Archive for May, 2015

Top 5 Things Employees Enjoy Most about Working for Their Company

Thursday, May 28th, 2015

In today’s video blog, Sean Walsh, CAI’s Survey Support Specialist, shares the top five reasons employees say they enjoy working for their employers.

He starts by asking, “Have you ever wondered what your employees think of your organization?”

Finding out whether your employees love or hate their workplace can be discovered by measuring employee attitudes through an Employee Opinion Survey (EOS). Sean says they are one of the tried-and-true methods of HR.

He shares that in 2014, over 3000 employees completed an employee opinion survey with CAI. In the video, Sean reveals the top five things that employees enjoy most about working for their current employers and why they enjoy these five workplace aspects:

 5) Benefits 

 4) Management

 3) Schedule / Hours 

 2) Job Responsibilities / My Work 

 1) Fellow Employees / Enjoy the People 

If you have any questions regarding Employee Opinion Surveys, or possibly conducting an Employee Opinion Survey yourself, please feel free to reach out to Sean at Sean.Walsh@capital.org.

 

Attract Top Talent with Your Employee Value Proposition

Tuesday, May 26th, 2015

employee value propositionYour Employee Value Proposition (EVP) is a critical tool in your efforts to attract top talent and keep your best employees.  Think of your EVP as the elements that would make up the second half of this sentence spoken by one of your employees, “I give my time, talents, best effort, ideas for making things better and drive to succeed to (fill in your company name) and in turn I get…”

These should be your key selling points when you are talking to great candidates and when you are reminding your employees why they continue to make the good decision to stay with your organization.

The Corporate Executive Board has released data demonstrating the importance of the EVP.  An attractive EVP can reduce the compensation premium needed to hire top talent by 50 percent.  An effective EVP enables an organization to improve the commitment of employees by up to 37 percent.

Now let’s be clear, I realize not every employer can have Google-level perks.  But you need to concentrate on the key things that differentiate you as an employer against the other companies with which you compete for talent.

Here are a few areas where you can differentiate:

  • Pay
  • Health insurance benefits
  • Vacation and paid time off
  • Work-life balance or blend
  • A clear organizational purpose/mission
  • Meaningful work
  • Career development and learning opportunities
  • Positive work environment
  • Autonomy
  • Big goals and a driven workforce

It’s not just one thing that makes a difference.  And despite the fact that I listed pay first, that is only one piece.  Many people would be more than happy to take the average wage for their role to work in a great environment where they are well respected, with a great work-life balance and the chance to make meaningful contributions.

Evaluate your organization’s EVP.  If you are not sure what it is, ask a group of your best employees.  Capture it.  Put it on paper.

Now think about the audience who you want to be able to attract and keep at your organization.  Do research on that group.  Does your EVP match up to what’s important to them in an employer?  If not, what do you need to change to make your organization a more attractive destination for them?

An important point is that you need to make sure your EVP aligns with the wants and needs of the talent you want to attract and keep.  If it doesn’t, you are investing money in the wrong things.  Reevaluate the situation and make choices based on what you know about your audience.

Having a well-formulated EVP based on strategic choices you’ve made as an employer will give you an advantage over your competition for talent.  If you haven’t already developed a clear EVP, now is the time to do so.

At CAI, we are happy to talk you through this and all of your other HR issues and opportunities.  Feel free to give our Advice & Resolution team a call at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746.

10 HR Practices that Destroy Small Business Productivity – Letting Poor Performance Slide

Thursday, May 21st, 2015

In today’s video blog, CAI’s VP of Membership, Doug Blizzard, continues his series on the ten HR practices that destroy productivity. This month Doug focuses on poor performers and how letting them slide drains company productivity, profit and growth.

Doug asks employers to think about poor performers in their lives and how the consequences of their actions can cause frustration for others. He then shares how poor performers can negatively impact top performers.

Offering insights from management thought-leader Bruce Tulgan, Doug says that “undermanagement” is one of the most detrimental phenomenon affecting businesses today.  Doug shares that poor performers come in three categories:

  • They don’t know what do
  • They can’t do what you’re asking
  • They won’t do what you’re asking

He continues the conversation with a mention of hiring practices. Many performance problems are really hiring problems in disguise.  To prevent problems, Doug advises employers to take more time assessing candidates.

If you’d like help managing your poor performers, please call CAI’s Advice and Resolution Team at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746.

 

Are We Beginning To See Price Transparency In Healthcare?

Tuesday, May 19th, 2015

The post below is a guest blog from Jay Lowe who serves as Principal, Health & Welfare Consultant for CAI’s employee benefits partner Hill, Chesson & Woody.

healthcare costsAs pricing in the healthcare market continues to rise, we, as consumers of this healthcare, will begin seeking more cost-efficient ways to pay for this. Many experts agree that one way to begin to slow this rise is to become smarter with our healthcare buying decisions. A ‘smart healthcare consumer’ is one who seeks out the highest quality of care at the lowest price and understands the impact of their healthcare buying decisions.

One of the major hurdles to this is the lack of understanding on where to find information. In areas where there is a lot of competition for healthcare, costs can vary for the same procedure at different facilities. However, based on one’s medical plan, the cost to the patient may be the same by the time the deductible and coinsurance limits are met. The patient doesn’t realize there is a cost difference because his or her out-of-pocket expenses remain the same. It is the insurance company that is ultimately paying the difference, which causes potential increases to premiums at the next renewal.

