Archive for the ‘Talent Acquisition’ Category

Utilize Employee Referrals to Hire Top Talent

Thursday, March 23rd, 2017

If one of your top sources for hiring isn’t from employee referrals, then you are missing out on an incredible source of quality hires.

When your business is ready to hire a new employee, where do you typically look first? If you’re like many smaller companies, you may start by asking current employees for referrals. Hiring from the networks of your current team has always seemed like a good idea. Recent research now shows that it’s actually the most effective way to find a match for your company.

  1. Leadership IQ 2012 Global Talent Management Survey found that employee referrals were the most effective recruiting channel for front-line performers.
  2. According to recent Glassdoor research report, “Why Interview Sources Matter in Hiring,” employee referrals boost the odds of a successful job match by a statistically significant 2.6 to 6.6 percent.
  3. A recent jobvite survey found that while only 7 percent of applicants came from employee referrals, that 7% accounted for 40% of new hires.  Hires came faster through employee referrals at an average of 29 days, versus 39 days from a job board and 55 days from a career site.  Forty-seven percent of referrals stayed with the company for more than 3 years versus only 14% hired through job boards.
  4. For more hard facts touting the benefits of referrals, click here.

Although employee referrals more often result in accepted offers, most companies do not seem to be using those referrals enough. According to CAI’s latest NC Policies and Benefits Survey, 69% of local employers do not offer a bonus for employee referrals.  That number reveals that companies might have better luck sourcing and hiring the right candidates by focusing on asking for and rewarding employee referrals.

Why are employee referrals so effective in finding the right hire for an open position?

Much like turning to TripAdvisor reviews before choosing a restaurant, employee referrals provide useful context to both the job seeker and the company. Job seekers gain insights about prospective employers from the employee, and companies learn about the reputation of candidates from the recommender.

If you want to maximize the effect of employee referrals for sourcing your next great hire, consider taking the following steps:

  1. Ask for referrals. Don’t assume your current employees are focused on your hiring needs; instead, actively communicate with them about open positions and the types of candidates you seek. Regularly remind employees that they are well suited for recommending others who would fit at your company, and ask them to refer candidates in their networks.
  2. Be specific. Don’t just ask employees to send their friends and family members to you. There’s no reason to be bombarded with résumés of people who may be trusted but are not a fit for potential positions. Instead, share details about specific job requirements and the experience the new hire will have.  Even better, give employees Facebook and Linkedin links about the job they can share with their friends.
  3. Reward successful referrals. If a current employee refers a job seeker who you eventually hire, they should be rewarded. Establish a reward system and communicate it to all employees. For instance, you might reward them with a small monetary bonus, gift card or special privileges at work.  According to CAI’s latest NC Policies and Benefits Survey, the average bonus payout is $575 for non-exempt hires and $747 for exempt hires.  Now at first glance, those numbers seem reasonable and would clearly motivate some people.  At the same time, the average recruiting fee paid to an agency is 21%, or $6,300 for that $35,000 administrative person or $12,600 for that $60,000 engineer.  What would happen if you paid $2,000 for successful employee referrals ($500 up front and $500 after 6 months and $1,000 after a year, or something like that)?

It’s important to remember that people trust one another more than they trust companies. Embrace this way of thinking, and empower your own people to help you recruit with a human approach by embracing the employee referral. CAI members always have access to the latest salary and policies and benefits survey information to help them make smart hiring decisions and retain top talent. Find out how CAI can help your company.

Tom Sheehan brings 20+ years of extensive, broad-based strategic, tactical and practical HR experience to CAI’s Advice & Resolution team.  He advises HR and other business leaders on talent management, organizational effectiveness, employee engagement, M&A’s, and employee relations.

HR Metrics that Matter: Talent Acquisition

Thursday, March 2nd, 2017

Unlike many other functions, human resources has not been able to develop and/or sustain universally accepted performance metrics.  As a result, HR metrics often vary widely from company to company and industry to industry. Additionally, the metrics that are most commonly used are not always the best indicators of HR performance or impact.  In fact, HR leaders often make the mistake of using metrics that relate specifically to how well HR is performing administrative tasks.

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The following measures are geared toward measuring HR’s actual impact on the business.

1. Quality of Hire

This metric can be calculated from a combination of a number of factors, including: performance review ratings, actual job results, 9-box ratings, and 6-month Quality of Hire Evaluation Form to obtain the hiring manager’s perspective. You could also review hires that turned over, hires on the promotable list, and hires on the performance improvement list to help determine quality of hire.

2. Time to Fill Key Roles

Not all job openings are equal. In fact, some mission-critical positions carry a lot more weight than a ‘rank-and-file’ opening. Recruiters and HR business partners should prioritize their job openings so that the key roles get the greatest attention. It doesn’t really matter if your overall time-to-fill metric is only 30 days, if it is taking 3 times that long as that to fill key roles.

3. Onboarding Effectiveness

There are basically two simple ways to determine if your onboarding process is effective. The first way is to conduct a post-onboarding survey with new hires on or about 90 days after being brought onboard.

The second way to ensure that the first 90 days are properly scripted into a series of events aimed at supporting the new hire, and ensuring they have been given exposure to the right people.

By asking for completed and signed-off copies of the checklist, with signatures of both the new hire and manager, you improve the likelihood that the onboarding process will be taken seriously.

4. New Hire Dropout Rate

One way to tell how effective the organization is in terms of selecting, hiring, onboarding, and training new hires is to review turnover data. If the turnover rates for new hires (say the first 180 days) or newly hired (first year) are significantly higher that the remaining employee population, you likely have real issues.

Start by asking these questions:

  1. Are we presenting a realistic job preview during the interview process?
  2. Do we have properly trained interviewers asking the right questions?
  3. Are we doing a good job of checking references?
  4. Do we have our act together in terms of a scripted onboarding progression?
  5. Are the hiring managers effectively setting clear expectations?
  6. Have we met the commitments we agreed to during the ‘courting’ stage?
  7. Are we selecting based upon cultural fit?
  8. Do we involve coworkers in the interviewing process?

CAI members have access to all forms, tools, and templates for talent acquisition / recruiting / onboarding online at myCAI. Not a member? CAI can help you build an engaged, well-managed and low-risk workplace, give us a call at 919-878-9222 or visit www.capital.org/membership to learn more.

Tom Sheehan brings 20+ years of extensive, broad-based strategic, tactical and practical HR experience to CAI’s Advice & Resolution team.  He advises HR and other business leaders on talent management, organizational effectiveness, employee engagement, M&A’s, and employee relations.

 

Why Human Capital Isn’t Enough

Thursday, January 26th, 2017

It’s pretty common today to hear leaders and organizations talk about “human capital.”

I can still remember when that term started frequenting our vocabulary a few years ago. As an HR leader, it felt like we’d stumbled onto something that might finally help us earn our legitimate seat at the executive table.

After all, most executives worship capital. Possessing financial capital usually means we are flourishing and able to seize opportunities. Capital is power.

So, finding a way to talk about employees and talent as a form of capital was brilliant. Even the CFO seemed to be on board with acknowledging that there was a real value in the collective knowledge, skills, and abilities of our employees. And, like any asset, if you make continued investment in it over time, the value steadily increases.

As a result of human capital being more widely used and understood, our talent management practices became intensely focused on developing employees’ individual competencies. The more each individual acquired skills and abilities, the more our human capital grew.

This model was highly effective when executed well. Jack Welch became a legend in part because of the training and development efforts he funded at GE. Human capital was seen as a competitive advantage by many.

But, then the game changed. The internet and social technology emerged to connect the world together in a way that had been unthinkable in the past. The days of doing work independently faded rapidly, and it became imperative to work together in collaboration.

Evidence of this shift can be seen everywhere. An online encyclopedia populated exclusively with user-contributed content nearly put traditional encyclopedias out of business. And, the most powerful operating system in the world was created by a community or programmers with no formal organization to manage their work.

The very nature of how we work and create value shifted.

The human capital model of human resources is incomplete, because it doesn’t account for the importance and value that exists through relationships. In today’s world, work is done together. And because of this, a new and highly valuable kind of capital has emerged: social capital

In order to compete effectively today and in the future, human resources professionals must not only work to build human capital, but also social capital. This will requires taking on new roles and skill sets for our organizations.

If you are are an HR professional or manage HR for your company, please join me on March 9 at the HR Management Conference to explore how HR must embrace our new role as Social Architect.

 

This is a guest post from Jason Lauritsen who will be speaking at CAI’s upcoming HR Management Conference on March 8 & 9th in Raleigh. Jason has been described as “a corporate executive gone rogue.” For nearly a decade, he spent his days as a corporate HR leader where he developed a reputation for driving results through talent. As Director of Client Success for Quantum Workplace, he leads a team dedicated to helping organizations make work better for employees every day.

Don’t Overlook the True Value of Your Employee Handbook

Thursday, January 19th, 2017

Employee handbooks are a vital part of outlining and communicating your company policies while creating a “picture” of your company culture and mission.  All companies–regardless of their size, industry, or number of employees should have an employee handbook in place, be it hard copy, e-version, or on-line. A company handbook can be as robust and detailed or as simple and short as needed depending on your business and culture. Let’s review several of the major purposes and benefits of having a company handbook.

Legal Protection: A handbook should outline the company’s position on important legal or regulatory issues such as At-Will Employment, anti-harassment or discrimination policies, wage and hour compliance or drug testing policies. Should one of these situations become a workplace issue, an employer can support their actions based on what is outlined in their handbook. Handbooks are a great tool in helping set employee expectations.

Company Culture/Mission: A handbook provides employees with an understanding of the company’s mission and culture. By placing an emphasis on aspects of employment that the company values (volunteerism or code of conduct) the employees will have a better idea of the culture that is desired and supported by senior management. Understanding the company’s culture will allow employees to have clear and consistent expectations of conduct and performance.  The handbook is also a great place for the CEO to “tell the story” of the company to help employees understand why the company exists.

Guide for Employees: An employee handbook should be written with the employee in mind. The handbook should outline policies, practices and other key information that is pertinent to the employee.  Providing relevant and pertinent information to employees allows employees to understand and manage that what is important to them (such as benefits, pay cycle information, vacation schedules, etc.) as well as develop an understanding of the expectations and consequences of their actions.  An employee handbook can also serve as a source for creating positive employee relations such as internal dispute resolution rather than through an external source such as government agency.

Guide for Supervisors/Managers: Managers and supervisors need reference materials in order to help them lead their teams. Having an understanding of policies such as PTO (how to earn it, when to use it, what happens if it isn’t used at the end of the year) is just as important as reviewing the company’s discipline policy or time management policies. A handbook is a great starting place for supervisors and managers but they should refer to specific company policies and or consult with their HR team.

CAI members have access to handbook guides to help you get started. Our Advice & Resolution team also provides complimentary handbook reviews and our HR On Demand team can work with you to create a custom handbook for your organization.

Emily’s primary area of focus is providing expert advice and support in the areas of employee relations and federal and state employment law compliance as a member of the Advice & Resolution team for CAI. Additionally, Emily advises business and HR leaders in operational and strategic human resources areas such as talent and performance management, employee engagement, and M&A’s. Emily has 10+ years of broad-based HR business partnering experience centering around employee relations, compliance & regulatory employment issues, strategic and tactical human resources, and strong process improvement skills.

For Millennials, Lack of Loyalty May Be a Sign of Neglect

Thursday, January 12th, 2017

The prevailing wisdom is that, in general, Millennials express little loyalty to their current employers and many are planning near-term exits. During the next year, if given the choice, 25% of Millennials would quit his or her current employer to join a new organization or to do something different. That figure increases to 44 % when the time frame is expanded to two years. (Source: Deloitte’s 2016 Millennial Survey)

This “loyalty challenge” is driven by a variety of factors, for example:

  1. Millennials feel underutilized and believe they’re not being developed as leaders.
  2. Millennials feel that most businesses have no ambition beyond profit, and there are distinct differences in what they believe the purpose of business should be and what they perceive it to currently be.
  3. Millennials often put their personal values ahead of organizational goals, and several have shunned
    assignments (and potential employers) that conflict with their beliefs.

Millennials have recently inched past the other generations to corner the largest share of the US labor market and a growing number now occupy senior positions. They are no longer leaders of tomorrow, but increasingly, leaders of today. We also recognize that Millennials are taking their values with them into the boardroom.

While many Millennials have already attained senior positions, much remains to be done. More than six in
ten Millennials (63 %) say their “leadership skills are not being fully developed.” Unfortunately, little progress is being made in this area. When asked to rate the skills and attributes on which businesses place the most value (and are prepared to pay the highest salaries), Millennials pointed to “leadership” as being the most prized.

Millennials fully appreciate that leadership skills are important to business and recognize that, in this respect, their development may be far from complete. But, based on the current results, Millennials believe businesses are not doing enough to bridge the gap to ensure a new generation of business leaders is created. Need help with workforce strategy and planning? CAI can help!

Tom Sheehan brings 20+ years of extensive, broad-based strategic, tactical and practical HR experience to CAI’s Advice & Resolution team.  He advises HR and other business leaders on talent management, organizational effectiveness, employee engagement, M&A’s, and employee relations. 

The Role Social Media Plays in the Job Application Process

Tuesday, July 26th, 2016

ICIMS, a software company specializing in applicant tracking systems, has released their “2015 Job Seekers Get Social” report, detailing how social networks are playing a role in the recruiting and hiring process.  Information contained in social networks such as LinkedIn, Google+, and Facebook is being used to populate data within online job applications.

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Job seekers use their social networks to find job opportunities, research companies, share job openings with friends and get feedback from current and former employees regarding the inside intel on organizations they are considering working for.

According to the survey, 3.3 million applications were submitted online in 2015.  Sixty-one percent (61%) of these applications came via LinkedIn, 22% came through Google+ and 17% were populated using Facebook. Fifty-seven percent (57%) of all job seekers surveyed indicated they rely on social media at least once a month to research possible employers.

Of the industry verticals included in the survey, job openings in Information Technology, Construction, and Leisure & Hospitality received the highest number of online applications via social networks.  Public Administration, Financial Services, and Education & Health Services received the smallest number of online job applications fed by social networks.

Employers who do not fully embrace the potential effect of social networks on the recruiting and hiring process in today’s job market run the risk of losing out to their competitors when it comes to attracting top talent.  By allowing job seekers to apply with their LinkedIn, Google+, or Facebook accounts, companies can offer candidates a quick and easy way to express interest in open jobs, protecting recruiting investments, and boosting the candidate experience and talent pipeline.

Need help figuring out how to best use social media for your recruiting purposes? Reach out to our Advice & Resolution team.

renee

 

CAI Advice & Resolution team member Renee Watkins is a seasoned HR professional with a diverse background in Human Resource. Renee provides CAI members with practical advice in a wide-range of human resource functions including conflict resolution, compliance and regulatory issues, and employee relations.

Don’t Lose Your New Star on the First Day

Thursday, July 21st, 2016

The first day on a new job – Excitement, anticipation, fear, for the new employee AND their family. An employee’s first day can make the difference between them staying and leaving, between them being motivated and engaged or just riding out their time until something better comes along.  I’m going to illustrate my point by tracking the first day experiences of two new star employees: Jane Regret and Tom Happy. Think about which story sounds like your company.

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Jane’s first day starts with her husband wishing her luck.   She arrives early, beaming with excitement.  Jane becomes concerned as she learns the receptionist wasn’t expecting her and didn’t know if her boss Joe Smith was even in.  After ten minutes of calls and pages the receptionist finally reaches Joe, who apparently forgot she was starting that day.  Jane is asked to go to HR to fill out paperwork and told that Joe will meet her later.   Jane spends the next two hours in HR signing forms, hearing about benefits, and watching an old company video.   HR takes Jane to her desk, which really isn’t her desk because they haven’t figured out yet where Jane will sit.    HR gives Jane the policy manual to read and sign now, a catalog to order supplies and is told her computer should arrive in a few days.  Joe Smith finally pops in between meetings for a quick hello, telling Jane he’ll see her at Fred’s going away party this afternoon.   After going out to lunch by herself Jane attends the party for Fred, who is moving on after only 5 years.  Joe actually missed the party so Jane will try to find him on Tuesday.  Jane gets home and tells her husband that she may have made a big mistake.

Tom Happy’s wife Linda was surprised to find a rather large package from Tom’s new employer on the porch, especially since he hadn’t even started working there yet.  As Linda opens the box she calls to Tom, “Wow, it’s all kinds of company merchandise, shirts, hats, sweatshirts, etc.  There is also a copy of the company handbook for you to read.  And look there are tickets to the local baseball game – how did they know we love baseball?  And a note from your boss Jack Smith – Welcome aboard, can’t wait to start hitting home runs together.  See you in a month!”

happyTom leaves home on day one and Linda kisses him goodbye and wishes him well.  He arrives early and as he approaches the receptionist he sees his picture on the large TV in the lobby that reads “Today is Tom Happy day! Welcome Tom.”  The receptionist tells Tom they are glad to see him and that Jack will be right here.    Jack greets Tom, “I am so glad you are here, look we need you to sign some paperwork but first, let’s meet your teammates.”  As they approach Tom’s work area he sees streamers, balloons, and a gathering of people.

Tom’s teammates have gathered for coffee and bagels to welcome him.  They talk baseball, kids, share funny stories, etc. When Tom enters his office everything is there – supplies, computer, business cards, etc. After a quick visit to HR, Tom and Jack meet for several hours to review Tom’s 90 day plan and success factors. Several co-workers take Tom to lunch and share company history, why they came here, how important Tom’s role is to the team, and answer his questions about what it is really like to work here. Tom arrives home beaming and tells Linda how she won’t believe the day he had. Replies Linda, “I have an idea – look what Jack sent us – a bottle of wine with this note – Welcome aboard Tom and Linda, let’s raise a toast to a great new relationship.   We’re so glad you two have joined our family.”

These stories, while extreme, do teach us some valuable lessons about how we start our new employees. Think about Tom and Jane.  Which one is more motivated?  Which one is already questioning their decision?  Which one is susceptible to being recruited away? What will each person tell their family, their friends?  What might they post on Facebook or glassdoor.com?

Now, think about which story most resembles your company.  Most organizations I’m afraid resemble Jane’s experience.  Everyone’s doing more with less so few have time to go that extra mile for new employees.  At other companies “only the strong survive,” so they intentionally do not pamper newbies.

Feeling unwelcome, having a boss that doesn’t have time, an unclear job plan all increase the odds that you’ll lose that new star.  And once word gets out about your culture you’ll have a harder time attracting new stars.   You’ll also lose the training costs you’ve sunk into new employees as they leave. Depending on the level of position it can take anywhere from 8 to 28 weeks for a new employee to reach full productivity.

With this backdrop, here are some components of the best on-boarding plans.  Notice that these activities don’t require a large budget, just time and attention.

  • Activities that make a new employee feel welcome.  First impressions that people form about your company are extremely hard to overcome. Instead of just throwing parties for people who are leaving, celebrate your new stars.
  • One-on-one time with supervisor and other leadership. Don’t rush someone onto the payroll if you don’t have time to spend with them. Consider having new employee start on a day other than Monday if that’s your busiest.
  • Introduction into the formal and informal culture. Consider activities such as CEO meetings with newhires, “skip level” lunches, lunch-n-learns, and a buddy system to help new employees understand expected behaviors.
  • A carefully chosen mentor or buddy to help them navigate through your culture, processes and operation. A safe place to learn how things really operate.
  • Just-in-time resources that provide answers for the new employee.  Company acronym dictionaries, process diagrams, auto-enrolled into appropriate listserves and forums, phone lists, community information for relocations, etc.
  • Feedback and guidance on job performance.  Make sure your new hires are working a clear 90 day plan versus walking around aimlessly, with regrets.

A successful on-boarding process should cover the entire first year for the new hire and include all activities through which new employees acquire the necessary knowledge, skills, and behaviors to become effective.  When done right, on-boarding can lead to higher job satisfaction, better job performance, greater organizational commitment, and reduction in stress and intent to quit.

So start them off right and watch them soar.  Or, start them off wrong and watch them fly away.  Your choice.

p.s.  And when you lose a long term star from your team, odds are they’ll find themselves in a bad first day questioning their move.  Call them that first day and just tell them you’re thinking about them and hoping they are having a great first day!

Learn more about how our Advice & Resolution team can help you design a great onboarding program for your organization.

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Doug Blizzard, MBA, SPHR, SHRM-SCP serves as CAI’s Vice President of Membership, and has been with CAI for more than 15 years. Doug is well-versed in the world of HR from compliance issues to workforce management to aligning business objectives with HR. He strives to constantly improve the member experience and provide employers with the confidence needed to turn fears and opportunities into practical actions and results. If your HR team could benefit from some guidance, you’ll want to learn more about CAI.

 

Recruiting is not rocket science, or is it?

Tuesday, June 21st, 2016

recruiting_the_bestPerhaps you’ve heard the name Elon Musk. He’s got quite a résumé. Musk is the CEO of SpaceX, an American aerospace manufacturer and space transport services company. His company builds rockets that send people and cargo into space.  Musk is realizing his vision at SpaceX by building simple and relatively inexpensive reusable rockets that go into space multiple times. He hopes to achieve turnaround time capabilities that are similar to commercial airliners.

Oh, by the way, Musk is also the CEO and product architect of Tesla Motors and cofounder of PayPal.

I tell you this because of how Elon Musk views the importance of hiring great talent. Musk’s recruiting strategy at SpaceX is to demand the best person on the planet — whether they were there to build a rocket or serve ice cream on campus.

Dolly Singh, SpaceX’s former Director of Talent quoted Musk as saying, “Find me the single best person on the freaking planet, then convince me why out of how many billion people on the planet that this is that guy.”  Singh continued, “And he does that even if it’s the cook. When we built a yogurt booth inside of SpaceX, he said, ‘Go to Pinkberry and find me the employee of the month, and I want to hire the employee of the month.’”

The point is, Musk as one of the most innovative and successful business leaders in the world, is still laser-focused on hiring great talent. He understands that bringing in mediocre talent will likely prevent him from realizing his dreams.

The late Steve Jobs, cofounder, CEO and Chairman of Apple Inc. believed in hiring A players.  According to Jobs, “A small team of A+ players can run circles around a giant team of B and C players.”  A-players are motivated, engaged and creative. They are performance-driven and have high expectations for themselves and for others. B and C-players, on the other hand, often do just enough to get by and to be paid for it.

We can learn a valuable lesson from Musk, and Jobs…Settling for ‘so-so’ talent will likely get you ‘so-so’ results. So the next time you are looking to hire someone, think like a rocket scientist and hire only the best.

CAI helps more than 1,000 North Carolina employers with their HR needs including talent acquisition process or strategies.  Contact CAI today!

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Tom Sheehan brings 20+ years of extensive, broad based strategic, tactical and practical HR experience to CAI’s Advice & Resolution team.  He advises HR and other business leaders on talent management, organizational effectiveness, employee engagement, M&A’s, and employee relations.

Creating a Consumer Experience for Candidates and Employees

Thursday, May 26th, 2016

We are all aware of the changing dynamics in recruitment, employment and retention.  Companies should think of potential applicants and employeesRecruiting_and_Retention as consumers and create an experience that meets the candidate/employee needs as well as company needs to attract and retain the talent they need.

Technology, globalization, and the increased demand for top talent have changed the workplace landscape.  People can market themselves and access  information on companies and job opportunities to “shop” for what best aligns with their desires for organizational fit and personal growth.  That makes it more important than ever to think of candidates/employees as consumers and to make their experience a “delightful” one.

We have heard a lot recently about transparency.  Candidates searching for job opportunities want to learn as much as possible about potential employers up front.   Social media has made it easier for candidates to search for information on prospective employers (and vice versa).  What information is available to candidates online regarding your company from an employee feedback, social responsibility, and culture, etc. perspective?  How do you manage your organization’s social media profile?

After putting the best foot forward to hire and on-board top candidates that are the best fit for your organization, the consumer efforts shouldn’t stop here.  Treating employees as consumers and being interested in their aspirations and needs supports efforts to retain and engage employees.

According to Steve Lopez, Manpower Group, Companies talk about retention, but the culture does not always support that.  The rewards, measurement, and work environment often support retaining people in a job rather than retaining people within the organization. He proposes a consumer model for employee retention with the following components:

  • The User Experience – what are the goals, objectives and motivations for considering the job and staying with the company?
  • Content – Do you openly share the company culture, job content and expectations, opportunities for advancement and growth?
  • Functionality – What systems are in place to meet the user needs on a day-to-day basis in terms of exchange of information to support organizational needs as well as employee needs (two-way communication, receptive to employee feedback/suggestions, development plans)?
  • Interaction/Information/Navigation – Make resources available throughout the employee/consumer experience to provide what employees need to do their jobs.  This starts with the on-boarding process to educate new employees about the organization, to inform employees how to best obtain responses to their questions, inform them of tools they need and how to access various resources, etc.
  • Visual Experience – Does the desired visual experience for the employee reflect your company brand, web presence, culture, and the physical work space?

By approaching your employees as consumers you can create a world class experience and culture for your entire workforce, which enables positive business results. CAI can help with your company with talent acquisition, talent management, developing a better workplace and more.

(Source: Rethinking Retention, Steve Lopez, Manpower Group)

Assessing New Graduates When Hiring

Tuesday, May 17th, 2016

Interviews typically focus on both the education and the work experience of the candidate. In the case of recent graduates, however, the work experience is often not as much a factor to behiring recent graduates considered.

Below are some ideas that you could integrate into your interview process with new graduates that may provide additional insight into their readiness for entering the workforce and your organization.

What do you plan to contribute to the organization?

Ask your candidate what they feel they can contribute as a new hire, knowing what they know about your organization already and applying their education to this position.

Demonstrate job-specific skills

If the opening is in marketing, ask them to prepare a press release about the organization. If the opening is for a software engineer, provide a short test to assess their skill level.

Temp to perm

Many companies will bring an employee on first as a contractor to assess their skills and performance before making a permanent offer of employment.

Interview outside of the box

Invite a candidate to lunch with a current client or ask them to review a live proposal the company is working on and provide their input. This will give you an idea of how the candidate responds to different, non-standard interview situations and how well they think on their feet.

Focus less on experience, more on trainability

Naturally, most new graduates will not have a lot of experience in the beginning. Focus the interview questions and evaluate their responses around their ability to be trained for the current opening. Can they take direction? Do they appear to be open-minded? Are they eager to learn?

Provide a real world problem to solve

During the interview process, pair the candidate with an employee who is currently working on a problem in their field of study. Get feedback from the employee on how well they responded under pressure and if they were able to contribute to the process. Their ideas do not have to solve the problem, or even be good ideas. The more important thing is that they had ideas and were able to collaborate with others.

Are we a good fit for you?

Most interviews focus on why the candidate is a good fit for the company. Turn it around and ask the candidate why the company would be a good fit for them. This will provide some insight as to what they are expecting from your organization and what interests them about the job.  This insight may also help with retention down the road, should an offer of employment be extended.

renee

 

CAI Advice & Resolution team member Renee Watkins is a seasoned HR professional with a diverse background in Human Resource. Renee provides CAI members with practical advice in a wide-range of human resource functions including conflict resolution, compliance and regulatory issues, and employee relations.