Archive for the ‘Human Resources Management’ Category

Unlocking LinkedIn’s Recruiting Potential

Thursday, March 26th, 2015

HR on Demand Team Member Carolyn Ulrich shares helpful tips for using LinkedIn as a recruiting tool:

linkedin and recruitingAs a recruiter for CAI, social media plays an invaluable role in my career. While we can arguably debate the usefulness of Facebook and Twitter, no one can deny that Linkedin is the holy grail of professional social networks.

Originally launched in May of 2003, Linkedin was created as the professional response to MySpace, gaining only a few new members a day. Within the first 3 years, Linkedin had 20 million users and surpassed MySpace in 2011 with over 33 million. Within the past 4 years, Linkedin has grown to more than 347 million users in over 200 countries and is the largest professional networking site in the world.

By investing a little time and effort into Linkedin, you can take your recruiting efforts to the next level. Here are my top suggestions on how to unleash the full recruiting potential of LinkedIn:

Start with a great profile!

Take the time to invest in a good headline and descriptive summary that helps people understand who you are and what you do. Don’t be afraid to highlight pictures, videos, presentations, skills, recommendations, certifications and clearances that will stand out to others in your profession. This will make you seem more credible and in turn, more approachable.

Expand your Connections!

Don’t be shy about accepting invitations from people you’ve met and even sometimes those that you haven’t. The more connections you have, the more users will be able to see you in their 2nd and 3rd degree network. Make it a point to reach out and connect with people you have heard about or met at events, trainings and conferences. Remember, there’s only 6 degrees of separation!

Post Often!  

Is something interesting happening with your company or in your office? POST IT! Once you have built your network connections make use of all your connections and post content as it relates to you, your profession and your company. Make sure you’re also posting jobs on your page and highlight why you LOVE your company! Never underestimate the power of social media. If you’re always posting about how much you love your job, your connections perceptions of your company will fall in line. Even connections that aren’t actively looking for a new position might be interested so don’t be afraid to put that job in front of them!

Leverage Your Connections!

Send notes to your connections that may be a great fit for your job openings. But make sure you’re not being too aggressive…. No one likes to be sold and you don’t want them to look at your messages like spam. This will keep you current with your connections and is a great FREE marketing tool!

Our recruiting team is dedicated to helping you with all of your recruiting needs. Whether it’s learning more about leveraging Linkedin as a recruiting tool, having us recruit for and fill your vacant positions, or simply answering a few questions, we’re here to help! Please feel free to contact our recruiting team directly at 919- 431-6084 or jill.feldman@capital.org.

Photo Source: Link Humans

 

 

10 HR Practices that Destroy Small Business Productivity – Misguided Meetings

Tuesday, March 24th, 2015

In today’s video blog, CAI’s VP of Membership, Doug Blizzard, continues his series on HR practices that destroy productivity.  This month’s focus is misguided meetings, and he starts the video by giving examples of what misguided meetings might look like.

Doug then shares that Salary.com for Business recently surveyed over 3,200 employees, asking them to rank their biggest time wasters at work. The number one reason, with 47 percent of participants agreeing, was attending too many meetings.

Running bad meetings isn’t due to a lack of available resources, Doug says in the video.   There are several books and other learning tools that offer predictable meeting advice. However, meetings with good elements, such as a detailed agenda or clear purpose to solve an issue, can also go south and waste valuable time.

Doug offers insight from business expert Pat Lencioni who argues that most meetings lack drama. The expert suggests putting the more controversial issues at the beginning of the meeting and seeking solutions before moving on to the next topic.

Another reason why meetings are often time consuming is that they lack context and purpose. Doug suggests getting into a rhythm by scheduling reoccurring, tightly-run meetings with your employees. The meetings should happen as scheduled and with specific agendas.  This will help you focus on what’s important and solve problems faster.

So stop letting bad meetings kill productivity at your office.  If you need help around your company’s meeting or communication strategy, please reach out to our Advice and Resolution Team  at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746.

Drugs, Alcohol and the ADA

Thursday, March 12th, 2015

Advice and Resolution Team Member John Gupton shares helpful information about the ADA and what the law allows in regard to drugs and alcohol.

John Gupton, General Counsel and HR Advisor

John Gupton, General Counsel and HR Advisor

In general, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) prohibits covered employers from discriminating against a “qualified individual with a disability” in regard to job applications, hiring, advancement, discharge, compensation, training, or other terms, conditions, or privileges of employment. The ADA requires employers to make “reasonable accommodations” to the known physical or mental limitations of an otherwise qualified individual with a disability, unless to do so would impose an “undue hardship” upon the employer.

The ADA specifically allows employers to prohibit the use of alcohol or illegal drugs in the workplace and require that employees not be under the influence. Employers may test for the use of illegal drugs under the ADA. Employers also may maintain and enforce rules prohibiting employees from being under the influence of alcohol in the workplace and may conduct alcohol testing for this purpose if they have a reasonable belief that an employee may be under the influence of alcohol at work.

While current illegal drug users and alcoholics who cannot safely perform their jobs are not protected by the ADA, those who have been rehabilitated or are participating in a supervised rehabilitation program and are not currently using drugs or who are erroneously regarded as engaging in the illegal use of drugs, are covered. Thus, an employer may be required to make reasonable accommodation to recovering alcoholics, for example, by allowing time off to attend Alcoholics Anonymous meetings.

For more information about the ADA, go to http://j.mp/dis-d. If you have questions about the ADA, please contact a member of CAI’s Advice and Resolution team at 919‑878‑9222 or 336‑668‑7746.

5 Employee Engagement Activities for the Spring

Tuesday, March 10th, 2015

spring engagement activitiesThe winter months can leave people feeling down and dreary, and these feelings can carry over into the workplace and impact work performance levels. Employees start to need a pick-me-up to increase engagement and motivation. As spring approaches, employers have many opportunities to participate in fun and engaging outings and activities with employees.

Here are 5 spring activities that will increase employee engagement:

1. Plant a company flower garden

This can be a fun way to get your employees outside and working together, while enhancing the appearance of the company grounds. If your office location prevents this, try planting trees in your local community.

2. Volunteer to walk dogs at your local animal shelter

Many local animal shelters are always looking for volunteers to walk the dogs (and cats sometimes), and this could be a great outdoor activity for your employees to do together that would also benefit a good cause.

3. Host a March Madness office potluck lunch

Choose a day when there is a basketball game on and invite employees to come and eat sporting their favorite team’s gear. This allows all employees to get involved even if they do not love basketball, they can come and eat!

4. Attend a local baseball game

For a company of 100+ people, this can be a good activity for employees in a specific department to do together. Whether a local minor team, major league team or college team, this activity will get everyone outdoors and away from all of the stress at the office.

5. Throw a company picnic

Have a picnic at a local park or lake during the nice spring weather and encourage employees to bring their families. This will give employees the opportunity to spend time with their families and colleagues at the same time.

These five activities will bring employees together during the spring while taking advantage of the warm weather and all of the opportunities that the season has to offer. Watch as your employees spirits perk up and their work begins to blossom from these engaging spring activities.

For additional ideas for employee engagement activities, please call a member of CAI’s Advice and Resolution Team at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746.

Photo Source: Woody Hibbard

 

Innovate or Stagnate: Living your Passion

Tuesday, February 17th, 2015

The following post is from Peter Metzner. Through seminars and consulting, Peter helps leaders, teams and organizations better engage and align staff to business drivers and their overall mission. He is sharing his presentation Innovate or Stagnate: Leadership Skills for Today at the 2015 HR Management Conference on March 4 and March 5 at the McKimmon Center in Raleigh.

Business PeopleI once heard at a Symposium that:  “Genius is focused passion”.

To grow, to develop and become the best at your “art” is a meaningful calling or vocation.  Joseph Campbell writes: “Art is the making of things well.  The aim of Art is the perfection of the object”.

He also writes: “if you follow your bliss, you will always have your bliss money or not. If you follow money you may lose it and you will have nothing” (J. Campbell Reflections on the Art of Living” p. 39)

Ideally, to successfully innovate; we need to feel passionate about and love what we do. We also need to feel our work – our “art” is beneficial to others.    That is the rocket fuel that can propel us to new heights.

What keeps teams or individuals from performing optimally?

Sadly only 30 percent of employees in America feel engaged at work, according to a 2013 report by Gallup.  For many, work is a depleting, dispiriting experience, and in many ways, it’s getting worse.  Demand for our time is increasingly exceeding our capacity — draining us of the energy we need to bring our skill and talent fully to life. “Increased competitiveness and a leaner, post-recession work force add to the pressures. The rise of digital technology is perhaps the biggest influence, exposing us to an unprecedented flood of information and requests that we feel compelled to read and respond to at all hours of the day and night”.   (http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/01/opinion/sunday/why-you-hate-work.)

To maintain engagement it is important to have enough rest and renewal to be productive. Over- work, stress and a lack of capacity leads to burnout.  Interpersonal conflict, unaware leadership and not feeling valued or appreciated add to the malaise that cause disengagement, lack of commitment and turnover.

When individuals and teams feel connected to a shared vision and mission that is inspiring and larger than themselves, positive energy and action is released. When relationships are trusting and safe enough to give and receive feedback and engage in constructive conflict; everyone becomes “smarter” than anyone one.  With trust, along with collaborative working relationships; individuals and teams have a greater sense of autonomy, input and buy in to their activities.  Harvard psychologist Kurt Lewin PhD, writes:  “When we are in a supportive environment we are much better equipped to deal with the complexities of our working lives”

As times change; technology advances and new applications and markets will emerge. Yet we need to always keep the timeless qualities that made us successful in the first place. Excitement, energy, common purpose and dedication come from feeling that we are doing what we do best, being challenged to be better in the service of something larger than ourselves.  A real and often forgotten challenge to keeping engagement and passion alive is not only to encourage but to ensure that the work-life balance of staff is maintained.

“When we are completely caught up in something, you become oblivious to the things around you, or to the passage of time.  It is this absorption in what you are doing that frees your unconscious and releases your creative imaginations”.   Rollo May, The Courage to Create

This is the place where synchronicities and “magic” happen.

In addition to innovation through engagement, the 2015 HR Management Conference will feature presentations on making technology choices, insights on the future of work, strengthening organizational performance and more. Visit www.capital.org/hrconf to view the complete agenda and read more about conference speakers. Register today!

 

Using Video Job Descriptions as a Recruiting Tool

Thursday, February 5th, 2015

Advice and Resolution team member Renee’ Watkins shares how a Video Job Description can add a personal touch to your company’s next job opening.

Renee' Watkins, HR Advisor

Renee’ Watkins, HR Advisor

Video Job Descriptions (VJDs) are nothing more than a short video clip used to describe a specific opening to a potential applicant. These are not meant to replace the typical text narrative of the job description and desired qualifications. Instead, they are meant to enhance and present a more personal viewpoint of a job opening.

Text narratives are often developed using the actual responsibilities and duties of the position, coupled with the required and preferred experience and education levels, with some help and guidance from both Human Resources and the hiring manager. Today’s job applicant lives in a world of Facetime, Skype, YouTube and other communications involving face-to-face contact across a website or wireless network. To some, the written word has become boring and uninteresting.

A personal touch can be a great way to capture the attention of a potential job seeker. That can be accomplished by having an existing team member describe their experience with the company or by having the manager describe the position and their management style in a VJD. This type of medium establishes a personal rapport with the candidate as if the manager or employee were speaking directly to the candidate. It also makes an impression that your organization is progressive when it comes to technology and social media.

The many advantages of using VJDs to enhance your job descriptions include:

  • Message presented by someone working with or in this role on a daily basis
  • Projects energy and excitement about the position not present in the written word
  • Immediately establishes a connection between the applicant and the team
  • Candidates will typically watch a video but may only skim a narrative
  • Viewable and sharable on any mobile platform – extends reach to more people
  • Facility video tours can generate excitement and interest
  • Simple and inexpensive to create – does not require professionals
  • Consider enhancing your next few job opening announcements by creating a VJD as a link from the job description on your website career page and social media profiles.

Need some help with recruiting talent for your company? Please call a member of CAI’s Advice and Resolution Team at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746. The team is available 24 hours each day!

Advice for Handling Love at Work

Tuesday, February 3rd, 2015

The following post is by Bruce Clarke, CAI’s CEO and President. The article originally appeared in Bruce’s News and Observer Column, The View from HR.

love at workCupid may be especially busy on Valentine’s Day, but the icon of love is unstoppable year-round in the workplace.

Statistics show that one-third of employees will date someone at work and up to 20 percent will find their spouse or partner at work.

Managers should recognize that people will fall in like or love at work, and there is no law or best practice requiring you to prevent or end these relationships (good luck with that, anyway).

Most employers understand this dynamic, but know the emotions involved can cause real workplace problems if mishandled.

Events are hard to predict. Office romance is known as a disproportionate cause of workplace violence.

When one or both romantics are married to other people who may also work for the same company, you have a potentially explosive situation.

Perceptions of favoritism may cause problems, too. Employee morale is easily jeopardized, especially if one of the lovebirds is a manager with the power to promote and give raises to his or her favorite Valentine.

What does your company policy say about consensual workplace romance? You need to stay in compliance or get guidance.

Less than 15 percent of policies prohibit workplace romances, but all employers want to ensure there is no harassment or pressure.

Stay focused on your policy and on the workplace impact of behaviors. Private conversations with the individuals involved to clear the air and state the company’s position without preaching can be difficult but very important.

Put the burden on the employees to prevent bad situations. Carefully consider with HR any issue around the transfer or termination of one or the other.

Romantic employees: Be the one to deliver the news (and not become the subject of water cooler talk or a security camera tape). People will know before you think they know, and they love to gossip. Be the one with a proactive plan to give your managers, focused on policy and preventing complications.

Granted, your situation may be different from others’. But think about how management and co-workers are likely to react, not just how you want them to react.

Photo Source: Lori Branham

The Role of Minority Coaching in Your Succession Planning Strategy

Tuesday, January 27th, 2015

The following post is from Val Boston of Boston and Associates. His professional background spans more than 25 years in business and leadership roles. He is sharing his presentation Diversity and Inclusion: A Business Strategy at the 2015 HR Management Conference on March 4 and March 5 at the McKimmon Center in Raleigh.

Diverse business group meetingSuccession Planning addresses your organization’s need to strategically prepare for the healthy transition of leadership. These plans are typically linked to a talent management strategy of effective recruiting, developing, retaining and preparing potential leaders for advancement. Considering the rapidly changing demographics in the workplace, special consideration should be paid to the Historically Underrepresented Groups (HUGs) in your talent pool.

Characteristics and Challenges of Successful Coaching Interventions

Executive coaching (or employee coaching or leadership coaching) is certainly not a new concept. Effective coaching occurs when the coach and the colleague have mutual trust and respect; where communications clear and understood by all parties simultaneously; when the colleague is well on track to achieving their professional goals; and the colleague is “dialed in” into the controllable behaviors that generate success.

Most challenges arise with coaching interventions  because the market changes are more rapid and unpredictable than ever before; dramatic events may compromise the integrity of the coaching intervention; the continued “buy-in” by the colleague may become out-of-sync and no one understands why; and when basic objectives are not being met.

Why Minority Executive Coaching? Scenario:  Jordan is a talented employee who is from a HUG. He has outstanding educational credentials and has an excellent employee track record to date. He is assigned an internal mentor or coach as part of his professional development who is not from his HUG. Though the mentor/coach can provide guidance and direction, the personal relationship and trust needed may not develop that would give Jordan all the “tools” he needs for further growth in the organization. The coach may not be able to provide him with the “unwritten rules” or truly and deeply be able to relate to Jordan at all levels.

Minority coaching targets HUG employees and can provide the “missing ingredient”, and can many times provide more relevancy. Since many organizations view coaching as an integral component of talent management and development strategies, this focus can enhance existing internal mentorship and coaching programs. Organizations can provide this resource to identified or self-selected colleagues as part of their development plans. Talent that can be developed to assume more responsibilities over time is a win-win, can increase retention rates of high potentials, while developing talent pools to fill key roles.

In addition to diversity, the 2015 HR Management Conference will feature presentations on making technology choices, insights on the future of work, strengthening organizational performance and more. Visit www.capital.org/hrconf to view the complete agenda and read more about conference speakers. Register today!

Photo Source: Ruth Sanderson

Medical Care is not a Priority to Millennials

Tuesday, January 20th, 2015

millennials workMillennials put a lower priority on medical care than other generations according to a new analysis from Aon Hewitt. However, this generation is also more likely to want their employers to play a strong role in supporting their overall health and wellbeing. The data comes from the 2014 Consumer Health Mindset report from Aon Hewitt, the National Business Group on Health, and the Futures Company. Participants included 2,700 U.S. employees and their dependents. The joint survey analyzed the health and wellness perspectives, behaviors and attitudes of employees from different generations.

The survey showed that Millennials are the least likely of the generations to participate in activities focused on prevention and maintaining or improving physical health. Some specifics of that data included 54 percent of them had a physical in the last 12 months, compared to 60 percent of Generation X and 73 percent of Baby Boomers. Additionally, only 39 percent say preventive care is one of the most important things to do to stay healthy in comparison to 49 percent of Generation X and 69 percent of Baby Boomers.

With only 21 percent participating, this group is also not as likely to participate in healthy eating/weight management programs, compared to 23 percent of Generation X and 28 percent of Baby Boomers.  However, 63 percent of Millennials are likely to engage in regular exercise, compared to 52 percent of Generation X and 49 percent of Baby Boomers.

“Given their younger age, most Millennials are relatively healthy, so they may not feel a sense of urgency to go to the doctor regularly or eat a well-balanced diet,” said Ray Baumruk, employee research leader at Aon Hewitt. “However, the lack of health prevention and maintenance when they’re young may lead to greater health risks as they get older. Employers should communicate the importance of participating in health related activities now to avoid serious health issues later in life.”

While they do not feel an urgent sense of preventative care, the data shows that Millennials are the most likely to embrace support from employers in their overall health and wellbeing compared to other generations. Fifty-two percent of participants from this generation say “living or working in a healthy environment” influences their personal health, while only 42 percent of Generation X and 35 percent of Baby Boomers feel the same way.

If you want to help your Millennials reach their fitness and overall health goals, while also making them aware of the importance of prevention and improving their health, Aon Hewitt experts suggests the following steps for employers:

  • Understand motivation. It’s important for employers to understand what motivates and engages this group. Fifty-five percent of Millennials report their motivation is “to look good,” and not as much to “avoid illness.” Employers should modify their strategy and communications to show how poor health can impact an individual’s energy and appearance.
  • Reach your audience correctly. Millennials are significantly more likely to prefer mobile apps, text, or popular social channels, such as Facebook and Twitter to access both general and personal health information. Organizations should also take advantage of apps and mobile-friendly websites to help engage employees in health and wellness campaigns.
  • Easy and convenient is key. Forty percent of Millennials say they are more likely to participate in health and wellness programs if they are “easy or convenient to do.” Employers should remove barriers to helping this generation create good health choices and habits by focusing on programs that meet their work/life balance.
  • Competition for fun. Millennials are the generation most likely to be interested in “friendly competitions.” Employers may want to explore ways they can include competitions to motivate and engage Millennials, such as company-wide well-being or fitness challenges.

For additional tips to help keep your Millennial staff engaged, please call a member of CAI’s Advice and Resolution team at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746.

Photo Source: ITU Pictures

Persistence and Success

Tuesday, January 13th, 2015

The following post is by Bruce Clarke, CAI’s CEO and President. The article originally appeared in Bruce’s News and Observer Column, The View from HR.

Bruce Clarke, President and CEO

Bruce Clarke, President and CEO

We talk much about education and talent but too little about persistence.

Success as a manager or employee usually has less to do with your degree, your natural talent or even your intelligence. It has less to do with where you were raised and whether you were privileged. It has much more to do with your own personal level of persistence and determination.

Yes, a degree may be necessary for certain roles or licenses, and it never hurts to have every advantage growing up, including involved parents and excellent teachers. However, personal determination means more to your successes and failures than any other factor.

Give me a qualified and determined person over a highly educated person with low “give a hoot” any day.

Each inspirational story you see proves my point. These success stories are about people who overcame a challenge and made something work for them or others. Overcoming obstacles. Pushing further, harder and more often than the average person. Finding ways to go at it in different ways. Saying yes rather than no. Persistence.

Look no further than your own extended family or group of friends for talented people (maybe geniuses) who struggle to make their lives and work function. You also know someone with modest resources who worked hard and long to achieve his or her version of success.

Ask any manager why so many good ideas sit idle. Do you know employees who stop and rest at each hurdle, making a nest and setting up camp until dislodged?

Think of the last team meeting where more time was spent on the lunch menu than on tasks at hand, the reasons things did not happen, and why more time was needed to execute projects rather than enjoy incremental success from dogged determination.

Leonard Mlodinow, the author of “The Drunkard’s Walk: How Randomness Rules Our Lives,” helped me see the power of persistence another way. Because so many factors in the workplace and business are uncontrollable, unpredictable and even random, persistence increases the chance that a good idea (or good person) will take hold as conditions change.

Think of it like this: The job openings and available candidates at any point in time are fixed. The lack of a good fit today means nothing about next month, when the candidate pool and job openings have changed. Persist.

Success at work is influenced by many factors. It never hurts to have education, talent and other advantages. Sometimes unfair things happen. But the surest way to take what you have and maximize your effect wherever you are today is to double your level of persistence. Good managers recognize the power of determination and look for it in hiring and promotions.

In 1932, at the depth of the Great Depression, former President Calvin Coolidge said that persistence “has solved and always will solve the problems of the human race.” It is the one variable entirely within your control. Start with your role in your workplace and enjoy the difference it will make.