This disconnect of the user of the healthcare (the patient) and the payer of the healthcare (the insurance company) is beginning to shrink as we see a shift to more consumer-driven health plans like high deductible plans and HSA-qualified plans. More of the actual charges are now being paid by the member on these types of plans. Due to this, the demand for greater pricing transparency is increasing.

We are now beginning to see the marketplace respond as third party companies are unveiling new technology designed to give us more precise information on the cost and quality of the services we seek. The Milkin Institute School of Public Health points to a number of new resources designed to give consumers cost information. Additionally, the health insurance carriers are redesigning their cost comparison tools on their member websites. Just recently, Blue Cross Blue Shield of NC introduced a new pricing tool that integrates the member’s underlying health plan to show actual out-of-pocket cost for procedures at different facilities. This gives members a true shopping experience when seeking care.

Some carriers have developed phone apps that compare expenses and outcomes for many services and procedures, allowing consumers to find healthcare providers, urgent care centers, and emergency facilities, as well as average costs for medical services.

Ultimately, we will be able to evaluate our healthcare costs quickly and easily. It will be our responsibility as consumers to use this information efficiently and hopefully make an impact to our premiums.

The Questions You Shouldn’t Ask in an Interview

Tuesday, May 12th, 2015

interview questionsInterviewing candidates can be an enjoyable and sometimes stressful endeavor. This interview or interviews may be the only chance you get to ask all that you want to know about a candidate before you make a hiring decision.

You don’t want to forget to ask something and you do want to ask all of the right things. This could sound alarming to you, or maybe you love interviewing candidates and that is one of the reasons you decided to go into HR. No matter what your view is on interviewing, one thing you don’t want to do is ask questions that could get you and your company into trouble.

That’s right, trouble. There are interview questions that are illegal.  According to a recent survey from Careerbuilder.com*, one in five employers has unknowingly asked a job candidate an illegal interview question. The legality of these questions ultimately protects both parties involved. For you and your future candidates’ protection, take a look at this list of illegal interview questions:

  • What is your religious affiliation?
  • Are you pregnant?
  • What is your political affiliation?
  • What is your race, color or ethnicity?
  • How old are you?
  • Are you disabled?
  • Are you married?
  • Do you have children or plan to?
  • Are you in debt?
  • Do you socially drink or smoke?
  • When do you plan to retire?
  • Where do you live?
  • What was the nature of your military discharge?
  • Are you a U.S. citizen?

You may find that you have asked some of these questions before, or that you need to know these things to make your hiring decisions. You may have wanted to know if someone was ok with relocating so you asked her where she lives. To make sure you are protected, ask her instead flat out if she is willing to relocate. Or ask a candidate where he sees himself in fifteen years instead of when he is planning on retiring.

Think through interview questions before asking them, and make sure you aren’t breaking any laws!

For more information of the legalities of interviews and interview questions, contact a member of CAI’s Advice and Resolution Team at 919-878-9222 or 336-668-7746.

*Careerbuilder.com

Photo Source: COD Newsroom

Summer Planning for Youth Employment

Tuesday, May 5th, 2015
Pat Rountree, HR Advisor

Pat Rountree, HR Advisor

Summer is on its way, and in today’s post, CAI’s Advice and Resolution team member Pat Rountree shares critical information about summer employment opportunities for teens and young adults.

Applications for summer employment are likely already arriving as the school year draws to an end. Now is a good time to review things you need to know to be in compliance with laws affecting youth employment.

Wage and Hour Laws

Non-Agricultural

North Carolina and federal law have limitations on hours and occupations for employees under age 18 applicable to non-agricultural employers. Where North Carolina employers are also subject to the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), the laws that offer the most protection to minors are applicable.

Youth under 18 may not work in any occupations determined to be hazardous or detrimental. (See http://j.mp/NC-HAZ and http://j.mp/NC-DET.)

During non-school weeks, there are no restrictions on hours for youth 16 and over. If they are attending school, they may not work during the hours of 11:00 pm to 5:00 am if they have school the next day unless waived in writing by a parent or principal.

Minors age 14 and 15 may not work in any manufacturing job and are limited to eight hours per day, 40 hours per week between the hours of 7:00 am and 7:00 pm (7:00 am to 9:00 pm from June 1 to Labor Day) during non-school weeks. They must also be given a 30 minute break after working five hours. For more detailed information on restrictions for youth age 14 and 15, go to http://j.mp/Y-15.

Children of business owners may work for their parents in their business any hours, but not in hazardous or detrimental occupations as noted above.

Agricultural/Farm Jobs

North Carolina does not regulate youth employment in agriculture. For the applicable federal law, go to http://j.mp/j-ag.

Youth Certificate Required

All youth under age 18 working in North Carolina must obtain a youth certificate (worker’s permit) and submit it to the employer prior to starting work. See http://bit.ly/ncdol-y. These must be retained for at least two years after employment ends or until the employee reaches age 20.

Agricultural Occupations

The North Carolina youth employment provisions do not apply to farm work.

Drug Testing and Background Checks

Attorneys recommend having the parent sign the consent for pre-employment drug testing or post-offer background checks if these are required contingencies. However, the results should be released to the minor and not the parent(s).

Completing the Form I-9

If the minor has documents to satisfy I-9 requirements, they may complete Section 1 and present documents.

If the minor cannot present documentation of proof of identity and authorization to work, the parent may complete Section 1 on behalf of the minor. (See http://j.mp/I9-m.)

If you have questions about youth employment, please contact a member of CAI’s Advice and Resolution team at 919‑878‑9222 or 336‑668‑7746.