Author Archive

Cyber Threats & Security – Stay Safe & Stay Compliant

Tuesday, August 23rd, 2016

The post below is a guest blog from Jordan Whichard who serves as Principal, Health & Welfare Consultant for CAI’s employee benefits partner Hill, Chesson & Woody.

Credit cards with computer chips in them.  New online passwords every 30 days with capital letters and numbers and symbols.  Everywhere we turn these days, companies seem to be going to great new lengths to protect their employees’ and customers’ personal digital information against cyber threats.

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There’s good reason for that.  Organizations ranging from Home Depot to the Federal Government have suffered serious data breaches over the course of the past several years. The healthcare industry appears to be particularly susceptible to breaches, with over 112 million individual records having been compromised in 2015.  With so many different companies suffering from breaches and increased scrutiny around hacks, now is a good time for employers to ensure that they’re doing everything they need to in order to remain compliant, and protect their employees from cyber threats.

If you’re an employer sponsor of a group health plan, chances are you’re already subject to privacy and security rules under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA).  When thinking about cyber threats that impact you directly, the focus should be on the electronic protected health information of your employees. The first step in protecting employee information is making sure that your plan is compliant with HIPAA’s security rules. That includes implementing safeguards on multiple levels, including administrative, physical, technical, and organizational safeguards.  These can run the gamut from tasks as simple as updating the access control to your facility (physical), or as intricate as ensuring that any data stored online is protected by appropriate firewalls and encryption (technical). Ultimately, the best thing you can do to ensure the safety of both your organization and your employees’ information is to be sure you’re HIPAA compliant.  If you aren’t certain of your compliance right now, consider consulting legal counsel or a third party HIPAA consultant.

What are some other steps that groups are taking to make sure their data doesn’t get into the wrong hands? One is educating all employees, regardless of their role, about cybersecurity and IT issues and risks management. Make sure that your company has a uniformly enforced policy for mobile device usage – especially for personally owned devices – in order to help protect sensitive information.  Finally, don’t wait until you experience a breach to learn how to respond. Make sure your affected teams are well versed in their response procedures in the event of an incident.

CAI’s HR Certification Study Course Boasts a 90% Pass Rate for PHR®/SPHR® Exam

Thursday, August 18th, 2016

SignUpAn HR certification will distinguish you from your peers, build your self-confidence, and earn you greater respect from your organization. According to a Payscale Survey, this certification typically translates into the ability to advance more quickly and earn significantly more money.

Did you know North Carolina HR partner, CAI, offers a PHR®/SPHR® Certification Study Course Program that far exceeds the pass rate of the national average of 50%? Program participants who study with us achieve an impressive 90% pass rate PHR®/SPHR® exam!

CAI’s 11-session PHR®/SPHR® Certification Study Course will have you prepared to the best of your ability to pass the exam. You’ll receive a complete study manual, online videos, practice test questions, chat and discussion boards, and testing games. Audio CD’s are included too, so you can listen on your commute.

“I couldn’t imagine taking the exam without the help of your prep class. The materials and experiences, combined with genuine teacher interest and support, really helped me focus my energies and determination,” states Terry L. Taylor, SPHR, HR Manager for Penske Racing Team.

This course is offered days, evenings, and weekends as both in-class sessions here in North Carolina or via live webinar. That means no matter where you reside, or how busy your schedule, you can study with the best and be on your way to the coveted HR certification!

David Siler, SPHR, GPHR, HRBP, HRMP, Managing Partner of Distinctive HR, Inc. has taught the PHR®/SPHR® study course for over 20 years. His engaging, motivational method of teaching will set you up for success!

Still not sure how it will help you? Sign up for the FREE 60-minute LIVE webinar to find out the benefits of achieving your HR certification, eligibility requirements to sit for the exam, and why this study course is the best one to register for.

Take the next step and register today.

For information on course dates/times or to register go to www.capital.org/siler or contact Ashley Modica at 919.431.6080.

