Archive for the ‘Workforce Planning’ Category

HR Metrics that Matter: Talent Acquisition

Thursday, March 2nd, 2017

Unlike many other functions, human resources has not been able to develop and/or sustain universally accepted performance metrics.  As a result, HR metrics often vary widely from company to company and industry to industry. Additionally, the metrics that are most commonly used are not always the best indicators of HR performance or impact.  In fact, HR leaders often make the mistake of using metrics that relate specifically to how well HR is performing administrative tasks.

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The following measures are geared toward measuring HR’s actual impact on the business.

1. Quality of Hire

This metric can be calculated from a combination of a number of factors, including: performance review ratings, actual job results, 9-box ratings, and 6-month Quality of Hire Evaluation Form to obtain the hiring manager’s perspective. You could also review hires that turned over, hires on the promotable list, and hires on the performance improvement list to help determine quality of hire.

2. Time to Fill Key Roles

Not all job openings are equal. In fact, some mission-critical positions carry a lot more weight than a ‘rank-and-file’ opening. Recruiters and HR business partners should prioritize their job openings so that the key roles get the greatest attention. It doesn’t really matter if your overall time-to-fill metric is only 30 days, if it is taking 3 times that long as that to fill key roles.

3. Onboarding Effectiveness

There are basically two simple ways to determine if your onboarding process is effective. The first way is to conduct a post-onboarding survey with new hires on or about 90 days after being brought onboard.

The second way to ensure that the first 90 days are properly scripted into a series of events aimed at supporting the new hire, and ensuring they have been given exposure to the right people.

By asking for completed and signed-off copies of the checklist, with signatures of both the new hire and manager, you improve the likelihood that the onboarding process will be taken seriously.

4. New Hire Dropout Rate

One way to tell how effective the organization is in terms of selecting, hiring, onboarding, and training new hires is to review turnover data. If the turnover rates for new hires (say the first 180 days) or newly hired (first year) are significantly higher that the remaining employee population, you likely have real issues.

Start by asking these questions:

  1. Are we presenting a realistic job preview during the interview process?
  2. Do we have properly trained interviewers asking the right questions?
  3. Are we doing a good job of checking references?
  4. Do we have our act together in terms of a scripted onboarding progression?
  5. Are the hiring managers effectively setting clear expectations?
  6. Have we met the commitments we agreed to during the ‘courting’ stage?
  7. Are we selecting based upon cultural fit?
  8. Do we involve coworkers in the interviewing process?

CAI members have access to all forms, tools, and templates for talent acquisition / recruiting / onboarding online at myCAI. Not a member? CAI can help you build an engaged, well-managed and low-risk workplace, give us a call at 919-878-9222 or visit www.capital.org/membership to learn more.

Tom Sheehan brings 20+ years of extensive, broad-based strategic, tactical and practical HR experience to CAI’s Advice & Resolution team.  He advises HR and other business leaders on talent management, organizational effectiveness, employee engagement, M&A’s, and employee relations.

 

Telecommuting Should Be Carefully Planned

Tuesday, February 7th, 2017

Telecommuting, often referred to as “working from home,” is not for everyone or for every company.  There are pros and cons for both the company and for the employee that must be considered in order to be successful.

Employees interested in telecommuting imagine a definite benefit to having the ability to literally “come to work” each day in their pajamas.  However, many telecommuters fail to notice they can often work an average of 10-12 hours each day should they also work during their normal commute time.  Management sees an opportunity for increased productivity when telecommuting is offered to the workforce, yet may sacrifice some creative thinking as a result of less collaboration among team members.

Before instituting a policy on telecommuting, careful thought is required.  Although research has shown telecommuting provides for lower job-related stress, improved performance and greater job satisfaction, these positives do not happen for everyone.

Some workers who telecommute actually miss the face-to-face interaction with their co-workers and their management. Other trade-offs which can occur with telecommuting include increased productivity vs longer work days, greater independence vs less collaboration, and more flexibility with family and work vs blurred boundaries of the two.

As a company, some other factors to consider include:

  • Are employees allowed to decide if they telecommute?
  • How much are employees allowed to control their schedules?
  • Is an employee’s work interdependent on the work of others?
  • What are the current relationships with co-workers and supervisors?

Still, after some careful consideration and planning, a successful telecommuting implementation can be a powerful recruiting and retention tool.  Telecommuting opportunities can also open the door for a diverse and truly global workforce by taking advantage of available collaboration technology.

