Archive for the ‘Human Resources Management’ Category

Create a Flexible Work Environment With These 6 Tips

Thursday, October 1st, 2015
Molly Hegeman, VP of HR Services

Molly Hegeman, VP of HR Services

In today’s post Molly Hegeman, CAI’s Vice President of  HR Services, shares helpful strategies for companies looking to offer more flexible scheduling to its employees.

When CAI first surveyed about flexible schedules in 2012, 48% of companies responded that they offered some form alternative work schedules.  In the 2014 NC Policies and Benefits Survey, that number had grown to 52%. In a recent discussion that I had with a group of HR professionals in Jacksonville, NC, this market trend got a lot of interest. Alternative work arrangements are definitely gaining popularity with employees, as evidenced by feedback in the Employee Opinion Surveys that CAI conducts.  All levels and types of employees are voicing a greater interest in flexibility with their hours, the work environment, etc.

With the convenience of mobile and wireless devices, many employees can work nearly 24/7. It seems only right that we should recognize the efforts of employees who check and respond to emails, complete a project after hours, etc. by giving them flexibility with their time.  So, what does that mean for employers?  More specifically, how do you make it work, especially in traditional organizations?

It used to be that companies would only allow a policy to exist if it affected all employees. I don’t think that’s practical anymore. Now don’t get me wrong, I believe all employees should be treated fairly. But fairly does not mean equal in all situations. For example, you may be able to offer a work from home schedule to an employee whose work is fairly independent and not contingent upon physically being in the office. That may not be practical, however, for the receptionist whose main job function is physically greeting customers/clients. It’s probably not reasonable for the organization to set up a virtual/Skype situation.  But, that employee could be afforded the option of a modified work shift and/or remote phone coverage (leaving only limited in person reception duties to be rearranged when needed).

So what’s an organization to do when it hasn’t previously offered flexible scheduling or remote work arrangements?

  1. Understand the options like flex time (schedule-based: compressed work week, flex hours, etc.) and flex location (location-based: telework, working remote).
  2. Consider why you would introduce flex work arrangements and what problem you are trying to solve (downsizing office space, employee morale, etc.).
  3. Ensure your management team supports schedule and/or location-based flex arrangements
  4. Define eligibility and the business situations that support the flex arrangements (even if you start in selected departments within your organization)
  5. Establish guidelines and procedures for your employees and managers to follow
  6. Continuously evaluate the flex arrangements and impact on employees, morale, productivity, business needs, etc.

In a world where there are competing interests and demands on all of us, why not consider the opportunity to help support your employees’ work-life effectiveness?  Whether you introduce small changes or a full program, the positive reaction and response from your employees (and managers) will be returned ten-fold. Flex work arrangements are a great strategy in attracting, retaining and motivating your workforce!

Want more information on our survey findings? Need help creating or updating your flexible schedule policy? Feel free to contact me, Molly Hegeman, directly at (919) 713-5263 or

The Do’s and Don’ts of Managing a Multigenerational Workforce

Tuesday, September 29th, 2015

“Never in history has a workforce had four generations working together —until now.”

                –Dr. Kevin Snyder, 2015 Compensation & Benefits Conference

Diverse business group meetingSo who are these four generations working so closely together? In most offices, you will find the:

  • Matures- born from 1925 to 1946
  • Baby Boomers- born from 1946 to 1964
  • Generation Xers- born from 1965 to 1980
  • Generation Yers or ‘Millennials’- born from 1981 to late 1990s

Each generation comes with their unique set of stereotypes and stigmas. While the Matures are seen as loyal but lousy with technology, the Millennial crew seem to attract the opposite perception. While many of these stereotypes are exaggerated, it is undoubtedly true that each generation possesses a distinct set of characteristics from one another.

For many managers, this could sounds like a bit of a headache. After all, who wants a bunch of groups with differing ideas, schedules, and motivations working together? It may sound like a nightmare, but it could actually be an advantage if these differences of habits are leveraged correctly.

To effectively manage your workplace, follow these Do’s and Don’ts  to ensure the generations are working in tandem, and not against, one another.