CAI is a trusted resource for HR, compliance and people development. With locations in Raleigh and Greensboro, CAI is a membership-driven organization that helps North Carolina employers maximize employee engagement and minimize employer liability through human resources and management advice, training, survey data, public policy advocacy and consulting services. For more information, visit www.capital.org.

Handling Third Party Harassment

Thursday, August 11th, 2016

Employers have the responsibility to protect their employees from workplace discrimination and harassment, whether by other employees or third parties.  Handbooks typically include EEO policies, and anti-discrimination/harassment policies, as well as reporting procedures and a commitment to investigate and resolve any issues.  Clearly these provisions cover co-worker situations, whether a peer or management employee, and the company has more control over that process.  But what do you do when the alleged discrimination or harassment complaint involves a customer, vendor, contractor or other third party?  All of these situations are tricky, but perhaps the most difficult is when the alleged harasser is a customer.  If you’re a B2C company selling to the public, the “customer / alleged harasser” is typically one individual and you won’t have to work with another company to resolve it.  If you’re selling B2B the alleged harasser is an employee of your customer so the lines of responsibility can get blurred.  Both situations present unique challenges.  Let’s focus on a B2B scenario today since that situation can be more tricky. thQE06GKOF

First and foremost, regardless of who is doing the harassing, you want it to stop.  You’re obligated to provide a harassment free workplace.   If that’s not clear at your workplace, it needs to be. However, determining if harassment occurred and if so making it stop will be handled differently when a customer is involved.

Do You Notify the Customer?  Short answer – Yes. With customers it’s a more difficult conversation, but of course, no customer, client, vendor, etc. is more important than the legal rights of your employees. While conversations with clients about these issues are surely uncomfortable, people interacting with your employees need to realize that it is not appropriate to engage in this way with staff of the company and it must stop. If the behavior doesn’t stop, the employer needs to take such action as removing the client/customer from the workplace in the future.  Now that’s an answer you would expect me to give right?  But many of you are thinking – “If only it were that easy?” What if an important customer is involved?  Will you get blamed for jeopardizing the account over potentially a frivolous charge?  What will your Sales Director say – should you tell him?  Will your Leadership team / board / your boss stand behind you? What if the customer’s employee claims your employee was actually doing the harassing?  Questions like these usually make it hard for you to just swiftly and unilaterally take action in harassment cases involving a customer.

So now what?  Let me start here – if you are a member and find yourself in this situation, give anyone on our Advice & Resolution team a call. These cases are tricky and can go in many different directions based on your situation.  Here are the steps I would generally recommend you take:

  1. Conduct what I call a “pre-investigation.” You want to quickly get an idea of what you’re dealing with here. Take no more than a day, two at most.  Get the employee’s statement regarding the inappropriate conduct, date, times, and witnesses and ideally in writing.  Talk to available witnesses.  As with any harassment case, it’s critical that you understand the nature and context of what has occurred. Is this an affair gone bad?  Or does it involve a series of inappropriate comments? Were both parties engaging in the inappropriate behavior until one day a line was crossed?  Is the harassment on-going or has it stopped?
  2. At this point, you should have a reasonable idea as to what was going on, and who is at fault, at least from your side’s vantage point. That will shape how you approach the customer.  I wouldn’t pick up the phone and call the customer just yet.  You need another leader involved.  Ideally your boss.  You don’t need to divulge names, but you want to make sure they are aware you received a compliant, you investigated it, your general findings, and your planned approach with the customer.  I’m not suggesting you get permission, however, they might not agree with your course of action and good to have that discussion now.  They may also have relevant suggestions for you.
  3. After you have received all relevant information about the complaint and made sure that information is included in written form, the allegations should be promptly referred to an appropriate customer representative.   Since the alleged harasser is a customer’s employee, the customer is obligated to investigate.  The person you choose to contact should be considered carefully and should be in a position to both understand the implications of what has occurred and have the authority to take appropriate action. Appropriate contacts could include human resources, an officer or a manager. When in doubt, in most cases, the HR Manager should be contacted.  The person to whom you report the complaint should never be implicated in any way in the harassment that’s been alleged. When you report the complaint, you should ask that the customer investigate, take whatever corrective action is necessary and keep you informed. You want prompt corrective action to be taken if warranted. If it appears that the customer is dragging their feet, you should discuss that issue with the customer.
  4. Sometimes these cases go smoothly – the complaint is clear, it’s definitely harassment, the harasser is clearly guilty, and the customer takes swift action to stop the behavior. Other times, two very different accounts of what has happened exist and two very different courses of actions are proffered.   If you find yourself in the latter case, you’ll be glad you involved your boss / leader in the case.  The customer may believe your employee is equally at fault and advises you to take action against them.  Any move initiated by the company should not appear retaliatory.  Or they may refuse to take any action.  You may have to get attorneys involved.  Make sure on your side that if appropriate based on your investigation to remove contact between the employee and the harasser.  You may ultimately have to make a decision as to the future of your relationship with the customer.

One old axiom of business is that the customer is always right.  As we see here that may not always be true.  When a customer engages in harassing behavior, you need to act, but the path isn’t always clear.   CAI will help illuminate your path to the right resolution for your business.

CAI Celebrates Big Move with Open House Bash

Tuesday, August 9th, 2016

CAI_Open_House_CollageCAI, Human Resources partner to 1,100+ North Carolina member companies, celebrated its new Raleigh location at 3150 Spring Forest Road, #116,
with a ribbon cutting and open house event. “After 32 years, we needed more parking for class participants, an open floor plan suitable for team collaboration and space for our state-of-the-art training facility,” stated Bruce Clarke, CAI’s CEO.

More than 220 CAI members, local business leaders, and special guests were in attendance for the big event which was held on August 8.  Guests mingled and enjoyed hors d’oeuvres, wine, and live jazz while touring the spacious, modern facility. Popular guest speaker and author of The Freak Factor, Dave Rendall, delivered a motivating message on “Initiating Change and Inventing the Future.”

Storr Office Environments, Vision Contractors, and Little Design were acknowledged for turning CAI’s vision into reality.  Included as an integral part of the office transformation team were CAI member companies: Precision Walls, Strategic Connections, Stephenson Millwork and Atcom Business Technology Solutions.

Clarke and CAI board member, Randy Neuhaus, CEO of S&ME presided over the ribbon cutting ceremony and champagne toast.  After a warm round of applause, members congratulated CAI on their long-awaited new facility. “I love the new space,” said CAI member Sean Walsh of Red Hat, “it’s really great to see a company make this kind of investment in their members as well as their employees.”

CAI is a trusted resource for HR, compliance and people development. With locations in Raleigh and Greensboro, CAI is a membership-driven organization that helps North Carolina employers maximize employee engagement and minimize employer liability through human resources and management advice, training, survey data, public policy advocacy and consulting services. For more information, visit www.capital.org.

Drug Testing Can Greatly Reduce Workers’ Compensation Costs

Tuesday, August 9th, 2016

According to CAI’s most recent Policies and Benefits survey, 30% of employers are not conducting drug tests.  Besides the obvious benefits of having a drug-free workplace, another side benefit from drug testing is that it may reduce your workers compensation costs.  On the one hand, employees who are under the influence are more likely to experience injuries to themselves or others.  So the knowledge that you conduct post-accident drug and alcohol testing will dissuade most employees and therefore reduce accidents and costs.drugfreezone

Also, under the North Carolina Workers’ Compensation Act, no compensation will be paid for a workplace injury or death if it was proximately caused by, among other things, the employee’s intoxication, provided the intoxicant was not supplied by the employer (company social event) or being under the influence of a controlled substance listed in the North Carolina Controlled Substances Act (G.S. 90-86) unless it was prescribed by a doctor and the prescribed dosages were being followed.  Note, there isn’t an automatic denial of claims due to intoxication but odds are in the employer’s favor unless it can be proven the accident was in no way related to the “altered state” so to speak.

The best way to increase the odds that such claims will be denied is to incorporate a comprehensive drug and alcohol testing policy. Without such a policy, denial of workers compensation claims due to being under the influence may be harder to achieve.

North Carolina employers who drug test are required to comply with the NC Controlled Substances Examination Regulation Act which regulates notice requirements to examinees, requires approved laboratories and chain of custody safeguards, specifies conditions for applicant and employee testing, requires confirmation tests on positive samples, and entitles an employee who tests positive to have a retest, if requested, of the same sample at the employee’s expense.

Many states have a provision in their Workers’ Compensation law disqualifying an employee for compensation if the injury was caused by being under the influence of drugs or alcohol.  A number of states also give discounts on Workers’ Compensation premiums (generally 5-7%) for implementing a Drug-Free Workplace Program.  CCH, the Members-only resource, provides State Law Summaries on Workers’ Compensation laws.

The US Department of Labor has resources for developing a drug-free workplace program.  While this is a requirement for federal contractors, the resources are helpful to all employers.  Consult the state law for specific requirements in other states.  Our drug-testing partner, PDSS, is also a resource for policy development, testing, and in-depth expertise in this area.

CAI encourages drug-free workplaces. Learn how drug testing programs can increase the efficiency and productivity of your organization at CAI.

Have you registered for CAI’s 2016 Compensation & Benefits Conference?

Tuesday, August 2nd, 2016

Get ready for the 2016 Compensation & Benefits Conference! Top speakers will share their valuable industry insight to make your organization stand out from the crowd. You’ll learn cutting-edge techniques to reward, engage and retain top talent in a challenging economy.C&B Save the Date Blog

Join us for the 2016 Compensation & Benefits Conference on September 15th and September 16th at the McKimmon Center in Raleigh to receive practical solutions to some of your biggest HR challenges. With 11+ speakers and 2 panel sessions, this conference will equip you with the facts, insights and tools needed to translate current data and trends into a realistic action plan.

Four keynote presentations:

2016 Labor Market Trends: Considerations for Pay and Performance

Kerry Chou – WorldatWork

Attracting, Retaining and Engaging Top Talent

Michael Patrick – Willis Towers Watson’s Atlanta Talent & Rewards Practice

Leverage Marketplace Trends for Total Reward Strategy Decisions

Molly G. Hegeman – CAI

New FLSA Regulations: What Employers are doing to Adopt the Changes

CAI’s George Ports, Emily Hinesley and Cynthia Daniel

Choose from 9 interactive breakout sessions led by local Compensation & Benefits experts. Some of the topics include:

ACA: We Came, We Saw, We Conquered – Shifting Focus to Cost Control

Skip Woody – Hill, Chesson & Woody

Creating a Salary Structure: 101

Jennifer Solomonson – The Employers Association

Creating a Salary Structure: Advanced Application

Jennifer Solomonson – The Employers Association

Hot Topics in Wage and Hour Law

Amie Flowers Carmack – Morningstar Law Group

How to Get Employees on Track for Retirement

Jake Connors – Compass Financial Partners

An Internal Perspective on Market Analysis

CAI Member Panel

Join the 250 North Carolina business and HR professionals responsible for compensation and benefits plans and strategies at this amazing Conference!

Register today!

Marketplace Premiums Will Continue To Trend Upward In 2017

Tuesday, July 19th, 2016

marketplaceblogThe post below is a guest blog from Jay Lowe who serves as Principal, Health & Welfare Consultant for CAI’s employee benefits partner Hill, Chesson & Woody.

Now is the time when insurance carriers will begin determining premium pricing for their individual plans and filing for approval with state departments of insurance.  Undoubtedly, their goal will be to offer plans that meet the needs of most, maintain competitive pricing, and avoid losses associated with not being able to underwrite or deny coverage during the Annual Enrollment Period (AEP) or Special Enrollment Periods (SEP).  The Kaiser Family Foundation discusses some of the challenges that insurers will continue to face when determining rates for the upcoming calendar year.  One challenge that is of interest continues to be those individuals that remain uninsured.  The Kaiser article indicates that these uninsured individuals are generally healthier and their enrollment would help to offset costs as they are expected to have a fewer health care claims.  The Individual Mandate provision of the ACA requires everyone to have coverage, or else face a penalty.  In 2016, that penalty is $695 or 2.5% of household income, whichever is greater.  In 2017, these penalties will be adjusted upward for inflation.  As these penalties continue to rise it will be interesting to see how many people continue to remain uninsured and if their eventual compliance with the Individual Mandate actually has a positive impact on rates.

In North Carolina, the pricing challenge becomes more difficult in 2017 as one major carrier, United Healthcare, is pulling their individual plans from the Marketplace (where individuals can receive a federal subsidy for insurance premiums) as they have decided to no longer participate in this state. This will leave our state with only 1 major carrier offering subsidy-eligible plans, Blue Cross Blue Shield of North Carolina.   This may put additional pricing pressure on BCBSNC and drive their premiums even higher.  They have already been forced to make dramatic network changes in an effort to keep pricing at acceptable levels with both their members as well as the NC Department of Insurance.  Time will tell if these changes create more stability in premium pricing.

As 2017 approaches, those with individual insurance plans will be anxious to see what their premium increases will be for the next year.  Double-digit increases in the 20-30% range would not be a surprise as insurance carriers may still be trying to offset losses from prior years.  State Departments of Insurance will be responsible for approving any increase requests and plan design changes, as the carriers will most likely adjust benefit levels to maximum premium savings.  Regarding the Marketplace departure of United Healthcare in 2017, small group employers need to understand that UHC will continue to offer group-based plans.  With moving away from the Marketplace, UHC is looking 2-3 years to the future to ensure that they will continue to be competitive with individual plans outside of the Marketplace, as well as with their small group plans.  In North Carolina, will BCBSNC follow suit?  Time will tell.

Pharmacies, Big Pharma, and Rising Prescription Prices

Tuesday, June 28th, 2016

The post below is a guest blog from Steve Byrd who serves as Principal, Health & Welfare Consultant for CAI’s employee benefits partner Hill, Chesson & Woody.

Rising health costsA key trend among medical plans lately has been the move away from traditional pharmacy tiers. In the traditional model, generics — regardless of cost — reside under the least expensive copay tiers on your medical plan. In contrast, brand- name medications reside under the higher, more expensive copay tiers.  For many years this model was the norm, and most consumers became very familiar with it.  However, continued pressure to reduce cost has forced insurers to re-evaluate this traditional view.  It is expected by some, that by the year 2024, pharmacy costs will equal half of our overall medical costs.

Many brand name medications are coming off of their patents, creating opportunity for generics to evolve.  Traditionally, these generics have offered great savings over their brand name counterparts. However, many of generics are now entering the market at prices much higher than historical levels, creating new pressure on insurers to hold down costs.

In response to these increasing costs, insurers are re-evaluating their pharmacy tiering.  Generic medications are being treated no differently than brand name medications; These drugs are being tiered based on their overall cost regardless of their designation as a brand or generic medication.  Pharmacy pricing changes are catching many people off-guard.  They don’t understand why their generic medication, which used to be offered in a more affordable tier on, might now be Tier 3 or Tier 4 on their carrier’s formulary.  Consumers are having to work even harder to understand their carrier’s pharmacy benefits. They are having more direct conversations with their providers and pharmacists to try to minimize their out-of-pocket costs, which are increasing with no end in sight.

If insurance carriers are going to be able to offer competitive priced medical plans, gaining better control over rising pharmacy costs is critical.  Pharmacy expenses account for a significant portion the average person’s overall medical expenses, and both consumers and carriers are feeling the pain.  One insurance carrier is even suing its Pharmacy Benefit Manager for $3 billion over questioned pharmacy charges.

