business priorities. Findings from the survey show that while more than half (56 percent) of organizations made a significant change to their total rewards strategy in the past three years, less than one-third (32 percent) said their total rewards and business strategies fully align.

Eighty-nine percent of organizations that participated in the survey ranked attracting and retaining the “right” talent as the most noteworthy challenge of their overall total rewards strategy. Additional challenges that were noted as very important included: collecting relevant market compensation data, keeping rewards affordable, communicating the value of rewards to employees, and ensuring pay for performance and performance differentiation.

From experiences with many clients, Mercer has highlighted several actions employers can put in place to address the holes between total rewards strategies and their business strategies:

“As companies focus on the cost of their talent, attracting and retaining the ‘right’ employees and differentiating rewards for top performers are challenges that can be made easier by incorporating the use of workforce analytics,” said Mary Ann Sardone, Partner in Mercer’s Talent practice and Regional Leader of the firm’s Rewards segment.

“Additionally, incorporating offerings such as career development and work/life balance initiatives into total rewards strategies caters to the needs of [employees] in the workplace.”

Leading the list of ways to enrich the employee experience in other ways than pay is giving employees the ability to make a difference in their job functions. Other contenders on the list were career progression, healthy living/wellness and recognition.

For additional information on recent trends and developments in total rewards strategy, including an in-depth look at what North Carolina employers are doing, please join us for the 2014 Compensation and Benefits Conference on August 14 and August 15 at Raleigh’s McKimmon Center.

This year’s keynote presenters and presentations include:

The Future of Attraction, Retention and Motivation: How Compensation Fits into the Process Anne Ruddy – WorldatWork

Green Goldfish – 15 Ways to Drive Engagement & Reinforce Culture Stan Phelps – 9 INCH marketing

What Would Healthcare Look Like If Getting It at the Lowest Cost Was Your Key Priority? Skip Woody – Hill, Chesson & Woody Employee Benefit Services

Leverage Marketplace Trends When Making Decisions about Compensation and Benefits Strategies Molly Hegeman – CAI

Additional topics that speakers will cover at the conference include: how compensation affects retention, the future of healthcare cost, driving employee engagement, analysis of the latest market data in total rewards, building high-performing teams, and understanding survey data.

For more information on conference speakers and topics, please visit

Wellness Programs Provide Measurable Improvements in Company Medical Costs and Risk Profiles

Tuesday, May 6th, 2014

office wellnessIn an effort to beat rising health care costs, employers are implementing programs that directly influence employees’ individual behaviors and health habits, according to the Willis Health and Productivity Survey conducted by Willis North America Human Capital Practice. Nine hundred employers, ranging in fewer than 100 employees to more than 10,000 employees, participated in the survey.

The health-focused survey shows that the return on investment from wellness programs is positive. Nearly half (49 percent) of the respondents with a wellness program cited measurable improvement in their organization’s medical costs or an improved risk profile among employees. Seventy-eight percent of the respondents with wellness plans said they were using an incentive to drive participation in employer-sponsored programs.

Companies are using their wellness programs to address behavioral change and lifestyle issues, like exercise and nutrition. Some key findings of the survey included:

  • Sixty-one percent of employers said that employees’ health habits are the number one challenge in controlling health care costs. High catastrophic cases ranked second with 47 percent and compliance due to health care reform was third with 34 percent.
  • Ninety-three percent of employers believe that healthier employees are more productive. However, few are measuring the impact on productivity of employee absenteeism (22 percent) and FMLA (19 percent).
  • The number one strategy organizations say they are using to address health care costs is to provide employees with tools and information in order to be better consumers. Sixty-four percent of respondents reported that as their best strategy.

Want to encourage your employees to maintain a healthier lifestyle? Check out some of the blogs below that focus on fitness and healthy living for tips:

Review this blog for tips in helping your employees achieve the right balance for their life at work and outside of work:

Looking for ways you can incorporate fitness into the office? This blog includes several work-friendly exercises:

Stress can lead to serious health consequences for your employees. Read this blog to find out how you can help your employees manage their stress levels:

Employee-sponsored wellness programs provide organizations with many benefits. If you’re interested in starting one at your organization, you will want to take a look at this blog: