Archive for October, 2015

3 Tips To Diversifying Your Recruiting Efforts

Thursday, October 29th, 2015

recruitingIn today’s post, CAI’s HR on Demand Consultant Cynthia Daniel shares 3 strategies to help your business freshen up its recruiting process and secure a wider range of talented candidates.

As a recruiter, my goal is to locate the best qualified candidate for each position. Failure to do so may result in our clients having employee nightmares for weeks, months or even years! While it would be very easy to rely on the same old methods of recruiting for each organization, using a variety of sources and tactics has proved invaluable to me as well as our clients!

3 ways to recruit the best candidates:

  • Pay attention to the role that you are recruiting for. When recruiting for a new position it always helps to assess the situation. We know that if we are looking for our next Vice President, we probably won’t be able to look in the same place as we would for our Forklift Driver. Knowing where to look is key to finding that right person quickly!
  • Don’t forget about your current employees. Your internal employees may be looking for developmental opportunities within your company, so don’t count them out just yet.  Know your workforce and who may be qualified for some of your open positions and get your managers involved if you need to as well.  Recruiting internally can cut costs, boost employee morale and productivity!
  • External recruiting, however, is still a great choice when you lack qualified internal employees.  There are many sources you can pull from including local universities, unemployment offices, veteran’s offices, professional membership organizations, LinkedIn, college alumni offices, search firms, internet job banks, outplacement agencies, and many more. Yes, some of these outlets can be pricey, so know your budget and what you can afford.  But in turn, some are free or have minimal costs associated with them.

If you’re using the same old tactic over and over again and it’s not producing the candidates you want… maybe it’s time to try something new. You must think differently and act differently to get different results. What are you doing to think differently and act differently about recruiting and hiring? If you aren’t thinking and acting differently, I can guarantee you that someone else is.

CAI’s recruiting team is dedicated to helping you with all of your recruiting needs. Whether it’s learning more about strategies for recruiting great talent, having us recruit for and fill your vacant positions, or simply answering a few questions, we’re here to help! Please feel free to contact our recruiting team directly at 996-899-1140 or cynthia.daniel@capital.org

 

 

 

Study Finds Workplace Rudeness is Highly Contagious

Tuesday, October 27th, 2015

Sick woman at work drinking coffee

In today’s post, CAI’s Vice President of Membership Doug Blizzard shares the uncomfortable truth regarding the spread of negativity in the office. 

Peak flu season is still a few months away, but there’s another type of bug flying around the office that is just as contagious—and perhaps more harmful  – workplace rudeness.

Remember the old adage that if you give a smile chances are you’ll get one back?  Well, according to a new study published in the Journal of Applied Psychology, rudeness is just as contagious – and in it can be more harmful because it won’t just run its course and go away on its own. The damage it does is longer lasting, even permanent if you do not do something about it.

Researchers from the University of Florida did a study of behaviors among graduate business students about behaviors that came out as they practiced their negotiating skills with classmates.  Each student practiced with several other students over a period of weeks and then the students rated each others’ behaviors. A key finding was that those who judged their partners as rude were more likely to be judged as rude themselves. In other words, rudeness was contagious.

The study showed that rudeness activates a network of closely-related concepts in individuals’ minds. This activation influences individual’s hostile behaviors.  Another interesting finding of the study is that you don’t need to be the victim of a rude act to catch the bug. Employees who simply witness a rude act are likely to be rude to other employees.

“What we found in this study is that the contagious effect is based on an automatic cognitive mechanism — automatic means it happens somewhere in the subconscious part of your brain, so you don’t know its happening and can’t do much to stop it,” explained the study’s lead author, Trevor Foulk.  “Anything from simple insults to ignoring a co-worker, to purposely dis-including someone or withholding information,” can create the toxic environment, he added.  “It doesn’t just hurt your feelings,” says Mr. Foulk. “Experiencing or witnessing rudeness hurts your performance.”

A whopping 98% of workers say they have experienced workplace rudeness, with 50% percent of people experiencing these behaviors at least weekly, according to the study.  Any and all kinds of rudeness, from simple insults, to ignoring a co-worker, to purposely dis-including or withholding information from someone, can create the toxic environment.

Not only does rudeness negatively affect the workplace; it has also been linked to more stress at home.

Organizations’ cultures, like those of entire societies and nationalities, are the sum total of learned behaviors and the social and business values they reflect. People in the organization observe these behaviors in its key leaders and each other. Intuitively they associate the behaviors with success, they adopt them themselves and they pass them on to new members. It is an intuitive process that nurtures and sustains itself unless and until the key leaders change the key behaviors to new ones that reflect different values.  Rudeness is a behavior. As such it can be changed, and the toxic culture it creates will change along with it. But the leaders are the ones who have to start the process and sustain it.

Keep smiling and be respectful to one another. That is not just a happy-face platitude; it is a real-world strategy that helps build a winning culture and improve performance in organizations.  For more information about how you can build a more positive environment at your workplace, please call our Advice and Resolution team today at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746.

The Six Most Common Talent Management Mistakes

Thursday, October 22nd, 2015

Emotional Intelligence

In today’s post, our HR Business Partner Tom Sheehan shares the top mistakes your business needs to avoid when managing talent.

Talent management encompasses a broad spectrum of talent initiatives including workforce planning, recruiting, onboarding, performance management, development, succession planning, total rewards, and others. The goal of talent management is to create a high-performance, sustainable organization that meets its strategic and operational goals and objectives.

HR leaders play an active role in aligning the organization’s talent with its business objectives. Over the years I’ve seen six common talent management mistakes that reduce organizational performance.

1. Paying Below Market Value for Talent

When the demand for talent is high and the supply is low it can be very difficult to attract ‘A’ players. Often the candidate pool will be filled with those who are unhappy or already out of a job. When you pay below market value for talent, you tend to attract the wrong people, the ‘C’ or worse players. This will force you to make hiring decisions based on some of the most mediocre talent in the marketplace.

2. Maintaining a Long, Arduous Hiring Process

The purpose of a hiring and interviewing process is to identify the top potential prospects for a position. It should not be an endurance contest for the candidates. When the total hiring process lasts 2 months from start to finish, the organization will struggle to hire good talent. A good hiring process should last no longer than 3 – 4 weeks, any longer and good candidates will leave the process. Good talent will decide to stay where they are, they will find other opportunities to pursue and they will take other jobs. Make it a priority to keep your hiring process down to 3 – 4 weeks or less to insure you don’t lose the best talent.

3. Hiring Based on Interviewing Skills

Unfortunately, the majority of hiring today is based on the interviewing skills of the candidate and the personal chemistry developed during the interview process. The hiring manager often allows the personal chemistry with the candidate to influence and possibly drive the hiring decision. There are many individuals out there who are ‘professional interviewers.’ They can eloquently answer any question, explain why they got downsized and make it look like it was a promotion. Keep in mind, they are so good at interviewing for a reason, they have had lots of practice at it.

4. Lack of Defined Career Paths

When the goal is to hire top talent, it is imperative to map out the potential career path available, even if the path is dependent upon many variables. As long as the possibility exists, the position will hold a much higher chance of attracting the caliber of talent desired. This is not only important for hiring but also for keeping existing top performers from getting dissatisfied and happy with their career growth with your organization.

5. Not Interviewing When Empty Seats are Filled

It is often normal for organizations to stop all recruiting once their current open positions are filled. Not a good idea. With a low unemployment rate, there is a shortage of good talent. If you wait for the next opening to arise, you will slow future hiring to a crawl. Never stop interviewing for those positions which are most mission-critical or those with frequent turnover.

6. Tolerating Low Performers

GE made a practice each year of letting the bottom 5 -10% of the performers go in every division. The idea was to replace them with “A” players, thus continually creating an influx of strong new talent. It might feel good to have an organization where everyone is happy and there is no goal pressure. However, allowing poor performers to miss performance targets year after year has tremendous consequences.  It conditions the company and the employees to accept and tolerate unacceptable performance and drowns the organization in a sea of mediocrity. Poor performance management and lack of employee accountability can degrade your talent level in a hurry.

Should you have any further questions regarding how to manage your talent, please call our Advice and Resolution team today at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746.

Study Shows Possible Negative Effects of Special Enrollment Periods

Tuesday, October 20th, 2015

Blog 015 PictureThe post below is a guest blog from Jay Lowe who serves as Principal, Health & Welfare Consultant for CAI’s employee benefits partner Hill, Chesson & Woody.

Recent data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services show that enrollment in Marketplace plans during Special Enrollment Periods (SEP) continues to increase. Between February 23 and June 30, 2015, CMS reports that close to 950,000 people enrolled in coverage. Under the ACA, a qualifying life event allows someone to enroll in Marketplace coverage at that time. One does not have to wait until the normal open enrollment period that begins November 1 for coverage to be effective January 1. The SEP could be triggered by such things as loss of group coverage, birth of a child, marriage or divorce. While this is a provision of the law that ensures Americans will not have to go without coverage, the SEP could prove to play a big part in the rising rates of the individual market year after year.

The Good and the Bad

The data in the CMS report suggests that during this SEP timeframe those enrolling tended to be younger than average. This can account for things like children aging off of their parents’ plans and parents enrolling their newborns in coverage. This is good as those that are younger tend to be healthier and have more predictable costs year in and year out. Insurers like this as the premium they pay in helps to offset the costs for those that have more health-related issues and tend to use more healthcare. Insuring the young, healthy population is a vital piece in helping to keep Marketplace costs lower and something that the insurance companies count on when determining rates every year. But the SEP provision for the Marketplace can pose a potential problem for these insurance companies.

So that insurers can more accurately determine the risk of their blocks of business and set rates accordingly, the ACA provides for an open enrollment period once per year. Without an SEP, a person is unable to enroll and must wait until the beginning of the next calendar year to have coverage. The problem that the SEP creates is now people can buy coverage outside of the normal annual open enrollment period. While the addition of the younger, healthier members is good, the SEPs also provide an opportunity for unhealthy members to join. The ACA requires insurance companies that participate in the Marketplace to provide coverage to anyone who enrolls. No longer can somebody be denied coverage or be rated up based on a health condition. While many who enroll during an SEP are young and healthy (which the insurance companies like), there are many who are sick and unhealthy. The insuring of this unknown risk poses a big problem for insurers as they are unable to adjust rates during the course of the year based on the medical conditions of those entering the plans. Members who enroll during an SEP get the same rates (based on age and plan design) as those that enrolled in the annual open enrollment period.

Ultimately, insurance companies may be forced to raise rates as claims and loss ratios go up. The SEPs provide a much needed avenue for people to buy insurance coverage. But what will this do to rates? As we enter in to the third year of the Marketplace it will be interesting to see how the insurers continue to respond to constant dilemma.

 

Creating a Better Background Check for Your Business

Thursday, October 15th, 2015
Kevin von der Lippe, Private Investigator

Kevin von der Lippe, Private Investigator

The following post is from CAI’s Kevin von der Lippe. He serves as CAI’s private investigator and leads the company’s Background Checking department.

Most companies do some sort of “background check” on their new hires — But most of the time… you get what you pay for.  How can you be sure that you are getting accurate information you actually need to make a good hiring decision?

The Basics

Performing a background check is your opportunity to independently verify the information that your applicant has provided.  Given the importance of the task, the verification process should extend beyond their stated skill set, and include even the most basic information such as the applicant’s name, address history, and vital statistics.  Be aware, product names for these type of searches may vary, but many companies refer to them as “SSN traces, address histories, or name histories.”

With a verified name and address history in hand, you now have the name/names to search for criminal history as well as the jurisdiction(s) to do so. The availability of criminal records varies among states.  To ensure that you are getting the most up-to-date information, CAI recommends that you request criminal records that are pulled directly from official repositories (e.g. courthouses).  Some states, like North Carolina, have excellent statewide indexes administered by the court system.  However, some other states lack the technology, or access to do so.  As a result, many background checking companies sell database products under names like “Nationwide Criminal, National Criminal or Multi-State Criminal records,” but it’s important to know that most of these databases are from a third-party collection of criminal records, not an actual courthouse. While database searches CAN provide a broad net when searching for records, it’s usually at the expense of missing information and being out of date.  As a result, CAI recommends that you reserve these database inquiries as a supplemental search.

How many jurisdictions you search depends upon the sensitivity of the job you are trying to fill.  Most companies look at a seven year address window — as revealed by the SSN trace — to provide an outline of where to search.  Remember, be consistent with the time period you choose to search. Check the applicant’s employment history.  It is very important that you look for gaps in the employment history and you get satisfactory (and confirmed) answers for any idle time.  CAI recommends that you check all former employers within the window you set, and ask specifically about: dates of employment, job title, salary; duties, if the applicant was involved with any violence, and any specifically job related requirements.  As a side note, always look up the phone number for references.  It is common for applicants to provide bogus numbers to ensure they get “good” references.  You should be cautious of toll free number for former employers.

Focus

With the basics of identity, references and criminal record behind you, focus on job specific requirements.  You should tailor your background check to fit the needs of the position that you want to fill.  For some jobs, you will want to confirm that the applicant has the necessary education to be successful at the job.  You should check the diploma or degree as well as the schools’ accreditation.  It’s not enough that a school claims to be “accredited” these days, there are several “diploma mills” that create bogus accreditation’s for an organization.  Always check the accreditation against the U.S. Department of Educations approved list at: http://www.ed.gov/admins/finaid/accred/index.html.

Will your applicant drive a company vehicle, or does the job require driving as part of the regular job duties (like driving to the post office)?  If so, it is a great idea to confirm that you applicant is fully licensed to drive, and has a good driving record.  A motor vehicle report will provide at a minimum a three year driving record for your applicant.  In most cases, it will also include tickets received while your applicant was out of his/her home state.

If your applicant is going to handle money, or has access to credit, or sensitive information (e.g. account numbers, SSNs, etc.) then it may be a good idea to check your applicant’s financial credit file.  If your applicant cannot demonstrate that they can manage their own personal finances, what expectation should you have that they can manage your company’s money?

Specialized

Beyond the standard checks, there are a lot of specialized searches that you may choose to utilize to ensure that you make the best hiring decision.  This is especially true if you are hiring for employees that will be working on government contracts.  It is not uncommon for the contracts to require searches of federal criminal record, debarment lists, and the terrorist watch list.  Many schools require sex offender list searches as well.

Although performing a background check is usually one of the final stages in the hiring process when we’re ready to hire someone, it’s a crucial that you get it right… the first time.  Generally speaking, most companies and HR professionals perform background checks, but the majority of them are under a false impression that all background checks are the same – not true.

Remember, it’s not just a background checking service that you’re entrusting this company to perform, it’s also the safety and longevity of your entire company. Don’t just “check-the-box” and go with the lowest cost provider, make sure they’re using reliable and up-to-date databases, checking for any discrepancies and providing you with the individualized feedback you need to make the best possible decision for your company. Resist the temptation to rush through this important step. Turnover is costly and hiring the wrong person could be deadly. After all, most people fail at jobs for reasons other than lack of skill…reasons that could easily be uncovered with a properly administered background check.

Our Background Checking Team will help you uncover everything you need to know about your job applicants and employees. If you would like to talk about your company’s specific needs, please call Kevin W. von der Lippe at (336) 899-1150 or by e-mail at kevin.vonderlippe@capital.org.

First Impressions Vital to Candidate Experience and the Bottom Line

Tuesday, October 13th, 2015
Renee' Watkins, HR Advisor

Renee’ Watkins, HR Advisor

In today’s post, Advice and Resolution team member Renee’ Watkins shares the importance of creating a strong candidate experience and its positive impact on the health of your business.

The overall experience a candidate encounters during the interview process is very important to securing the candidate’s continued interest in your organization.   As competition for top talent continues to grow, and candidate expectations of potential employers expand, it is vital to make the best first impression possible.

According to a new CareerBuilder study, candidates who are turned off by a bad interview experience could go so far as to stop purchasing products or services provided by your company and may tell their family and friends to do the same.  According to the study of 5,000 workers and 2,000 hiring managers, candidate expectations are on the rise.

Here are a few specifics from the study:

The Bottom Line – A negative hiring experience can actually affect your bottom line.  Although eighty-two percent (82%) of employers felt there would be no negative impact to their bottom line as a result of a bad hiring experience,  58% of candidates indicated they would be less likely to buy from a company after a bad hiring experience. Sixty-nine percent (69%) of candidates said they would be more likely to buy from a company after a positive interview in which they were treated with respect.

Networking – According to the study, the average candidate researches an organization using as many as eighteen (18) resources during their job search.  Job boards, social networking sites, and online referrals are just a few of those resources.  Fifty-eight percent (58%) of employers fail to track how candidates learn about a position or how they researched the organization.  As a result, these employers miss a real opportunity to connect with candidates who are actively searching for jobs.

The “Black Hole” – The absolute worst thing an employer can do after interviewing an application is failure to follow up.  Candidates would prefer bad news over none at all.  Unfortunately, 52% of employers say they respond to less than half of their applicants, while 84% of today’s candidates expect a personal email response from their application, even if the answer is negative.  Do not let your candidate applications fall into the “Black Hole.”

Communication – Today’s technology makes it all too simple to send out a quick note via email to an applicant who has been through the interview process.  According to the study 41% of job applicants expect to be notified after the interview process if they were not chosen for the job opening. Seventy-three (73%) said they were never notified of anything post-interview.

KISS – We have all heard of the KISS method.  Keeping it simple is still the best way to keep candidates engaged in the hiring process.  A complicated application process can cause a candidate to lose interest and move on to another company they may be interested in.  Forty percent (40%) of applicants complain the hiring process has  become to difficult and 57% complain the process is too automated and lacks a personal touch.

Make Me An Offer – Making a good first impression during the hiring process can produce other benefits as well for the organization.  Seventy-seven percent (77%) of candidates surveyed said they would accept an offer 5% lower than their expectations if the interview process went well and left them with a good impression of the company.  Eighty-three percent (83%) said they would accept 5% less if the company had a great reputation as an employer.

Companies that have a strong reputation for an excellent hiring process and making a great first impression have a definite advantage.  Fifty-two percent (52%) of employers surveyed admit they do not have such a reputation, giving the other 48% the edge in acquiring top talent.

If you have any further questions regarding how you can develop or improve upon your existing talent acquisition process, please call our Advice and Resolution team today at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746.

Drug Testing Can Greatly Reduce Workers’ Compensation Costs

Thursday, October 8th, 2015
Pat Rountree, HR Advisor

Pat Rountree, HR Advisor

CAI’s Advice and Resolution team member Pat Rountree shares valuable information regarding the connection between drug testing and lower compensations costs for your business.

According to CAI’s most recent Policies and Benefits survey, 30% of employers are not conducting drug tests.  Besides the obvious benefits of having a drug-free workplace, another side benefit from drug testing is that it may reduce your workers’ compensation costs.  On the one hand, employees who are under the influence are more likely to experience injuries to themselves or others.  So the knowledge that you conduct post-accident drug and alcohol testing will dissuade most employees and therefore reduce accidents and costs.

Also, under the North Carolina Workers’ Compensation Act, no compensation will be paid for a workplace injury or death if it was proximately caused by, among other things, the employee’s intoxication, provided the intoxicant was not supplied by the employer (company social event) or being under the influence of a controlled substance listed in the North Carolina Controlled Substances Act (G.S. 90-86) unless it was prescribed by a doctor and the prescribed dosages were being followed.  Note, there isn’t an automatic denial of claims due to intoxication but odds are in the employer’s favor unless it can be proven the accident was in no way related to the “altered state” so to speak.

The best way to increase the odds that such claims will be denied is to incorporate a comprehensive drug and alcohol testing policy. Without such a policy, denial of workers’ compensation claims due to being under the influence may be harder to achieve.

North Carolina employers who drug test are required to comply with the NC Controlled Substances Examination Regulation Act which regulates notice requirements to examinees, requires approved laboratories and chain of custody safeguards, specifies conditions for applicant and employee testing, requires confirmation tests on positive samples, and entitles an employee who tests positive to have a retest, if requested, of the same sample at the employee’s expense.

Many states have a provision in their Workers’ Compensation law disqualifying an employee for compensation if the injury was caused by being under the influence of drugs or alcohol.  A number of states also give discounts on Workers’ Compensation premiums (generally 5-7%) for implementing a Drug-Free Workplace Program.  CCH, the Members-only resource, provides State Law Summaries on Workers’ Compensation laws.

CAI encourages drug-free workplaces.  The US Department of Labor has resources for developing a drug-free workplace program.  While this is a requirement for federal contractors, the resources are helpful to all employers.  Consult the state law for specific requirements in other states.  Our drug-testing partner, PDSS, is also a resource for policy development, testing, and in-depth expertise in this area.

For more information on how you can reduce your company’s cost of workers’ compensation through drug testing, please contact our Advice and Resolution team today at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746.

Use Multiple Channels of Communication to Recognize Employees

Tuesday, October 6th, 2015
Renee' Watkins, HR Advisor

Renee’ Watkins, HR Advisor

In today’s post, Advice and Resolution team member Renee’ Watkins shares some new strategies to reach and recognize your employees.

A recent survey conducted by the IBM Smarter Workforce Institute illustrates the importance of using multiple channels for recognizing employees for their accomplishments and contributions.

Over 19,000 workers in 26 countries participated in the survey, which produced the following key observations:

  • 76% of employees who receive recognition are engaged in their jobs, whereas only
  • 28% are engaged in their jobs who do not receive recognition
  • 51% of employees without recognition indicated they intended to leave, whereas only
  • 25% who receive recognition were intending to leave their employer

Obviously, recognition of employees is an excellent productivity and retention strategy.  However, many organizations continue to rely solely on written and verbal recognition methods.  According to the survey, 58% of employers use emails for employee recognition.  This may not be the best way to reach today’s Millennial workforce.

The workforce of today includes many members of Generation-Y, who have grown up with the notion of instantaneous information access in almost every aspect of life- including work.  Their expectation is to work with an organization that embraces the technology available to them and utilizes that technology to communicate wherever possible.

While there is no substitute for a face-to-face, verbal “thank you” to an employee, there are a number of channels for recognition which can be used in order to get the recognition to the employee faster, especially as our workforce continues to become more widespread geographically.

The use of Smartphones, online recognition applications and peer-to-peer videos are excellent ways to provide more timely recognition and reinforce employee engagement.  These methods allow for social recognition as well among fellow employees and peer work communities.  Feedback, such as congratulations from other team members, can be almost immediate and multiplies the overall effectiveness of the recognition.

In order to engage, retain and improve the productivity of our workforce, recognition strategies have to evolve to effectively communicate with the changing workforce of today.  There are numerous communication channels available today which take advantage of social, mobile and other technologies utilized by Generation-Y and, in many cases, Generation -X.  Using multiple channels of communication can offer interactive, frequent and immediate communication.

What recognition channels are you using to recognize your workers?  Are you using enough channels?  Are you using the right channels?

If you’re struggling with these questions and are searching for ways to help your business evolve its recognition process, please call our Advice and Resolution team today at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746.

Create a Flexible Work Environment With These 6 Tips

Thursday, October 1st, 2015
Molly Hegeman, VP of HR Services

Molly Hegeman, VP of HR Services

In today’s post Molly Hegeman, CAI’s Vice President of  HR Services, shares helpful strategies for companies looking to offer more flexible scheduling to its employees.

When CAI first surveyed about flexible schedules in 2012, 48% of companies responded that they offered some form alternative work schedules.  In the 2014 NC Policies and Benefits Survey, that number had grown to 52%. In a recent discussion that I had with a group of HR professionals in Jacksonville, NC, this market trend got a lot of interest. Alternative work arrangements are definitely gaining popularity with employees, as evidenced by feedback in the Employee Opinion Surveys that CAI conducts.  All levels and types of employees are voicing a greater interest in flexibility with their hours, the work environment, etc.

With the convenience of mobile and wireless devices, many employees can work nearly 24/7. It seems only right that we should recognize the efforts of employees who check and respond to emails, complete a project after hours, etc. by giving them flexibility with their time.  So, what does that mean for employers?  More specifically, how do you make it work, especially in traditional organizations?

It used to be that companies would only allow a policy to exist if it affected all employees. I don’t think that’s practical anymore. Now don’t get me wrong, I believe all employees should be treated fairly. But fairly does not mean equal in all situations. For example, you may be able to offer a work from home schedule to an employee whose work is fairly independent and not contingent upon physically being in the office. That may not be practical, however, for the receptionist whose main job function is physically greeting customers/clients. It’s probably not reasonable for the organization to set up a virtual/Skype situation.  But, that employee could be afforded the option of a modified work shift and/or remote phone coverage (leaving only limited in person reception duties to be rearranged when needed).

So what’s an organization to do when it hasn’t previously offered flexible scheduling or remote work arrangements?

  1. Understand the options like flex time (schedule-based: compressed work week, flex hours, etc.) and flex location (location-based: telework, working remote).
  2. Consider why you would introduce flex work arrangements and what problem you are trying to solve (downsizing office space, employee morale, etc.).
  3. Ensure your management team supports schedule and/or location-based flex arrangements
  4. Define eligibility and the business situations that support the flex arrangements (even if you start in selected departments within your organization)
  5. Establish guidelines and procedures for your employees and managers to follow
  6. Continuously evaluate the flex arrangements and impact on employees, morale, productivity, business needs, etc.

In a world where there are competing interests and demands on all of us, why not consider the opportunity to help support your employees’ work-life effectiveness?  Whether you introduce small changes or a full program, the positive reaction and response from your employees (and managers) will be returned ten-fold. Flex work arrangements are a great strategy in attracting, retaining and motivating your workforce!

Want more information on our survey findings? Need help creating or updating your flexible schedule policy? Feel free to contact me, Molly Hegeman, directly at (919) 713-5263 or molly.hegeman@capital.org.