Do know what each generation is looking for

Knowing your audience is a huge key to success. By understanding what each generation is looking for in a job, you can better manage their expectations and vastly improve their career contentment. Conduct surveys that poll your employees on what they find most rewarding about work. If you find that a large share of your Millennial employees are looking for a strong work culture, organize team lunches or wellness activities for them to take part in. If you find that many of your Mature employees desire one-on-one guidance, try to give them the extra personal attention that fulfills them. With a greater understanding of what makes each generation tick, you will be creating a more engaged, dynamic and productive workplace.

Don’t encourage generational separation

We all enjoy talking to someone we have a lot in common with, and shared age is a great and easy way to bond with a fellow employee. While many employees seem to naturally bond with coworkers of similar ages, it is important to discourage any extreme separation based around age in the office. By combining the varying tastes, attitudes and experiences of the multiple generations at your disposal, you will be fostering a healthy and collaborative dialogue between your employees. Though there is always a potential for conflict, your business would be missing out on the greater potential for new and dynamic teamwork by keeping the generations from working together.

Do recognize their varying strengths

Maybe you have a Millennial employee who’s great with technology, but not so effective when it comes to face-to-face interactions. Or the opposite situation could be true of a Boomer who thrives in personal interactions with others, but understandably lags behind in the tech department. Rather than spreading your employees too thin and expecting the Millennial and Boomer to become well-versed in their respective areas of weakness, recognize their independent strengths and leverage them together. If that means having the Millennial put together the PowerPoint and the Boomer giving the presentation, so be it. By appealing to each of the generation’s strengths, and not holding them hostage to their weaknesses, you will be doing your business and your employees a huge favor.

Don’t assume the generational stereotypes

As we said above, many of the generations possess differing ideals, skills and habits from one another. While it is important to recognize and leverage these varying strengths when you can identify them, do not assume that an employee will lack a certain skill or experience simply because it is not usually ascribed to their generation. By pigeonholing your employees to certain spheres along generational lines, you could be wasting heaps of potential. Be open-minded about each generation, and allow their strengths and experiences to present themselves in due course rather than forcing them into a box in which they may not belong.

If you would like to further discuss how you can more effectively manage a multigenerational workplace, please call our Advice and Resolution team today at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746.

Are You a Micromanager or a Macromanager?

Thursday, September 24th, 2015
Renee' Watkins, HR Advisor

Renee’ Watkins, HR Advisor

In today’s post, Advice and Resolution team member Renee’ Watkins shares some tips for adopting a Macromanaging mindset when overseeing employees. 

Are you a Micromanager?  Do others consider you to be?  Hopefully, the answer to both of these questions is “No.”  The term Micromanager is widely thought to be one of the most unflattering labels you can have if you manage people.  Micromanagers typically involve themselves so deeply into the smallest details of every project they manage it actually inhibits productivity and creates a very unpleasant workplace for the team as a whole.

Granted, not being a Micromanager is better than being a Micromanager.  But is there something even better?  Yes!  A Macromanager.

Macromanagers deal with employees more efficiently, taking advantage of their individuality and contributing strengths to the overall team.  Macromanagers provide a work environment which allows a team to work together and empowers them to not only make decisions, but to also make mistakes and to learn from both.  This creates a bi-directional feeling of trust, while maintaining a sense of employee engagement and generating results.

How can you become a Macromanager?  How can you make the transition all the way from Micromanager to Macromanager?  Try implementing these four traits of a Macromanager:

Focus on The Big Picture – Micromanagers get too deep in the weeds of a project rather than looking at things from a 10,000-foot viewpoint.  To be a good Macromanager, focus more of your energy and attention on the organization’s direction and strategy for the future.  In doing so, you can develop creative ideas on how to get there and trust your team to use their collective strengths to work out the details for success.

Understand Your Audience – Micromanagers tend to micromanage everyone, even those who do not need it. Macromanagers may occasionally need to provide more detailed guidance to a team member who is less experienced. When you see that team member begin to “get it,” step back before entering “Micromanager Mode.”  Have a stronger member of your team work with and mentor the less experienced employees.

Observe – Watch the progress of your team, keeping your distance.  As an experienced manager, you will recognize the cues that tell you when to engage and when to hold back.  Your responsibility is the successful completion of the project overall, so you should always be involved as a manager, mentor, advisor and member of the team.  Successful people surround themselves with successful people.  Give your team room to succeed and let them know you are there if they need you.

Welcome Feedback – Find a way to ask questions regarding progress without coming across as “interfering.”  As the manager responsible for overall success, you have the right and the responsibility to know what is going on.  Make sure your team understands you are not there to judge or to criticize, but to offer help and observations if and when needed. Open communication should be encouraged.

