Posts Tagged ‘Advice and Resolution’

Using Video Job Descriptions as a Recruiting Tool

Thursday, February 5th, 2015

Advice and Resolution team member Renee’ Watkins shares how a Video Job Description can add a personal touch to your company’s next job opening.

Renee' Watkins, HR Advisor

Renee’ Watkins, HR Advisor

Video Job Descriptions (VJDs) are nothing more than a short video clip used to describe a specific opening to a potential applicant. These are not meant to replace the typical text narrative of the job description and desired qualifications. Instead, they are meant to enhance and present a more personal viewpoint of a job opening.

Text narratives are often developed using the actual responsibilities and duties of the position, coupled with the required and preferred experience and education levels, with some help and guidance from both Human Resources and the hiring manager. Today’s job applicant lives in a world of Facetime, Skype, YouTube and other communications involving face-to-face contact across a website or wireless network. To some, the written word has become boring and uninteresting.

A personal touch can be a great way to capture the attention of a potential job seeker. That can be accomplished by having an existing team member describe their experience with the company or by having the manager describe the position and their management style in a VJD. This type of medium establishes a personal rapport with the candidate as if the manager or employee were speaking directly to the candidate. It also makes an impression that your organization is progressive when it comes to technology and social media.

The many advantages of using VJDs to enhance your job descriptions include:

  • Message presented by someone working with or in this role on a daily basis
  • Projects energy and excitement about the position not present in the written word
  • Immediately establishes a connection between the applicant and the team
  • Candidates will typically watch a video but may only skim a narrative
  • Viewable and sharable on any mobile platform – extends reach to more people
  • Facility video tours can generate excitement and interest
  • Simple and inexpensive to create – does not require professionals
  • Consider enhancing your next few job opening announcements by creating a VJD as a link from the job description on your website career page and social media profiles.

Need some help with recruiting talent for your company? Please call a member of CAI’s Advice and Resolution Team at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746. The team is available 24 hours each day!

Prepare for Difficult Conversations with Employees

Tuesday, October 14th, 2014

In today’s video blog, Renee’ Watkins, HR Advisor on CAI’s Advice and Resolution team, shares how to have difficult conversations with employees by offering a few steps to follow when delivering difficult news.

Renee’ starts by explaining that the key to delivering bad news is to lead the conversation with respect and sensitivity. She then offers several steps to make these conversations positive and productive experiences.  Some examples Renee gave in the video include: be specific and avoid generalities, show employees your willingness to listen, and allow employees the opportunity to give their side.

She says having these difficult conversations will make the difference between success and failure for a valued employee. By following the steps in the video, you can improve the lives of many of your team members.

For more information on having difficult discussions with employees, or if you have any questions, call a member of our Advice and Resolution team today at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746. The team is now available 24 hours each day throughout the week! Please give us a call!

Travel Time and the FLSA

Thursday, September 18th, 2014

In today’s video blog, George Ports, CAI’s Senior Executive of government relations and member of the Advice and Resolution team, shares helpful information for understanding the tricky subject of calculating compensable travel time.

George starts by saying some of the most confusing wage and hour regulations are those dealing with travel time for non-exempt employees. The question usually asked is, “is it or isn’t it compensable?” This confusion is due in part to the number of different situations involving travel.

George lists several scenarios that demonstrate a compensable travel time situation. For example, he says travel time to or from work is not compensable, but time that cuts across an employee’s regular work day is. He gives more examples in the video.

The video also includes information relevant with today’s technology-driven workplace. George shares the following information in the video: If an employee gets in his vehicle and receives special instructions on his cell phone or laptop before leaving home that time is compensable.

If you have questions about travel time or any other wage and hour regulation, please call CAI’s Advice and Resolution Team at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746.

Advantages of a Virtual Job Fair

Thursday, September 4th, 2014

In today’s post, Advice and Resolution team member Renee’ Watkins shares the many benefits of hosting a virtual job fair.  

Renee' Watkins, HR Advisor

Renee’ Watkins, HR Advisor

Hosting a physical job fair can be an expensive undertaking for any company. Unless you already have your own well-equipped facility, there are fees for facility rental, equipment, furnishings, insurance and even security. Depending on the overall success of the event, the cost of a single recruit can be very large indeed.

In fact, Recruiting Scope, an online resource for professional recruiters, determined in a recent study the average cost per recruit at a successful, in-person job fair can be as high as $121. Compare this with the average cost per recruit of $19 by hosting a “virtual” job fair.

Virtual job fairs provide an online environment using a variety of mediums like teleconferences, online chats and webcasts to join recruiters and candidates in an interactive experience. Information like resumes and online applications can be exchanged digitally and reviewed in real-time.

In addition to the dramatic reduction in cost per recruit, a virtual job fair also allows you to reach a larger group of potential candidates far outside the restrictions of your own geography. Imagine having a global audience attend your next job fair! A well-known global professional services firm presided over a virtual career fair that spanned 40 countries and more than 10,000 candidates in a two-day period.

A virtual job fair can also speed up the recruiting process, creating opportunities to conduct video interviews with viable candidates without the typical expenses of travel, etc. by either side.