If your company decides to incorporate telecommuting, as an HR manager you’ll want to stay in the know. Ask managers who have telecommuters these types of questions –  How do your telecommuters separate their home life from work life? Do they have established “office” hours? Do they have a work environment conducive for a dedicated workspace? How do you keep the lines of communication open? Understanding the answers to these types of questions will help HR with the broader view of how telecommuting impacts your particular organization. Learn more about how CAI helps 1,100+ North Carolina member companies with HR, Compliance & People Development Solutions.  

 
CAI’s Advice & Resolution Advisor Renee Watkins is a seasoned HR professional with a diverse background in Human Resource. Renee provides CAI members with practical advice in a wide range of human resource functions including conflict resolution, compliance and regulatory issues, and employee relations.

Why Human Capital Isn’t Enough

Thursday, January 26th, 2017

It’s pretty common today to hear leaders and organizations talk about “human capital.”

I can still remember when that term started frequenting our vocabulary a few years ago. As an HR leader, it felt like we’d stumbled onto something that might finally help us earn our legitimate seat at the executive table.

After all, most executives worship capital. Possessing financial capital usually means we are flourishing and able to seize opportunities. Capital is power.

So, finding a way to talk about employees and talent as a form of capital was brilliant. Even the CFO seemed to be on board with acknowledging that there was a real value in the collective knowledge, skills, and abilities of our employees. And, like any asset, if you make continued investment in it over time, the value steadily increases.

As a result of human capital being more widely used and understood, our talent management practices became intensely focused on developing employees’ individual competencies. The more each individual acquired skills and abilities, the more our human capital grew.

This model was highly effective when executed well. Jack Welch became a legend in part because of the training and development efforts he funded at GE. Human capital was seen as a competitive advantage by many.

But, then the game changed. The internet and social technology emerged to connect the world together in a way that had been unthinkable in the past. The days of doing work independently faded rapidly, and it became imperative to work together in collaboration.

Evidence of this shift can be seen everywhere. An online encyclopedia populated exclusively with user-contributed content nearly put traditional encyclopedias out of business. And, the most powerful operating system in the world was created by a community or programmers with no formal organization to manage their work.

The very nature of how we work and create value shifted.

The human capital model of human resources is incomplete, because it doesn’t account for the importance and value that exists through relationships. In today’s world, work is done together. And because of this, a new and highly valuable kind of capital has emerged: social capital

In order to compete effectively today and in the future, human resources professionals must not only work to build human capital, but also social capital. This will requires taking on new roles and skill sets for our organizations.

If you are are an HR professional or manage HR for your company, please join me on March 9 at the HR Management Conference to explore how HR must embrace our new role as Social Architect.

 

This is a guest post from Jason Lauritsen who will be speaking at CAI’s upcoming HR Management Conference on March 8 & 9th in Raleigh. Jason has been described as “a corporate executive gone rogue.” For nearly a decade, he spent his days as a corporate HR leader where he developed a reputation for driving results through talent. As Director of Client Success for Quantum Workplace, he leads a team dedicated to helping organizations make work better for employees every day.

Don’t Overlook the True Value of Your Employee Handbook

Thursday, January 19th, 2017

Employee handbooks are a vital part of outlining and communicating your company policies while creating a “picture” of your company culture and mission.  All companies–regardless of their size, industry, or number of employees should have an employee handbook in place, be it hard copy, e-version, or on-line. A company handbook can be as robust and detailed or as simple and short as needed depending on your business and culture. Let’s review several of the major purposes and benefits of having a company handbook.

Legal Protection: A handbook should outline the company’s position on important legal or regulatory issues such as At-Will Employment, anti-harassment or discrimination policies, wage and hour compliance or drug testing policies. Should one of these situations become a workplace issue, an employer can support their actions based on what is outlined in their handbook. Handbooks are a great tool in helping set employee expectations.

Company Culture/Mission: A handbook provides employees with an understanding of the company’s mission and culture. By placing an emphasis on aspects of employment that the company values (volunteerism or code of conduct) the employees will have a better idea of the culture that is desired and supported by senior management. Understanding the company’s culture will allow employees to have clear and consistent expectations of conduct and performance.  The handbook is also a great place for the CEO to “tell the story” of the company to help employees understand why the company exists.