As a manager, you have larger responsibilities to the organization.  If you ever find yourself getting too deep into the weeds of any one project, you should ask yourself, “What should I be doing in my job that I am not doing?”  Chances are there is something else you should be focusing more time on.  Your employees will thrive and progress more quickly with your guidance rather than your direct involvement.

If you have any more questions regarding the importance of macromanagement, please contact a member of CAI’s Advice and Resolution team at 919‑878‑9222 or 336‑668‑7746.


How to Keep Your Employees Excited About Coming to Work

Tuesday, September 15th, 2015

In today’s post, Advice and Resolution team member Renee’ Watkins shares some helpful tips to keep your workforce engaged!

Renee' Watkins, HR Advisor

Renee’ Watkins, HR Advisor

Actions often speak louder than words, and the simplest, unexpected and sincerest actions at the proper moment can make a significant difference in someone’s day.  Everyone appreciates being recognized in a tangible way with additional compensation or a certificate of appreciation for a job well done.  Studies have shown, however, employees equally appreciate a heartfelt “Good Morning” from a manager to make their day more pleasant.  Here are a few other simple things to get your employee excited about their job and the organization they are a part of:


  • A Pleasant Beginning – employee attitudes throughout the day are influenced with how their day starts. Something as simple as “good morning” or a smile from a supervisor can set the tone for the rest of the day.


  • Take An Interest – take an interest in their lives, acknowledging a sick relative or a graduating son or daughter. Employees are people first, before employees.


  • Pay Special Attention – recognize your employees for doing a good job and offer to help them grow. Likewise, be candid with your employees when they are not measuring up and offer to help them improve.


  • Show Flexibility – offer a work shift change or additional time off to an employee who is dealing with a temporary change in their personal life to give them time to adjust.


  • Demonstrate Consideration – start a meeting later if an employee is running late to work due to traffic or a sick child. Consider your own feelings if the situation were reversed. Respect given is respect gained.


  • Sensitivity Matters – help employees who need a change at their workstation to be more comfortable. A change in office climate or a new chair can show how much you notice their environment and how much you care.


  • Be A Part of the Team – show up to employee group functions such as group lunches, birthday celebrations or after-hours gatherings to which you are invited to attend. Supervising the team includes being a part of the team.


  • Keep Your Perspective – do not take your stress out on your employees. Put things in perspective, take a deep breath and smile. If you remain at ease, they will remain at ease also.


  • Open Your Door – maintain an open door for your employees to come to you with a problem or idea. Listen intently, and offer a solution or advice if you can. If you cannot help, show appreciation for their coming to you. If they have a good idea, help them to move it forward.


  • Say Thank You – thank your team members as often as you can for the job they do. Expressing your appreciation will lift your team to new heights, and success will follow.


If you have questions regarding employee engagement, please contact a member of CAI’s Advice and Resolution team at 919‑878‑9222 or 336‑668‑7746.

Is the Nine to Five Dying?

Tuesday, September 8th, 2015

recruitingIs the traditional nine-to-five work schedule a thing of the past? It appears a lot of workers seem to think so.  A recent CareerBuilder survey of more than 1,000 IT, financial services, sales, and business workers reveals 63 percent of workers believe the traditional nine-to-five model is an “outdated concept.”

The survey, which was conducted online by Harris Poll from May 14 to June 3, shows how a large share of today’s workers are operating under a much more flexible work schedule than in the past.

And while many bosses may fear the loss of the traditional work frame, they need not panic just yet. While it is true that many employees no longer see the point of coming into the office five days a week, that doesn’t necessarily mean employees have lost interest in their work.

“With improvements in technology that enable employees to check in at any time, from anywhere, it makes sense to allow employees to work outside the traditional nine-to-five schedule,” said Rosemary Haefner, Chief HR Officer of CareerBuilder.

With this ability to access their work documents, calendars, and emails remotely, many of today’s workers see little to no point in sitting behind an office desk to complete their work.

In fact, 50 percent of those surveyed say they “check or respond to work emails outside of work” and nearly 40 percent say they continue to work outside of office hours.

While businesses obviously cannot allow the nine-to-five model to dissolve completely, this growing trend reflects the clear need for more flexibility within employees’ schedules.