Fortunately for consumers, there are many new Rx tools popping up that can help members navigate their benefits. Goodrx.com and healthiestyou.com are good examples. A recent Consumer Reports article provides additional guidance on ways consumers can save on pharmacy costs. Consumers also need to evaluate options at their local pharmacies, as they can often find some of the higher priced generics offered at lower costs through a local pharmacy’s prescription plan.

As healthcare spending continues to increase, and pharmacy costs continue to become a larger portion of the cost, more pressure will be applied towards controlling pharmaceutical costs. Consumers will continue to see changes to their pharmacy benefits and their carriers designated carrier’s prescription formulary.

 

Recruiting is not rocket science, or is it?

Tuesday, June 21st, 2016

recruiting_the_bestPerhaps you’ve heard the name Elon Musk. He’s got quite a résumé. Musk is the CEO of SpaceX, an American aerospace manufacturer and space transport services company. His company builds rockets that send people and cargo into space.  Musk is realizing his vision at SpaceX by building simple and relatively inexpensive reusable rockets that go into space multiple times. He hopes to achieve turnaround time capabilities that are similar to commercial airliners.

Oh, by the way, Musk is also the CEO and product architect of Tesla Motors and cofounder of PayPal.

I tell you this because of how Elon Musk views the importance of hiring great talent. Musk’s recruiting strategy at SpaceX is to demand the best person on the planet — whether they were there to build a rocket or serve ice cream on campus.

Dolly Singh, SpaceX’s former Director of Talent quoted Musk as saying, “Find me the single best person on the freaking planet, then convince me why out of how many billion people on the planet that this is that guy.”  Singh continued, “And he does that even if it’s the cook. When we built a yogurt booth inside of SpaceX, he said, ‘Go to Pinkberry and find me the employee of the month, and I want to hire the employee of the month.’”

The point is, Musk as one of the most innovative and successful business leaders in the world, is still laser-focused on hiring great talent. He understands that bringing in mediocre talent will likely prevent him from realizing his dreams.

The late Steve Jobs, cofounder, CEO and Chairman of Apple Inc. believed in hiring A players.  According to Jobs, “A small team of A+ players can run circles around a giant team of B and C players.”  A-players are motivated, engaged and creative. They are performance-driven and have high expectations for themselves and for others. B and C-players, on the other hand, often do just enough to get by and to be paid for it.

We can learn a valuable lesson from Musk, and Jobs…Settling for ‘so-so’ talent will likely get you ‘so-so’ results. So the next time you are looking to hire someone, think like a rocket scientist and hire only the best.

CAI helps more than 1,000 North Carolina employers with their HR needs including talent acquisition process or strategies.  Contact CAI today!

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Tom Sheehan brings 20+ years of extensive, broad based strategic, tactical and practical HR experience to CAI’s Advice & Resolution team.  He advises HR and other business leaders on talent management, organizational effectiveness, employee engagement, M&A’s, and employee relations.

Why Top Performers Choose to Leave

Tuesday, June 14th, 2016

why_employees_quitDuring a declining economy, new hires for organizations would often come from an increasing pool of unemployed workers. Now, with an improved economy and the job market on the rebound, the paradigm is shifting and new hires are being recruited from other organizations.

If you are on the recruiting end, this is excellent news. Your candidate pool that may have consisted of mostly unemployed workers just increased to include workers who may already be working in the very role you are seeking to fill – just for someone else currently. However, you could find yourself on the losing end of that equation if it is your employee who is being recruited.

As the economy and job market continue to gain strength, top employees who were once too concerned about security and doubt to leave their job are now reconsidering their position and their level of overall job satisfaction. Restored confidence in the economy is fueling confidence in their ability to improve on their current position. Also, your competitors are using the same tools you are to identify and actively pursue ordinarily passive candidates and recruit them to a better opportunity. Recruiters are getting calls from employed workers, at good companies, making good money, doing good work – and ready for a change.