Other reasons to explore a virtual job fair include:

  • A physical job fair presents a limitation on time spent with each candidate, as there are many candidates to see in a short amount of time. To fully qualify a recruit, you want to maximize the level of engagement before bringing them in for a face-to-face interview to ensure a good fit for the position and the corporate culture. Virtual interviews can provide that level of engagement.
  • Interviewing across a virtual channel can be a more comfortable and secure setting for both the candidate and the recruiter. A virtual interview process also enables for the candidate to speak with multiple persons within your organization at the same time or in succession. This is a process not often possible during a physical job fair due to time and scheduling constraints. Depending on the skillset and background presented, a recruiter can pass a candidate along down multiple paths within the organization, virtually, to gain a greater amount of feedback.
  • Another excellent use of a virtual recruiting center is the delivery of a consistent corporate message. With a physical job fair, there is a finite amount of information you can make available to candidates. Different information may be applicable to different candidates. With a virtual recruiting center, information can be built over time and divided along career paths for ease of navigation. Tips on resume presentation and interview skills can be made available. Online surveys and quizzes to help candidates determine their desired career paths are also a popular feature. Updates can be made as well, without the expense of reprinting materials.
  • While physical job fairs have a static beginning and ending date, virtual job fairs can be continuous, providing a constant stream of new applicants from which to actively recruit.

It is important to note, having a career page on your corporate website is not the same as a virtual job fair. Virtual job fairs are advertised through a number of online channels and media. They are specifically designed to emulate a physical job fair and to provide a similar experience to candidates. Career pages are typically very passive in nature with regard to recruiting, whereas virtual job fairs are both active and interactive with respect to the candidate’s experience.

Similar to a physical job fair, a virtual job fair can be the first impression of your organization a candidate receives, and therefore the experience can be extremely important in the recruiting process.

Wage and Hour Issues: Allowed Deductions From an Exempt Employee’s Salary

Thursday, August 7th, 2014

In today’s video blog, CAI’s Senior Executive of Government Relations and member of the Advice and Resolution team, George Ports, discusses allowed deductions from an exempt employee’s salary. George starts with a reminder: exempt employees are paid on a salary basis. Deductions are allowed but are limited. George shares an example in the video.

Another question that George explores is whether an employer is allowed to suspend an exempt employee without pay for violating a major work rule. He says the answer is yes, but the work rule must be major. He gives suggestions of what counts and what doesn’t.  George points out several scenarios that illustrate why you would have to pay an employee based on when he or she was suspended.

George offers additional deductions that can be made to an exempt employee’s salary in the video. One of the deductions he explains is the entire week concept. If there is not work completed by the employee in an entire week, the employer does not have to pay the employee for that week. Highlighting today’s technology, George emphasizes that if an employee is responding to emails or voicemails during this week, the entire work week exception is invalid.

Improper deductions from an exempt employee’s salary can destroy the exemption status for that employee and the exemption status of employees in that same classification, George says in the video. He also lists deductions that an employer is not allowed to take from an exempt employee’s salary.

If you have any questions about wage and hour regulations, please call CAI’s Advice and Resolution team at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746.

Employee Access to Personnel Files

Tuesday, January 7th, 2014
Renee' Watkins, HR Advisor

Renee’ Watkins, HR Advisor

CAI’s Advice and Resolution Team answers several questions from members daily. Many of the questions the Team receives concern employee personnel files, such as the one below:

Do employees have a right to review their personnel files?

In today’s post, Advice and Resolution Team Member Renee’ Watkins offers guidance for this employer issue:

For private employers, there is no North Carolina or federal law giving employees the right to see their file (absent a court order). However, from an employee relations perspective, it may be a good idea to grant access. The recommendation is that employers require employees to schedule an appointment, allow access to review their personnel file in the presence of the Human Resources Manager or a designated official, and that they not be allowed to remove items from the file or make photocopies.

It is also recommended that you review the file before the appointment to make sure that it does not contain information that should be kept separately (such as medical information, I-9’s, health insurance enrollment forms, background checks, references, self-identification of disability or veteran status, etc.).

Unlike employees in the private sector, state law provides that certain items in a public employee’s personnel file are a matter of public record and subject to inspection, thus granting access for public employees in North Carolina. Various laws permit access for state, county and city employees, as well as those of public hospitals, water and sewer authorities, community colleges and school districts. The following items in a public employee’s personnel file are a matter of public record and available to persons who request the information: name; age; date of original employment; current position title; current salary; date and amount of most recent increase or decrease in salary; date of most recent promotion, demotion, transfer, suspension, separation, or other change in position classification; and the office to which the employee is currently assigned.

If you have additional questions, please contact a member of CAI’s Advice and Resolution Team at 919‑878‑9222 or 336‑668‑7746.

 

Revoking an Offer of Employment

Thursday, December 5th, 2013

In today’s post Pat Rountree, an HR Advisor on CAI’s Advice and Resolution Team, shares important information to keep your company protected when revoking an offer of employment.

Pat Rountree 5x7 300dpi

Pat Rountree, HR Advisor

When making an offer of employment, be sure to advise the applicant of any contingencies that must be satisfied before the offer is final. These may include satisfactory drug test results, background and reference checks, or post offer medical exams. These contingencies in the offer may help protect you later if the offer is revoked based on unsatisfactory results.

There may be occasions (hopefully rare) when an employer has made the offer, received satisfactory results from contingencies, and then needs to revoke an offer. It may be for any number of reasons: a lost contract that eliminates the need for the position, a change in the direction of the company, etc. In this case, failure to fulfill your commitment to employ may result in a lawsuit based on the individual’s reliance on your offer.

There is also the potential for discrimination charges in connection with information acquired after the offer (for example, a prior disability or prior convictions that are not job related). For charges of discrimination, you would need to be able to show the business reasons for the revocation to challenge that there was a discriminatory purpose.

If you would like more information regarding offers of employment, please contact a member of CAI’s Advice and Resolution Team at 919‑878‑9222 or 336‑668‑7746.