“Moving away from a nine-to-five work week may not be possible for some companies (yet), but if done right, allowing employees more freedom and flexibility with their schedules can boost productivity,” said Haefner.

While the long-term effects of moving away from the traditional workweek remain to be seen, there does seem to be an attractive set of benefits to offering employees greater workplace flexibility:

  • Improved sense of loyalty: Employees are likely to be more attached and committed to a workplace that takes their needs for flexibility into consideration, thus resulting in
  • Greater retention: Employees will be more likely to stay in their positions if they feel content and satisfied with the work schedule
  • Heightened morale: Employees will feel more engaged and fulfilled with their work when they are working with a schedule that best suits their needs
  • Around the clock inspiration: Rather than having an employee simply turn “off” of work at 5 o’clock, giving your employees a flexible schedule will allow them to remain open to new ideas and inspiration at all hours of the day.

The nine-to-five isn’t going to disappear any time soon, but it will likely begin to change little by little to match today’s changing technological landscape. The CareerBuilder survey is beginning to show us those little changes, and businesses need to be prepared to adapt to meet them.  With the popularity of the traditional workweek waning and the benefits of workplace flexibility becoming more apparent, businesses may need to “get with the times” before losing out on top talent to more accommodating firms.

If you have any questions about how you can create a more flexible workplace within your company, please call our Advice and Resolution team today at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746.

Keep Millennial Employee Retention Rates High With These 3 Tips

Tuesday, August 25th, 2015

Portrait of three office workers.It’s no secret that Millennials are causing some employers to rethink their views on employee relations and engagement. Growing up with the advent of technology and social media has exposed them to far more corners of the globe than any other generation in history. With the ability to access varying cultures, peoples, and places so readily available throughout their lives, Millennials are not nearly as content as older generations to stay put in one place for an extended period of time.

With Millennials expected to make up nearly half of the nation’s workforce by 2020, it is imperative for HR professionals to develop strategies to mitigate some of this restless energy and improve retention for Millennial employees. Though there is no foolproof plan to keeping Millennials from job hopping, following these simple steps may entice the Gen Y’ers to stick around the office for a little while longer:

  1. Create a flexible work environment

Some say the 9-to-5 is dead. It’s not, but it may need a little tweaking. As we said earlier, Millennials have been shaped by technology.  For this generation, going to a library to retrieve an encyclopedia or a computer lab to write a paper was unnecessary: all the information needed to complete a task was right at their fingertips. This same trend holds true in the office.  Many Millennials simply don’t understand the need to spend hours at a desk every day when they feel they could accomplish just as much in less time working remotely.

While it is important to be in the office, meet the Millennials halfway. Perhaps allow them a day each week to work from home. Remember: everyone’s work habits are different, and there is no one-size-fits-all work model. By recognizing the need for Millennials to work in a flexible environment, you will be creating a space that can adapt to meet their needs and greatly improve their career contentment.

  1. Give them purpose

Having grown up with expanding access to travel, film, the Internet and other media, Millennials are constantly striving to leave their own unique footprint in an increasingly automated, programmed world. In fact, nearly three out of four students polled in a survey considered having “a job where I can make an impact” to be essential to their happiness, as opposed to roughly half of workers. In other words, Millennials measure much of their work fulfillment in relation to the perceived positive impact it has having on the world around them.

Show leadership to your Millennial employees by clearly stating the company’s vision or goals, and what duties or skills they can use to help the company achieve this end. By making Millennials aware of the stakes they have in the organization’s success, they will find fulfillment in their work that could vastly strengthen their satisfaction and loyalty to your organization.

  1. Put together clear expectations of career advancement

Growing up alongside the technology boom, Millennials have always been inclined to look toward the future. When it comes to their careers, this is no exception. Millennials are a competitive crew, so putting clear incentives on the table for possible career advancement will motivate them to put their best work forward and settle in for the long haul. What Millennials may lack in terms of professional experience they more than make up for in enthusiasm and drive. Lay out exactly what’s expected of them in order to advance, and watch them rise to the occasion.

Try to be as transparent as possible about how and when their hard work will be rewarded in the form of promotions, raises, etc. Businesses that invest time and resources into their Millennial employees will earn this generation’s continued loyalty, drive, and unique vision.

If you would like to further discuss how you can improve your company’s retention of Millennial employees, please call our Advice and Resolution team today at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746.