Guide for Employees: An employee handbook should be written with the employee in mind. The handbook should outline policies, practices and other key information that is pertinent to the employee.  Providing relevant and pertinent information to employees allows employees to understand and manage that what is important to them (such as benefits, pay cycle information, vacation schedules, etc.) as well as develop an understanding of the expectations and consequences of their actions.  An employee handbook can also serve as a source for creating positive employee relations such as internal dispute resolution rather than through an external source such as government agency.

Guide for Supervisors/Managers: Managers and supervisors need reference materials in order to help them lead their teams. Having an understanding of policies such as PTO (how to earn it, when to use it, what happens if it isn’t used at the end of the year) is just as important as reviewing the company’s discipline policy or time management policies. A handbook is a great starting place for supervisors and managers but they should refer to specific company policies and or consult with their HR team.

CAI members have access to handbook guides to help you get started. Our Advice & Resolution team also provides complimentary handbook reviews and our HR On Demand team can work with you to create a custom handbook for your organization.

Emily’s primary area of focus is providing expert advice and support in the areas of employee relations and federal and state employment law compliance as a member of the Advice & Resolution team for CAI. Additionally, Emily advises business and HR leaders in operational and strategic human resources areas such as talent and performance management, employee engagement, and M&A’s. Emily has 10+ years of broad-based HR business partnering experience centering around employee relations, compliance & regulatory employment issues, strategic and tactical human resources, and strong process improvement skills.

For Millennials, Lack of Loyalty May Be a Sign of Neglect

Thursday, January 12th, 2017

The prevailing wisdom is that, in general, Millennials express little loyalty to their current employers and many are planning near-term exits. During the next year, if given the choice, 25% of Millennials would quit his or her current employer to join a new organization or to do something different. That figure increases to 44 % when the time frame is expanded to two years. (Source: Deloitte’s 2016 Millennial Survey)

This “loyalty challenge” is driven by a variety of factors, for example:

  1. Millennials feel underutilized and believe they’re not being developed as leaders.
  2. Millennials feel that most businesses have no ambition beyond profit, and there are distinct differences in what they believe the purpose of business should be and what they perceive it to currently be.
  3. Millennials often put their personal values ahead of organizational goals, and several have shunned
    assignments (and potential employers) that conflict with their beliefs.

Millennials have recently inched past the other generations to corner the largest share of the US labor market and a growing number now occupy senior positions. They are no longer leaders of tomorrow, but increasingly, leaders of today. We also recognize that Millennials are taking their values with them into the boardroom.

While many Millennials have already attained senior positions, much remains to be done. More than six in
ten Millennials (63 %) say their “leadership skills are not being fully developed.” Unfortunately, little progress is being made in this area. When asked to rate the skills and attributes on which businesses place the most value (and are prepared to pay the highest salaries), Millennials pointed to “leadership” as being the most prized.

Millennials fully appreciate that leadership skills are important to business and recognize that, in this respect, their development may be far from complete. But, based on the current results, Millennials believe businesses are not doing enough to bridge the gap to ensure a new generation of business leaders is created. Need help with workforce strategy and planning? CAI can help!

Tom Sheehan brings 20+ years of extensive, broad-based strategic, tactical and practical HR experience to CAI’s Advice & Resolution team.  He advises HR and other business leaders on talent management, organizational effectiveness, employee engagement, M&A’s, and employee relations. 

How Effective is Succession Planning in your Organization?

Wednesday, December 28th, 2016

Succession is defined as the right, act, or process, by which one person succeeds to the office or rank of another.

How is the succession of your organizations’ talent happening?  Do some of your employees have implied “rights” to specific positions? Does their “time in grade” entitle those who have “paid their dues” to simply move into a vacated senior position regardless whether or not they are the most qualified or possess the most potential?

Does your organization use the “replacement” method of succession whereby a successor is simply chosen from a ‘short list” of employees that a select group of managers have compiled behind closed doors?

Or does your HR organization provide a collaborative process that brings leaders together to discuss designated positions and relevant potential talent as possible candidates? This of course, is the most effective and desired state.

If your succession process is not of the “desired state” mentioned above, then you are missing out on an incredible opportunity to enable your
business as well as potentially putting your business at risk by not filling opportunities with the top talent within your organization.