Who are these employees, and why would they entertain leaving for another position at another company? What can be done to counteract this problem? According to a Forbes survey, the top five reasons seemingly satisfied employees leave a company are:

Trust

The number one reason employees leave their current employer is a lack of trust. This could stem from earlier cutbacks in pay and/or benefits, layoffs or other measures made necessary by a declining economy. If an employee is unhappy with the way in which a particular remedy was handled, or if they feel they are being kept in the dark, they begin to wonder if they will be next. Reach out to employees and establish a solid two-way path for communication. Be sure they are informed of company initiatives and the reasons behind them. Ask for their opinions, input and feedback. Make them feel a part of the organization and its success.

Recognition

Employees often leave if they feel unappreciated or experience a lack of recognition for their accomplishments in their current role. In an economy that has dictated doing more with less, many top performers have been asked to go above and beyond their job description. They expect and deserve recognition for pitching in and doing what is necessary during these last few difficult years. Make certain your employees are recognized for their contributions to the company’s success. Other employees will see this public recognition and become inspired to heighten their performance as well. Be sure the recognition is meaningful and for something measurable. Savvy employees will see through false recognition and be suspect of it.

Politics

Some employees tire of the internal politics within their company and begin to seek another company to work for. All organizations with an org chart are going to inherently have a certain amount of internal politics, so it stands to reason any new company they join will also have similar issues. The driving force behind their dissatisfaction is not so much the politics, but the fact it interferes with their being able to do their job to the best of their ability. Top performers are top performers because they choose to be. Anything that interferes with satisfying their internal drive becomes an issue. Internal politics will tend to ripple through your workforce and cause performance to drag. Isolate your workforce from this to the greatest extent possible. Make sure corporate decisions are communicated well and are backed by valid, understandable logic. Political maneuvering will undermine an organization’s ability to move forward as a single unit.

Manager

Sometimes people just do not get along. It could be a mismatch in personality or a difference in management style. Employees will get frustrated with their manager and may start to seek opportunities elsewhere. The difference between this reason and the other reasons in this list is there are often warning signs associated with this one. Frustration of this type tends to build over time. Casual, confidential conversations with employees and managers on a routine basis will usually uncover these issues before they become a reason for voluntary turnover. Act early and work with parties on both sides of the issue to develop an acceptable solution for everyone involved.

Inflexibility

More and more organizations are embracing flexibility within the workforce. Telecommuting and flexible work schedules are popping up as recruiting incentives everywhere you turn. Employees, like everyone else, want what they do not currently have that others have. If your employees are asking for this from your company and other employers in your area of similar size and industry offer it, be prepared to lose some of your top talent. Take special note of what your competition for talent is implementing and adopt similar incentives if they can work within your business model.

Although these are the top five reasons employees voluntarily leave their current position, there is one primary reason that is not listed here. One of the biggest reasons employees leave is because business leaders often fail to understand why employees leave. Employers go to great lengths and follow detailed processes and procedures when recruiting and onboarding new employees. During their tenure with the company, employers reach out to employees at least annually or semi-annually to evaluate their performance, praise accomplishments and recommend improvements.

Several forward-thinking companies have begun the practice of conducting periodic “stay interviews.” It only makes good sense to interview your best performers while they are working for you, rather than only gain their honest feedback when they are on their way out the door.

So, why not schedule casual interviews with the best performers and those who have the highest potential within your organization? Find out what is on their mind, as well as any issues or concerns they have. Ask about ideas they have regarding the corporate culture or even improvements in processes, policies or production. Most importantly, apply what is learned during this conversation where applicable and avoid voluntary turnover.

If you have questions about how CAI can help you with Talent Acquisition and Talent Management,  please contact a member of CAI’s Advice & Resolution Team.

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CAI Advice & Resolution team member Renee Watkins is a seasoned HR professional with a diverse background in Human Resource. Renee provides CAI members with practical advice in a wide-range of human resource functions including conflict resolution, compliance and regulatory issues, and employee relations.