The Problem with Time Off

Tuesday, August 4th, 2015

The following post is by Bruce Clarke, CAI’s CEO and President. The article originally appeared in Bruce’s News and Observer  column, The View from HR.

Bruce Clarke, President and CEO

Bruce Clarke, President and CEO

What could be wrong with time off from work?  Plenty, if you are a manager trying to get things done, or an employee who cannot get time off for family issues.

Time off problems generate phone calls to our HR advisors every day.  Most of the problems come in three categories, each with an employee and employer viewpoint.

Do I Have To?

Government regulations mandate time off in several dozen ways.  No single requirement is back breaking, but their total weight causes employers to dread these regulated requests.  The question often becomes “Do I have to grant the time?”  It depends.

Earned vacation is owed to the employee and the only question is timing.  An employer can deny its use at inconvenient times unless the vacation is to be used during a “Family and Medical Leave” event.  These FMLA requests give employees and their doctors so much power over timing that employee abuse is too common, paid or unpaid.  Even if laws like FMLA do not apply, sick day and personal day policies are common.  Plus, everyone has a personal need now and then.

Help employees understand the business issues so that time off can be made to fit business AND personal needs.  Employees, if you will start out showing concern for business needs and some flexibility on timing, you will find the process is much smoother and more pleasant for all.  It is rare that something has to happen on Monday morning, or on the busiest day of the month.  Everybody wants to be met halfway. (Emergencies are different.)

Do I Want To?

If time off is discretionary, do you want to say “yes” to the employee for an inconvenient day off?  Managers might say “Yes to my best employees and no to my worst.”  You can use some discretion here, maybe rearranging work so that a star can get the day off he or she needs in busy season, but be sure you can defend that choice when the poor performer seeks the same. “Sally works exceptionally hard each day, and you do not” is what you may feel like saying, but refrain.  Describe ways the employee can earn future approvals.

Employees who want time off or certain vacation days in this “discretionary zone” should bring either a good plan for getting needed work done, or a record of always doing so, or both.  I have never met a manager who liked to say no to a personal request if it is reasonable and if the employee always meets them halfway.

Should I?

Maybe no law requires it and maybe the employee does not deserve it based on past behaviors, but sometimes it is good business to grant that inconvenient time off request.  You gain nothing by punishing an employee’s family member, for example.  Maybe you should have dealt with this poor performer more directly last month rather than indirectly punishing him or her through a time off denial today.  It is a judgment call, but denial of needed time off is an act this employee will not soon forget.

Time-off discussions require adult behavior and open discussion on both sides.  Approach your next time off discussion with that in mind.

For additional guidance, please give our Advice and Resolution Team a call at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746.

3 Things I Learned About Recruiting from My Boys and Their Legos

Tuesday, July 28th, 2015

In today’s post, CAI’s Peer Learning Recruiter, Jennifer Montalvo, shares how her two sons help inspire her recruiting methods.

Jennifer Montalvo, Peer Learning Recruiter

Jennifer Montalvo, Peer Learning Recruiter

My boys have thousands, no, hundreds of thousands of Legos and are continuously looking for the “right piece.”  Often, I stand over them baffled that they are arguing about “he got the one I wanted.”  I look at the two of them and pan over the vast sea of dumped Legos and reply with, “Really?  You’re telling me out of all of these pieces, that’s the only one you need?”   The reply, “… but it’s the best one, and it fits where I need it.”

Sometimes all my boys needed to do was look deeper at the structure they were building. They had the power to create whatever it was that they could envision.  Many times there was a piece that was overlooked or missed that would fit a.) just as well b.) better or c.) differently. I have learned a lot from this scenario in regard to recruiting. Here are my three takeaways:

Just as well

  • Chances are, amongst the thousands of pieces sprayed across the floor, a piece just like the one they were seeking was there. They may have had to look just a bit harder. The lesson being – don’t give up too quickly. After all, the vehicle that initially came out of the Lego box had four wheels!


  • After a bit of convincing to “think out of the box” when they couldn’t find the exact same piece, they would come across a piece that actually fit better. They would then find that all the little nodules filled the space and consequently made the foundation of their creation even stronger.