How do you get started?  Here are the first 3 steps:

  • As an HR business partner, you first need to be sure you completely understand your business and its current / future strategy and goals.
  • You then need to understand your organization’s key positions that drive and impact your business.  This includes not only key leadership roles but also positions with specialized skills that are challenging to find and or develop.
  • Next, and most importantly, you need to get buy-in from your GM/CEO, key leaders, etc. in the development and implementation of a succession process for your business. Although HR should own this process, succession is not a standalone HR “project” and needs to be done collaboratively and with the support, understanding, and buy-in of senior leaders and other key stakeholders.

Many small and medium-sized businesses fall into the trap of not implementing a succession plan, just like many people put off creating a will. While there are many other key considerations and variables that go into a developing a succession plan, don’t look at the process as insurmountable. CAI can help bring order to the process and partner with you along the way.

Rick Washburn leads the Advice & Resolution team at CAI. In his role, he advises executives and HR professionals on strategic and organizational issues, tackling subjects ranging from employee engagement to talent management. With his 25 years experience in HR management, Rick is uniquely poised to advice and lead businesses to successful HR strategies.

Broaching the Subject of Retirement with Employees

Thursday, May 12th, 2016

Baby boomers retiringWith more millennials entering the workforce and baby boomers preparing to move out of workforce, the question often comes up “Can we ask Tracy when s/he plans to retire?”    Just to be clear, although social security has a retirement age to qualify for benefits, there is no mandatory retirement age for most employees.  (Some exceptions exist for airline pilots, federal law enforcement officers, firefighters, air traffic controllers, and bona fide executives or high policy makers.)

So can you ask employees about retirement and if so how?  The short answer to this question is a qualified yes, as long as you handle it appropriately.  When done wrong, particularly if you badger the employee, mention “generational words,” or when a supervisor keeps asking, pushing, and treating someone badly for giving a “wrong answer.”  The time and place also matter.  If we never ask the question and all of a sudden start asking all of our employees over 55 when they plan to retire could at the very least cause a morale problem.

Nonetheless, there is nothing inherently wrong with asking any employee about their future plans, and companies need to know that information for many reasons.  The fear of being accused of (or sued because of) age discrimination sometimes makes employers hesitant to ask about retirement.  So in what ways can you broach the subject of an employee’s retirement plans?

  • When an employee has mentioned they are thinking about retirement, you can ask them if they have a date in mind and that you would appreciate if they would give you ample notice to find someone to fill the job and perhaps have them train the person.  If they are not receptive or do not have a date in mind, be sensitive and follow-up in an appropriate way at a later time.
  • For workplace planning purposes, especially in key positions or those that have a longer learning curve/training period in job specific methods.
  • Through a policy that says if you are planning to retire, please give us as much notice as possible so that we can discuss options for training someone to fill the position as well as options for phased retirement (if that is something the Company would consider).
  • Through voluntary early retirement incentive plans that offer a severance to employees who meet a minimum age and number of years of service with a company and elect to take the package.  These should be carefully developed keeping in mind the needs of the business and compliance concerns.  They are generally used when a reduction in force is required and in lieu of an involuntary RIF.  An employment law attorney should be consulted in drawing up such agreements.
  • But what about when you have a great employee you hate to lose but you sense retirement may be in the cards?  In this case, ideally the person having this conversation with the employee has a good relationship with them and ideally that would be the manager.  The idea of retiring is stressful for many employees so we want to be delicate.  The annual review is a good time to venture into this territory particularly when discussing plans for the next year.  You can simply ask, “So Ted, what are your plans for the next year” and see where the conversation takes you.  You are asking merely for planning purposes.  Again, don’t push or badger them for an answer.  You just want to open the door.  It’s ok if they don’t want to walk through that door now.

Options for a smooth transition for the company and employees who plan to retire may include offering phased retirement, where employees gradually reduce their hours as they continue to work part-time until full retirement or while they train and transfer knowledge. Also, upon receipt of the unexpected notice that an employee plans to retire, the company may offer incentives to retain the employee through a training period for a new employee filling their position (be sensitive to the term “replacement” as no exiting employee wants to feel like they can be easily replaced).

Whatever the case, employers should always be prepared for employees leaving, whether through retirement or leaving for another job.  Workforce planning should be an on-going strategy, documenting processes, cross-training where applicable, and maintaining succession plans.  Absent a contract, employment is at-will (either the employee or the company can end employment at any time).  So why should notice of retirement be any different than an employee’s choice to take another job and give notice? The point is, don’t get caught off-guard.  Be prepared whatever the reason.  Let us know if we can help with your workforce management and planning.