  • Sometimes they would relinquish the desired piece to their sibling, and walk away frustrated and disappointed. However, they would often return with a fresh set of eyes and a different perspective. It was then that their structure would evolve into something unique and dynamic that they didn’t initially intend. And, if they were lucky, their structure would outshine and outlast that of their brother’s.

Recruiting is much like my children playing with Legos. Sometimes you have to look beyond your initial idea, thought or plan to uncover someone whose fit is well-beyond what you ever could have imagined. Keeping an open mind will often lead you to that “diamond in the rough” scenario.

So remember:

  • Don’t give up too quickly
  • Be willing to think out of the box
  • Walk away when needed and return with a fresh set of eyes and a different perspective

If you’re interested in more recruiting tips or would like more information on CAI’s Peer Learning Groups, please contact Jennifer at or 919-431-6093.

Is Turnover Draining your Company?

Tuesday, July 21st, 2015

In today’s video blog, CAI’s Vice President of Membership, Doug Blizzard, discusses turnover and offers ways to help you improve it at your company. Doug begins by sharing that CAI has heard from member organizations that turnover has been rising substantially, doubling and tripling at some companies.

Doug believes that the major issue concerning turnover is that some companies are not addressing it appropriately as a company priority, and he shares his detailed opinion on why during the video. Below is a quick review:

  • Underestimating the true cost of turnover and therefore not allocating appropriate resources
  • Partnering HR with the CFO prior to any executive discussions on fixing turnover is critical
  • Spending time in areas in the company where turnover isn’t a problem to see what you can learn and apply in other areas

CAI has recently added two more HR experts on our Advice and Resolution team who specialize in helping companies think through operational and strategic HR issues like turnover, mergers & acquisitions, talent management, and more. Please reach out to Tom Sheehan or Rick Washburn at 919-878-9222 if you need help thinking through those types of issues.

How to Bounce Back After Vacation in 4 Steps

Thursday, July 16th, 2015

returning to work_vacationThe summer solstice has officially come and gone, and with the onset of soaring temperatures and gas prices comes a welcome reprieve for much of the nation’s workforce —vacation. For many employees, the draw of warm weather and carefree nature of the summer months makes it an ideal time to step away from their office computers and “unplug” for a little while.

With many employees getting ready to head to the leisure spots of their choosing, it can be easy to get caught up in the excitement of stealing away from the office for a vacation. While there’s nothing wrong with taking some “me” time, it’s important to come back to work refreshed and ready to get back into the swing of things.

While a return to work following a week of blissful relaxation can be jarring, following these four tips may help make the transition from vacation back into work much easier to master.

  1. Plan ahead

Before whisking off to some tropical island, make sure you have your ducks in order at work. Communicate to your coworkers that you’ll be away so they won’t be caught off guard when you’re unavailable. In addition, try to see larger and more  difficult projects to completion before the vacation. This will not only give you a sense of accomplishment before you leave, but will also allow you a smoother reentry into the office upon your return. With the larger tasks behind you, you’re then able to take on the smaller tasks  — missed phone calls or emails that accumulated in your absence —and ease back into your normal work pace.

  1. Keep your out of office message on the first day back

You know that charming message you left on your voicemail letting inquiring minds know that for the next week you would be relaxing on a beach in the Bahamas? Leave it on your first day back. By leaving it on, you’re allowing yourself time to sift through those missed emails and sort out what projects to tackle next. Your coworkers will see you back in the office and know you’re available to help, but letting clients know may drag you into new projects and expectations too quickly. You’ll be doing yourself a favor by giving yourself undivided time to catch up on the work you missed.

  1. Get plenty of sleep

Our sleep schedules tend to get all out of whack when we go on vacation. While an erratic sleep schedule works just fine on vacation, it just won’t cut it once when we find ourselves waking up to a piercing early morning. For your first few nights back, try to get to sleep at least an hour earlier than usual to ensure you are well-rested when the alarm clock goes off.

  1. Share memories of your vacation with others

It’s only natural to want to share memories of your blissful time away. It’s likely among the precious few times of the year when you’re able to relax completely. Sharing memories of your travels will remind you of your time away and can elevate your mood, putting you in a positive mindset to take on the tasks of the day. In addition, engaging with your coworkers through your stories can build a better sense of community and translate into a more dynamic and collaborative work environment.

For additional information on ensuring your team stays productive this summer, please call a member of our Advice & Resolution team at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746.

Photo Source: Ra’anan Niss.